PipeChat Digest #1322 - Saturday, March 25, 2000
 
RE: The "Popular" pipe organ
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
The "Popular"  organ
  by "VINCENT S PARKS, III" <legacyhouston@pdq.net>
Re: The "Popular" pipe organ
  by "Stan Guy" <texstan@earthlink.net>
RE: The "Popular" pipe organ
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: New instrument
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
PipeChat IRC on tonight
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
re: The "Popular" pipe organ
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: The "Popular" pipe organ
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
There is Power in the Organ
  by "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com>
Re: The "Popular" pipe organ
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: The "Popular" pipe organ
  by "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com>
Obscure organ/movie reference
  by <Pepehomer@aol.com>
Obscure organ/movie reference
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: The "Popular" pipe organ
  by <p.wilson2@juno.com>
 



(back) Subject: RE: The "Popular" pipe organ From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 08:40:53 -0600   The most popular local recital annually is the "Four Organists/Four = Organs" program at the First Presbyterian Church of Oklahoma City. The large audience moves among the spaces to hear a II/10 Moller, a II/29 Austin, a II/6 Walcker, and a IV/85 Moller. Relatively little of the music played = in "churchy."   Peter   Another approach might be for those places with oodles of money to have = two or more organs of reasonable size which could play different kinds of literature appropriately. How wonderful it would be to go to a recital = and   have the opening section on a lush romantic style instrument in equal temperament; the next section, sparkling baroque music on another in Kirnberger; and the next section in French Classic with another unequal temperament, or French Romantic with the appropriate temperament. Imagine =   how exciting it would be to hear contrasting reeds and the slight = variations   in flue work from organs in various locations in the building. It would = be   so much more interesting than having someone play 285 ranks full tilt or full celestes all evening!      
(back) Subject: The "Popular" organ From: "VINCENT S PARKS, III" <legacyhouston@pdq.net> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 10:52:15 -0600   At my church we are in the first year of an Arts Series (8 events in the series, 8 symphony performances, plus the Christmas musical). One of the most popular events so far was the Philadelphia Organ Quartet. Organists Peter Richard Conte, Michael Stairs, Colin Howland, and Rudy Lucente = played a wonderful program on 4 Allen Renaissance Organs. The program was not "organ literature", but wonderfully crafted and impeccably played arrangements/transcriptions of orchestral music. Well over 800 attended (inc. 350 or so season ticket holders). The POQ was our fourth organ concert since moving into the new sanctuary on Palm Sunday, 1998, and the best attended. Just the novelty of 4 organists playing 4 organs made the event easier than most organ concerts to promote, and definitely attracted folks who otherwise wouldn't come to one of our organ programs.   We will not limit ourselves to "organ-lite" concerts in our series, but = they sure do win friends to the instrument.   Vince Parks Houston      
(back) Subject: Re: The "Popular" pipe organ From: "Stan Guy" <texstan@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 12:36:25 -0600   Peter ----   When does the annual 4-organ recital occur? I live in Dallas = and my mom and bro are in Yukon so I am in OKC often.   Best Regards,   Stan Guy        
(back) Subject: RE: The "Popular" pipe organ From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 14:12:00 -0600   Hi Stan:   It's usually in mid-September. I'll try to remember to post something.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Stan Guy [mailto:texstan@earthlink.net] Sent: Friday, March 24, 2000 12:36 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: The "Popular" pipe organ     Peter ----   When does the annual 4-organ recital occur? I live in Dallas = and my mom and bro are in Yukon so I am in OKC often.   Best Regards,   Stan Guy         "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: New instrument From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 16:39:15 EST   In the discussion "Pipes and Bytes" I expressed the opinion that I would = like to develop a real time digital instrument that does not imitate the pipe organ - we have the technology- Should we waste our time? or should we continue to build pure pipe organs? I see no reason why the two = instruments can not peacefully co-exist. At present we can build an instrument with 88 =   note manual keyboards 37 note pedal keyboards. With 128 voice polyphony = for each division, Midi in out, transposers, record - playback, blaa - blaa - woof - woof - If you can think of it - it can be done - how about Jessie Craford glissando? All this for about half the price of a modestly sized = pipe organ. Speakers and amplifiers - no problem. With current technology we = can get 10,000 watts of class D power amplifiers and modestly sized speakers that will produce powerful fundimentals down to 32' C and stay on budget. This is basically a grand sampling synthisizer. There are currently = avalible on CD ROM 10,000 different samples. Musical sounds and sound effects - you =   want an ovation - you got one. Or - you can hook up a pair of microphones = and sample anything you want. The choir ( you could use a few more more voices = ), The congregation, the clergy, an organ, a piano a digereedoo, a passing truck. Do we want this? I don't know. Please tell me. If we build it, will =   they come? I don't see the Allen and Rodgers people ( or any one else ) attempting anything like this, and they are unarguably the leaders in electronic church instruments. Please tell us - be civil.   Your humble servant: Alan A. Binger Organbuilder  
(back) Subject: PipeChat IRC on tonight From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 17:53:32 -0500   Hi Pipe Chatters,   We shall be live on-line again this evening at 9.00 PM Eastern Time for = one of our bi-weekly get togethers. Join us, everyone is welcome. You can find out how to join in if you follow the instructions in the PipeChat Web =   page:   http://www.pipechat.org   You may also be interested to have a look at the following Web page:   http://www.orgalt.com/main.html   This will lead you to the On-line e-zine "Organ Alternatives" which is published every quarter, and in this quarter's issue has two CD reviews by =   members of the PipeChat List.   I hope that you will join us this evening.   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: re: The "Popular" pipe organ From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 19:39:54 -0600   Greetings again, all!   There have been some interesting responses so far to this thread -- but several have made me realize that I unintentionally neglected a few things...<G>   First: Rick Veague writes: >why not a pitcher of beer and some pizza to go with that? --and all >the bells and whistles!   Of course, Rick -- how could I not have included the fact that the Theatre Organ and its music can be just as enjoyable to the general public as any sort of classic or concert organ?! (and, you *can* often get good food = and drinks for consumption during TO concerts!!) Ahh, if only there were more of them out there...like municipal organs, we all must fight to preserve and promote those that remain in the world. (for instance, there are *no* extant TO's in the state of AR...<wistful sigh>...a situation I hope will change one day.)   DesertBob added another one I neglected when he wrote: >Another secret of the music bizz that's no secret: Promote, promote, = PROMOTE! >Flyers, pasteboards, radio spots in community bully-tin = boards...anything's >fair game.   You're absolutely right, Bob -- people won't attend a concert if they = don't know it is going to happen!! One related question also occurred to me -- (which the purists will have already noticed in my posts on this matter, I'm sure <g>) -- Despite the semantics, why do we call public performances on the organ "Recitals"?? Is not "Concerts" a slightly more public-friendly word?? Sorta draws off the 'academic' feel of it, doesn't it...? Mightn't this be a good thing??   Bob Conway pointed out the fact that the late Virgil Fox, Carlo Curley, = and Diane Bish all exhibit some of the same traits in their performances than those I was suggesting. He went on to add: >It not only has been done, but continues to be done to this day. I hope >that some of our younger organists will take up the challenge, and even = if >they have never had the chance to actually see Virgil in the flesh, = listen >to the re-issues of his "Heavy Organ" concerts. He knew how to pack them = in!   Indeed, Bob, it has all been done before, at least to some degree. It's *my* contention, though, that it needs to be done on a MUCH more frequent basis, by a much greater number of artists, if we're ever to get our = organs back into the ears of the public. As much as we can still enjoy Carlo and Diane, (no flames here please, folks -- I *do* think that there are many that enjoy them as well as Virgil's recorded legacy...they all *do* have the audience numbers to prove it!) the fact would seem to remain that there are simply too many "academic exercises" masquerading as organ concerts. There are plenty of proper opportunities for such academics, of course, but it seems in general agreement that the audience for such performances is severely limited, and thus that we should not expect these to further our exposure to the "general public".   Finally, Adrianne Schutt related what must have been a priceless moment at an otherwise "normal" performance of not-quite "popular music". Thanks = for sharing that, Adrianne -- I agree with you that it was a good example, = even if not an "organ event". Perhaps you all will allow me to share my favorite sorta-similar example which occurred at one of our local AGO chapter (!) recitals a couple years ago.   Madolyn Fallis, of San Antonio TX, played a most enjoyable concert for us that evening. She did most of the things I mentioned in my original posting, and as well, was quite frank in her narrative about certain minor "liberties" she took with a couple of the selections in the program (which could have left the 'academics' in the crowd a bit shocked already...but I heard nothing non-musical about any of it.) The organ being played that night, BTW, is a large and complete 3m instrument -- *very* classic in every respect, with a decided French accent. All too soon, the printed program was complete, and we responded with enthusiastic applause. An encore was in order...and what an encore we got!!   Madolyn explained that she had grown up in the Nazarene Church, and also that she is a great fan of Theatre Organ music. Then she took the bench again, punched a piston or two to find a good starting point, made a few additional registration changes...<g>, and off she went -- into one of the most rousing TO-style renditions of "There is Power In The Blood" that = I've ever heard -- with ALL the trems going full blast...swell shades flapping furiously...left-foot pedaling...solo lines brought out...glissandos...the WHOLE SCHMO!!! I'd have *never* though that *that* organ could have sounded so much like a Mighty Wurlitzer!! It was FABULOUS!! Even the AGO crowd in attendance was laughing out loud by the time she finished -- as well as applauding even more vigorously than before. I only wish I'd have known in advance of the concert -- I could have certainly 'goosed' the trems ever-so-slightly for the occasion!! (but they did remarkably well, anyway! <g>)   But again, the point of relating all this -- Ms. Fallis was quite = obviously having GREAT FUN being there and playing for us...and her performance not only showed it, but made all of us in the audience feel it and enjoy it with her. *THIS*, my friends, is what I think *all* of us need to do more often, in whatever fashion we can do so, if we stand a chance of ever again interesting the "general public" in the organ and its music.   I do hope that this thread might continue a bit more -- I'd still love to hear everyone's thoughts about what other things might be done to help generate a renewed interest in the organ amongst the general public. Methinks that this topic is of substantial importance...and often not nearly discussed enough amongst ourselves.   CHEERS!!   Tim (now going off to look thru old concert tapes!!)            
(back) Subject: Re: The "Popular" pipe organ From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 22:56:27 -0500   Thanks Tim, for your additional input. When I was with WurliTzer in = Florida back in the '70s, we had company artists every month come down for a 2 to 3-day concert series.   These people were pros. They played FOR the audience- not DOWN to them. Along with the usual banter and bs, they provided many toe-tapping tunes.   Occasionally, many would play serious or semi-serious organ/piano pieces that displayed an enormous amount of talent.   Is it a common practice (anymore) to advertise concerts in newspapers? We did back then, and the response was great.   Municipal instruments- auditoriums, high schools, remaining origional theatre installations, even downtown cathedrals deserve to have their instruments maintained and heard.   Years ago at the Rialto Theatre in Joliet, Illinois, the high school = concert orchestra, the Barton theatre organ, and the choir all got together for a concert. The grand finale was Stars and Stripes Forever. The place went wild. We need more of that- too many couch potatoes out there.   Thanks, Rick        
(back) Subject: There is Power in the Organ From: "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 23:14:19 -0500   Dear friends,   Last night I finally got a chance to do something I've been trying to do for a long time: get my brother, an editor at a legal publishing house = and the kind of solid churchman who gets elected to the vestry and therefore might possibly vote on a music budget or organ project at some point or other, to hear a *real* organ. Tom has spent his whole life in small parishes with aging electronics or indifferent pipe organs, while I have spent a good part of mine arranging to be in places with instruments that are fun to play (e.g. the Holtkamp tracker at St. Patrick's Foxhall, the Aeolian-Skinner in Cornell's Sage chapel). Last night Tom and I met for dinner at a mall only a block away from my current venue, Church of the Epiphany in downtown DC, as I had a choir rehearsal at 7:30. After dinner I offered Tom the 15-minute tour of the church, so we went over there and Eric turned on the 60+-rank Aeolian-Skinner with two humongous reeds = (front and rear) and disappeared and I hit one of his hymn pistons and played one verse each of Bryn Calfaria and Ode to Joy.   After I paused, Tom asked, "Is this some kind of power thing? Small = people making a lot of noise?" To which I replied, "For sure."      
(back) Subject: Re: The "Popular" pipe organ From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 23:17:20 EST   In a message dated 3/24/00 9:46:20 AM Eastern Standard Time, pstorandt@okcu.edu writes:   << The large audience moves among the spaces to hear a II/10 Moller, a II/29 Austin, a II/6 Walcker, and a IV/85 Moller. Relatively little of the music played = in "churchy." >> Sound like fun! Duh! What it "churchy", other than chorale prelouds? = Any sample programmes.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://community.webtv.net/cremona84000/ALLHAILTHEPOWERand http://community.webtv.net/hydrant/TheBeaglesNest http://community.webtv.net/bruco/STORIESINGLASS  
(back) Subject: Re: The "Popular" pipe organ From: "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 23:18:39 -0500   At 10:56 PM 3/24/00 -0500, Rick wrote: > >Years ago at the Rialto Theatre in Joliet, Illinois, the high school = concert >orchestra, the Barton theatre organ, and the choir all got together for a >concert. The grand finale was Stars and Stripes Forever. The place went >wild. We need more of that- too many couch potatoes out there. >   Thanks for the reminder that I need to start learning Charles Ives's "America" now if I'm going to haul it out at the peak of the summer supply season, the July 4th weekend.   Evie  
(back) Subject: Obscure organ/movie reference From: <Pepehomer@aol.com> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 23:21:31 EST   Hello all - I have a rather interesting question about an organ piece that = I heard in a movie. I was in my Spanish 102 class today, and, being Friday, we watched 20 minutes of a spanish movie (gotta love college). So, the professor puts = in "Hombre mirando al sudeste" - translated "Man Facing Southeast", a movie = made in 1986 about a mental patient who says he's from space. At the beginning of the movie, this "spaceman" goes to the chapel, = sits down at the organ, and begins to play a Bach piece. My professor loves = the song, but didn't know what it was. I have not heard it before either, but = it was obviously Bach. Now, to all you movie/organ afficionados out there, does anyone have a =   clue what this piece was? Is was in a minor key, and was either a Prelude =   and Fugue or Fastasy and Fugue (those are my best guesses at least) Thanks for any input! Justin Karch Organist, Holy Trinity LCMS Rome, GA  
(back) Subject: Obscure organ/movie reference From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 23:27:13 -0500   Justin,   if you can, sit down at a keyboard, hum the opening notes and write them down and post them. Maybe if we know what key it was in or at least the theme, we might be able to help.   Carlo  
(back) Subject: Re: The "Popular" pipe organ From: <p.wilson2@juno.com> Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2000 01:13:05 -0800       On Fri, 24 Mar 2000 19:39:54 -0600 Tim Bovard <tmbovard@arkansas.net> writes: > Greetings again, all! > > There have been some interesting responses so far to this thread -- > but > several have made me realize that I unintentionally neglected a few > things...<G>   **snip** > But again, the point of relating all this -- Ms. Fallis was quite > obviously having GREAT FUN being there and playing for > us...and her performance not only showed it, but made all of us > in the audience feel it and enjoy it with her. *THIS*, my friends, > is what I think *all* of us need to do more often, in whatever fashion > we can do so, if we stand a chance of ever again interesting the "general > public" in the organ and its music.   Amen to that!   I realize that an organist has a lot to think about, especially when playing from memory. But can't y'all at least look like you're enjoying what you're doing?? Why the grim faces? It's OK to smile, especially after you've finished playing! Welcome the applause - you've earned it!   And, while you're about it, get rid of the formal evening attire. A nice suit - for either gender - is quite sufficient. No need to look like you got lost on your way to the ball.   Shalom, Preston p.wilson2@juno.com   > > I do hope that this thread might continue a bit more -- I'd still > love to > hear everyone's thoughts about what other things might be done to > help > generate a renewed interest in the organ amongst the general public. > Methinks that this topic is of substantial importance...and often > not > nearly discussed enough amongst ourselves. > > CHEERS!! > > Tim > (now going off to look thru old concert tapes!!) > > > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >