PipeChat Digest #1326 - Wednesday, March 29, 2000
 
Re: HELP...
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: HELP...
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
RE: HELP...
  by "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com>
Re: HELP...
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: New instrument
  by "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com>
Re: HELP...
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
Re: New instrument
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: HELP...
  by "ldpatte@attglobal.net" <ldpatte@attglobal.net>
Re: HELP...
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: HELP...
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: HELP...
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: HELP...
  by "ldpatte@attglobal.net" <ldpatte@attglobal.net>
Re: HELP...
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@mailbox.syr.edu>
Wells Cathedral Concert on 9 April 2000
  by "Cole Carroll" <CCole@fourthchurch.org>
Re: HELP...
  by <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Ft. Worth Tornado - Cross-Posted
  by <PipeLuvr@aol.com>
 



(back) Subject: Re: HELP... From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 08:44:46 -0500   > From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> > >> little dodads? > > We always called the "Torchbearers".... > Can't go with Becky on that one. A torchbearer is a person who carries a candle mounted on a staff (a torch). Doubt that there's an officially = hoary name for the brass thing you light and snuff with, but "candlelighter" and "snuffer" (as Becky also opted for) have certainly been in common use.   But to the original question: The acolytes walk up the AISLE to do this? What for? The dodads should be stored (with the matches) in the nearest out-of-sight place there is to the candles (most commonly a sacristy). = And brought from there by the shortest and LEAST conspicuous route to light = the darn candles. This is not an occasion (much less an "excuse") for a = PARADE, for Pete's sake.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: HELP... From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 08:56:56 -0500       Alan Freed wrote: > > > We always called the "Torchbearers".... > > > Can't go with Becky on that one. A torchbearer is a person who carries = a > candle mounted on a staff (a torch). Doubt that there's an officially = hoary > name for the brass thing you light and snuff with, but "candlelighter" = and > "snuffer" (as Becky also opted for) have certainly been in common use.   Snuffer is commonly used for the thing to put out the candles. This is an incorrect use of the word. Snuffing refers to trimming the wick, not = putting the candle out. We always called them candlelighters.   > > But to the original question: The acolytes walk up the AISLE to do = this? > What for? The dodads should be stored (with the matches) in the nearest > out-of-sight place there is to the candles (most commonly a sacristy). = And > brought from there by the shortest and LEAST conspicuous route to light = the > darn candles. This is not an occasion (much less an "excuse") for a = PARADE, > for Pete's sake.   The altarboys (acolytes have a different function) non-chalantly light/put = out the candles before and after mass. The only real "formal" thing about it = was remembering to genuflext when passing the cross at the center. The = candlelighter "tool" was kept in the sacristy along with the spare candles.  
(back) Subject: RE: HELP... From: "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 08:31:10 -0800   My Webster Dictionary gives the following definition (#2) for "snuff": The charred portion of a wick. - v.t. 1 To crop the snuff from (a wick). 2 To put out or extinguish: with out. [ME snoffe]   I've always heard the brass thingy called a candle snuffer.   > Subject: Re: HELP...   > > Alan Freed wrote: > > > > > We always called the "Torchbearers".... > > > > > Can't go with Becky on that one. A torchbearer is a person who > carries a > > candle mounted on a staff (a torch). Doubt that there's an > officially hoary > > name for the brass thing you light and snuff with, but > "candlelighter" and > > "snuffer" (as Becky also opted for) have certainly been in common use. > > Snuffer is commonly used for the thing to put out the candles. This is = an > incorrect use of the word. Snuffing refers to trimming the wick, > not putting > the candle out. We always called them candlelighters. > > > > > But to the original question: The acolytes walk up the AISLE > to do this? > > What for? The dodads should be stored (with the matches) in the = nearest > > out-of-sight place there is to the candles (most commonly a > sacristy). And > > brought from there by the shortest and LEAST conspicuous route > to light the > > darn candles. This is not an occasion (much less an "excuse") > for a PARADE, > > for Pete's sake. > > The altarboys (acolytes have a different function) non-chalantly > light/put out > the candles before and after mass. The only real "formal" thing > about it was > remembering to genuflext when passing the cross at the center. > The candlelighter > "tool" was kept in the sacristy along with the spare candles. >    
(back) Subject: Re: HELP... From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 09:09:23 -0800   Oh, Alan, have you never been in an old-fashioned Anglican church where = the "fire worshipping" ceremony is still carried out? Chimes, orison hymns, = and the solemn procession of the acolytes to and from the altar, all for the sole purpose of lighting or putting out the candles ... we do it ALL (grin). = But you KNEW we would (bigger grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Alan Freed wrote:   > > From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> > > > >> little dodads? > > > > We always called the "Torchbearers".... > > > Can't go with Becky on that one. A torchbearer is a person who carries = a > candle mounted on a staff (a torch). Doubt that there's an officially = hoary > name for the brass thing you light and snuff with, but "candlelighter" = and > "snuffer" (as Becky also opted for) have certainly been in common use. > > But to the original question: The acolytes walk up the AISLE to do = this? > What for? The dodads should be stored (with the matches) in the nearest > out-of-sight place there is to the candles (most commonly a sacristy). = And > brought from there by the shortest and LEAST conspicuous route to light = the > darn candles. This is not an occasion (much less an "excuse") for a = PARADE, > for Pete's sake. > > Alan > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: New instrument From: "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 12:28:54 -0500   At 11:52 PM 3/27/00 -0500, Bruce wrote: >In a message dated 3/27/00 11:16:01 PM Eastern Standard Time, >efrowe@mindspring.com writes: > ><< The first is "Orally" ("Love me tender, love me true . . ."). >> >Not that I missed the humor, but wouldn't her mother prefer her name to = be >spelled "Ora Lee"??? ;-) >   Sorry, that's the way it is in the P.D.Q. Bach manuscript.   Evie    
(back) Subject: Re: HELP... From: "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 13:52:04 -0500     <<<<<<But to the original question: The acolytes walk up the AISLE to do this? What for? The dodads should be stored (with the matches) in the nearest out-of-sight place there is to the candles (most commonly a sacristy). = And brought from there by the shortest and LEAST conspicuous route to light = the darn candles. This is not an occasion (much less an "excuse") for a = PARADE, for Pete's sake.>>>>>>>>   Ah the differences, the differences! That's the only real little bit = of ceremony our church does. They do the announcements first, then I play = the prelude while 1 or 2 children of appropriate age, robed, walk down the aisle, light the candles, and go back out. Then come back during the Benediction Response (choir) to put them out. Currently the only one doing it is my daughter, although we have about 10 kids almost old enough to start. Church is smaller than Alan's, and = no, we do NOT leave matches at church. Same brass "doodads" though. Candlelighters. Makes a nice formal start and ending, and gets the kids involved on a regular basis. I get there early to get the organ and me warmed up, and my husband pries up, trims, and prelights the candlewicks so they will light when = they are supposed to, hopefully.   Diane S.          
(back) Subject: Re: New instrument From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 15:28:53 EST   In a message dated 3/28/00 12:28:57 PM Eastern Standard Time, efrowe@mindspring.com writes:   << Sorry, that's the way it is in the P.D.Q. Bach manuscript. >> Ah! I understand.. Herr Schickele evidently knows ALL of the history. =   hehehehe   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://community.webtv.net/cremona84000/ALLHAILTHEPOWERand http://community.webtv.net/hydrant/TheBeaglesNest http://community.webtv.net/bruco/STORIESINGLASS  
(back) Subject: Re: HELP... From: "ldpatte@attglobal.net" <ldpatte@attglobal.net> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 15:48:28 -0500       Ron Natalie wrote:   > > > Snuffer is commonly used for the thing to put out the candles. This is = an > incorrect use of the word. Snuffing refers to trimming the wick, not = putting > the candle out. We always called them candlelighters.   <snip>   How is it that "snuffer" is incorrect. Doesn't the thing "snuff" the = candle out by depleting its oxygen supply?   Dave C. London, Ont.      
(back) Subject: Re: HELP... From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 16:03:23 -0500       "ldpatte@attglobal.net" wrote: > > Ron Natalie wrote: > > > > > > > Snuffer is commonly used for the thing to put out the candles. This = is an > > incorrect use of the word. Snuffing refers to trimming the wick, not = putting > > the candle out. We always called them candlelighters. > > <snip> > > How is it that "snuffer" is incorrect. Doesn't the thing "snuff" the = candle out by > depleting its oxygen supply? > But the verb "to snuff" doesn't mean put the candle out or deprive the = oxygen supply.   Snuff refers to the burned part of the candle wick. Snuff as a verb = refers to trimming the wick. A candle snuffer looks like a pair of scissors. It is = a colloquial abuse of the term to mean "to extinguish."  
(back) Subject: Re: HELP... From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 15:04:26 -0600   Bert Atwood wrote: > My Webster Dictionary gives the following definition (#2) for "snuff": = The > charred portion of a wick. - v.t. 1 To crop the snuff from (a wick). 2 = To > put out or extinguish: with out. [ME snoffe]   On most Wicks I have come across this is known as the General Cancel Piston <g>   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: HELP... From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 16:12:41 -0500       Bert Atwood wrote: > > My Webster Dictionary gives the following definition (#2) for "snuff": = The > charred portion of a wick. - v.t. 1 To crop the snuff from (a wick). 2 = To > put out or extinguish: with out. [ME snoffe] > The second is the later abuse of the term.  
(back) Subject: Re: HELP... From: "ldpatte@attglobal.net" <ldpatte@attglobal.net> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 16:19:13 -0500     --------------F80529854E7D76AC0313A001 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit       Ron Natalie wrote:   > Bert Atwood wrote: > > > > My Webster Dictionary gives the following definition (#2) for "snuff": = The > > charred portion of a wick. - v.t. 1 To crop the snuff from (a wick). 2 = To > > put out or extinguish: with out. [ME snoffe] > > > The second is the later abuse of the term. >   Does anybody have access to a good Oxford dictionry? If so, what does IT = say?   Dave C. London, Ont.       --------------F80529854E7D76AC0313A001 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML> &nbsp; <P>Ron Natalie wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE>Bert Atwood wrote: <BR>> <BR>> My Webster Dictionary gives the following definition (#2) for = "snuff": The <BR>> charred portion of a wick. - v.t. 1 To crop the snuff from (a wick). 2 To <BR>> put out or extinguish: with out. [ME snoffe] <BR>> <BR>The second is the later abuse of the term. <BR><A HREF=3D"mailto:requests@pipechat.org"></A>&nbsp;</BLOCKQUOTE> Does anybody have access to a good Oxford dictionry?&nbsp; If so, what does IT say? <P>Dave C. <BR>London, Ont. <BR>&nbsp; <BR>&nbsp;</HTML>   --------------F80529854E7D76AC0313A001--    
(back) Subject: Re: HELP... From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@mailbox.syr.edu> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 18:14:35 -0500 (EST)   > On most Wicks I have come across this is known as the General Cancel > Piston <g>   GROAN!    
(back) Subject: Wells Cathedral Concert on 9 April 2000 From: "Cole Carroll" <CCole@fourthchurch.org> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 17:39:41 -0600   Here is the program to be performed by the Wells Cathedral Choir of Men = and Boys at Fourth Presbyterian Church on 9 April at 3:00 p.m. The choir is under the direction of Malcolm Archer. Rupert Gough is the organist. Suggested donation is $20 for reserved seating; $15/$12 (seniors and students) for general seating.   Program Te Deum in C Franz Joseph Haydn Four Motets William Byrd O Lord, make thy servant Prevent us, O Lord Ave Verum Corpus Praise our Lord, all ye gentiles   A Work for Organ (TBA)   Ascribe Unto the Lord Samuel Sebastian Wesley Five Spirituals Sir Michael Tippett from "A Child of Our Time" Bring Us, O Lord God William Harris O Most Merciful Sir Ernest Bullock Greater Love Hath No Man John Ireland   A Work for Organ (TBA)   Pie Jesu Gabriel Faure A Song of Wisdom Sir Charles Villiers Stanford Somewhere Over the Rainbow Harold Arlen, arr. Pickard When I Lay My Burden Down Traditional, arr. Ben Dobey Te Deum Herbert Howells   Organ Repertoire (TBA) Evening Song Edward Bairstow Fantasie Percy Buck from Sonata I in E-Flat Major Grand Choeur in D Alexandre Guilmant Prelude and Fugue in D Major J. S. Bach Prelude in Form of a Toccata Charles Villiers Stanford Choral Improvisation sur le "Vitimae Paschali" Charles Tournemire Four versets on "Ave Maris Stella" Marcel Dupre Toccata all Rumba Peter Planyavsky   We look forward to seeing all of you in the Chicago area for this concert. = A reception will follow the concert.   C. Carroll Cole Arts Administrator Fourth Presbyterian Church 126 East Chestnut Street Chicago, IL 60611-2094 312.787.2729, ext. 252 facsimile: 312.787.4584 ccole@fourthchurch.org <http://www.fourthchurch.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: HELP... From: <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 19:05:51 -0500   > > Ron Natalie wrote: > > > Bert Atwood wrote: > > > > > > My Webster Dictionary gives the following definition (#2) for > "snuff": The > > > charred portion of a wick. - v.t. 1 To crop the snuff from (a > wick). 2 To > > > put out or extinguish: with out. [ME snoffe] > > > > > The second is the later abuse of the term. > > Personally, I think anything to do with charring a Wicks is abuse !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: Ft. Worth Tornado - Cross-Posted From: <PipeLuvr@aol.com> Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 21:38:42 EST   Informational only . . .   We are monitoring reports of a tornado which struck the downtown Ft. Worth =   area shortly after sundown tonight causing significant damage. While the exact perimeters of the damage haven't been determined, the media coverage =   would place the storm very close to Roy Redmon's pipeorgan business. = Initial reports do indicate injuries in the affected area and all off-duty Fort = Worth police and firefighters have been ordered to report for duty. More information should be out later tonight.   I know that Roy is a member of the Piporg-l list (haven't re-applyed for posting rights there), and possibly PipeChat and has an outstanding reputation as a builder in this area. If anyone has contact with him, = please let usknow if they were affected by the storm.   Bob Acker