PipeChat Digest #1372 - Monday, May 1, 2000
 
Re: Famous Music Quotes...
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Martin Baker in Lancaster PA 30 April
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Marcel Dupr=E9
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: What is an organ, etc....
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Indiana auction court case
  by <DEMPAR1@aol.com>
OHS Boston Convention
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
What is an organ, and are reed organs and other such noisemakers off-topi
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
RE: What is an organ, etc....
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: OHS Boston Convention
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
question..xx posted
  by "Ruth S." <theraven@sympatico.ca>
Bach Cantatas and Japanese
  by <Pblobaum@aol.com>
Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Recital Announcement (x-posted)
  by <SchultzRH@aol.com>
Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese
  by "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com>
Re: question..xx posted
  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: question..xx posted
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Famous Music Quotes... From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 08:34:00 -0400   Pete: Perhaps it's been done to death, but there's the very well known = one from composer-theologian Martin Luther: "Music is a gift of God. I place music next to theology and give it the highest praise."   Alan   > From: Oboe32@aol.com > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Sat, 29 Apr 2000 19:41:53 EDT > To: Piporg-l@CNSIBM.ALBANY.EDU, Pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Famous Music Quotes... > > I need to "ground" the paper with a quote, something relating to > music or the education of music.    
(back) Subject: Re: Martin Baker in Lancaster PA 30 April From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 09:28:53 EDT   In a message dated 4/28/00 8:50:41 PM Central Daylight Time, kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu writes:   << Martin Baker, formerly of Westminster Abbey and now of Westminster Cathedral, London, will play at Trinity Lutheran Church, 31 S. Duke St., Lancaster PA, at 4 p.m. on Sunday. >>   I had the pleasure of meeting and hearing Martin Baker play, at the Abbey, =   about four years ago, when Dr. Neary was still in charge... Wow, he's not only a great organist but a great guy too -- he allowed me an hour on the Harrison & Harrison after Evensong. I was eventually run off by Dr. = Neary...   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Marcel Dupr=E9 From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Wed, 26 Apr 2000 20:54:23 +0100   >Richard et al, > >concerning the Sketch in B-flat minor, Opus 41, #2 (written in 1945), I >don't find it difficult at all, in fact I play it quite often as a encore >piece. I've never allowed the difficulty of a piece to get to me. If John >Scott learned it for a recording and has never played it since, it = doesn't >say much about his endurance as an organist. When a piece is difficult in >nature, I do the exact opposite....I keep at it until I can play it from >memory!!! How can someone be considered one of the world's best organists if >they stay away from the difficult repertoire? Don't shoot me, that's just my >opinion :) > >Carlo (who also plays the finale from Vierne's 6th symphony)     He doesn't stay away from other difficult stuff (as far as I know!). = Perhaps he has small hands!!!   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: What is an organ, etc.... From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 08:50:22 -0500   My feeling is that over the years of PipeChat we have discussed many different types of instruments including Hammonds and other electronic instruments and none of those have ever been thought to be off-topic. According to the definition that Dave G posted from Jim Cook's web site, all of these would not be considered organs. But that definition is a very limiting one.   I personally own and have in my home a pipe organ, a harmonium and an American reed organ. I consider all of these to be organs and are right on topic for this list. Both a harmonium and an American reed organ is driven by wind, although each of them has a slightly different method of producing sound from the wind. I also do have to consider that many of the French organ composers wrote pieces that were designed both for a pipe organ and a harmonium. I am thinking especially of composers like Vierne, Langlais, Franck just to name a few. Some of those pieces like the "Berceuse" and "Carillon in B-flat" (may have this title slightly wrong since I don't have my music close at hand currently) of Vierne are today considered part of our standard repertoire for recital programming. And there is some literature that REQUIRES some of these instruments. I am thinking especially of the Rossini "Petite Messe..." which is scored for two pianos and Harmonium. It really can't be done correctly without the Harmonium.   Prior to the invention of the Hammond, which at least to me marks the start of the electronic instrument era, what would a church, chapel, etc. do if they couldn't afford a pipe organ or didn't have space for one? They would have a reed organ of some sort. Today that niche is filled by electronic instruments. Personally, and don't try to flame me for this as this is my own personal opinion which will not change, harmoniums and American reed organs are much more legitimate instruments than today's electronic instruments since they didn't try to masquerade to be something they aren't. They were what they were and a whole body of literature has been written for them, some of which as I pointed out above can be also transferred to a pipe organ without any problems.   Along these same lines, I consider the Hammond a very legitimate instrument, not because there is a a body of literature written for them but for their part in developing a usage in Jazz and other types of "popular" music. Hammond B-3s are very prized today by rock groups to turn into "road" instruments and command a very high price on the used instrument market.   I do realize that there are churches that either can't afford or don't have space for a pipe organ and therefore do have to turn to a substitute instrument such as one of the digital instruments produced today. I have no problem with that but will not normally go out of my way to hear one of them. These digital instruments fill a need the same as a harmonium and a reed organ did in the past. In some of the cases today I would much prefer to see a church have something along the lines of one of the old Hook and Hastings that were built for small churches or along the lines of a Caville-Coll "Choir Organ" rather than one of the over-sized digital instruments that many of them install. Don't get me wrong, I am not against large instruments but I find it somewhat ludicrous to see a tiny church seating a few hundred people that has a massive 4 manual 80+ stop (or more) digital instrument!!   And to get back to the topic of the subject line - ALL of these are ON-TOPIC for PipeChat in my estimation.   Just some rambling thoughts on a beautiful, relaxing Sunday morning from Little Rock, AR where I am really looking forward to hearing Felix Hell on Tuesday at Subiaco Abbey.   David  
(back) Subject: Indiana auction court case From: <DEMPAR1@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 11:21:39 EDT   I am posting this to both lists at the request of someone who is not a = member of pipe Chat. Phil Lyons, who is the defendant in the original suit, is = the president of our ATOS chapter. I understand that the case and, Phil's counter suit, are scheduled to be heard in court in Indiana in the next = week. I know that Phil would appreciate hearing from anyone who was present at = the auction in question. A lot of us who buy organ parts at auctions are interested to see how this turns out.   <Two List members have posted on the above subject.   I seem to recall this incident, or one very similar, took place many months ago and was discussed on this List. Can the reporting members, or anyone else, give more details ? Who is suing who? Criminal or Civil ? State court or Federal District Court ?   Karl  
(back) Subject: OHS Boston Convention From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 12:37:11 -0400   Prestant16@aol.com wrote: "Speaking of the [OHS} convention.... does anyone know when more information will become available? Any ideas on the usual cost of the convention?"   Thanks for the opportunity to respond to this. And, also, thanks to David for copying to pipechat my earlier post to piporg-l on this topic.   The registration fee for OHS conventions generally runs in the $400 to $500 range for the entire 8 days of activities which include at least 30 recitals by as many players on as many organs. It is also possible to register for fewer days at rates per day. The fee includes all events, transportation during the convention, and a number of meals. We are still in the midst of figuring this for the Boston convention, so I cannot say what the fee will be as yet.   We hope to have full registration information in snail mail to OHS members by mid-May. We are happy to send it to non-members as well if they will please request it at <convention@organsociety.org>, and we welcome non-members to OHS conventions (in fact, they become members with an add-on to the registration fee). OHS members need not request the information; it will be sent automatically as soon as it is printed.   As the information becomes available, we will post it to the convention website at http:/www.organsociety.org/boston. However, it may actually appear on PIPECHAT and on PIPORG-L before we get around to posting it on the web page. But, we're only talking a day or two difference (I hope).   It will be a great convention for all of the reasons most people already know. I could mention a lot of the organs, but many will not know some of the charming and magnificent smaller and less famous instruments. So, here are a few of the biggies:   Aeolian-Skinner at The Mother Church   Aeolian-Skinner at Church of the Advent   1863 E. & G. G. Hook at Immaculate Conception Church (infamous for the destructive debacle ca. 1987 at the hands of its Jesuit owners, and now in a much better situation with an OHS member as Pastor!)   1875 E. & G. G. Hook & Hastings, Holy Cross Cathedral   1854 E. & G. G. Hook 3m, Jamaica Plain Unitarian (home church of the Hooks)   1859 E. & G. G. Hook 3m, Jamaica Plain Baptist & several more Hook organs & other 19th C. organs   Aeolian at the Boston University "Symphonic Organ Laboratory"   a (rare in these parts) unaltered E. M. Skinner church organ   EP organs by others, including a Frazee   "reformed" organs by Fisk, Noack, Bozeman, Flentrop, others (some optional)   brand-new organ by Richards, Fowkes & Co.   Mt. Auburn Cemetery "the organbuilders' graveyard" and other festive things!   Bill    
(back) Subject: What is an organ, and are reed organs and other such noisemakers off-topic From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 13:46:02 EDT   ....and what is the fourth??? Stan Krider   In a message dated 04/30/2000 5:02:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes:   << To quote from Dr. James H. Cook's excellent History of the Organ and How = it works website: "to be considered an 'organ' it must have four basic components: *pipes that produce sound *are placed on a chamber that stores wind under pressure that has been mechanically generated, *and access of wind to pipes controlled by a keyboard " This is the definition I go by. However, that should not exclude the discussion of related instruments from this friendly discussion list. Dave _________ >>  
(back) Subject: RE: What is an organ, etc.... From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 13:15:36 -0500   Hi David:   Welcome to Arkansas! Do you think I might hook up with you all for your Tuesday crawl?   Peter   Just some rambling thoughts on a beautiful, relaxing Sunday morning from Little Rock, AR where I am really looking forward to hearing Felix Hell on Tuesday at Subiaco Abbey.   David   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: OHS Boston Convention From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 13:31:19 -0500   At 12:37 PM -0400 4/30/0, William T. Van Pelt III wrote: >Prestant16@aol.com wrote: "Speaking of the [OHS} convention.... does >anyone know when more information will become available? Any ideas on >the usual cost of the convention?" > >Thanks for the opportunity to respond to this. And, also, thanks to >David for copying to pipechat my earlier post to piporg-l on this topic.   Bill,   I figured you wouldn't mind my forwarding it to the PipeChat list and thanks for the additional info.   One question, you mentioned that there are arrangements for the Boston Park Plaza Hotel as the convention hotel - could you post the information for us to be able to call and make our reservations for the convention? Hopefully, they have an 800 number for making reservations.   Will be looking forward to getting the registration package soon - I know from some discussions on the PipeChat IRC that there is a lot of interest in this convention and there will be a number of PipeChatters attending.   David    
(back) Subject: question..xx posted From: "Ruth S." <theraven@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 16:28:25 -0400   Hello A friend and I will be in the Elizabeth/NJ area on May 11th (Thursday). I think this is close to N.Y. City ??(I'm after all, only a Canadian :). Does anyone know of any Pipe Organs we could see on that Thursday, or any Concerts that are happening. If you have any info, could you please email me.... Thanks, Ruth, by Lake Ontario, Canadian Side    
(back) Subject: Bach Cantatas and Japanese From: <Pblobaum@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 18:18:13 EDT   Excuse me if this has been discussed... I am thinking of ways to mark = Bach's 250th death anniversary in my church; and I am thinking of a series of articles in the church newsletter. It seems to me I read something about how the Japanese people are being turned on to Bach's cantatas, and after hundreds of years of little impact = on Japan, converts to Christianity are occurring in great numbers. Has = anyone read about this in church literature? About all I can find on Internet = is a Chuck Colson Prison Ministry web site that has an article about that; but = its hardly documented with facts.   Any help would be appreciated.   Paul Blobaum Organist / Chancel Choir Director Trinity Lutheran Church ELCA Park Forest , Illinois 60466  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 17:08:41 PDT   It sounds like _big time_ evangelical wishful thinking to me, like when their medium-budget religious thriller movie "Omega Code" came out a few months ago -- it was trumpeted loudly by everyone in the religious right = as a major milestone in "bringing America back to Jesus." Well....   Fact of the matter is: George W. Bush is no more likely to end up prez = next January than before "Omega Code" came out.   J. S. Bach is something of a darling of the religious right, a humble good =   "family values" man who through divine inspiration wrote the "greatest" music the world has ever known, or so they say. IMHO Bach's music while long on sophisticated counterpoint, rarely has much of a good, danceable toe-tapping beat.   Finally it needs to be remembered that the Japanese have always been importers of culture, sometimes it sticks, usually it is merely a cool fashion. If you study the true spirit of Japan you will see why the christian religion (being something of a mishmash of quaint and curious dogmas) will never catch on there; very little of christianity makes much sense to the Oriental way of thinking.   So are Bach's cantatas converting gobs of Japanese? Probably not; = remember Japan has been awash in Bach and other western classical religious music = for quite a long time now with little effect.   And not too many Japanese speak German.   Lots of Americans have studied Zen buddhism, many practice it, but has = that caused a mass conversion of the USA to Zen? No, not really. Our people = for the most part pick and choose their beliefs from various sources (note = what a large proportion of Christians believe in reincarnation despite it being =   found nowhere in scripture); the Japanese are no different.   >Excuse me if this has been discussed... I am thinking of ways to mark >Bach's >250th death anniversary in my church; and I am thinking of a series of >articles in the church newsletter. >It seems to me I read something about how the Japanese people are being >turned on to Bach's cantatas, and after hundreds of years of little = impact >on >Japan, converts to Christianity are occurring in great numbers. Has = anyone >read about this in church literature?     >About all I can find on Internet is a >Chuck Colson Prison Ministry web site that has an article about that; but =   >its >hardly documented with facts.   I would say that 99.999% of the claims of the religious right are hardly documented with facts.   Dave G.   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 17:19:52 -0700   Christianity has been in Japan a LONG time ... the Jesuits in the 16th = century probably would have made a lot more converts if the Vatican hadn't been so tight-albed about imposing western liturgical/cultural customs ... the = Jebbies were quite happy to adapt eastern liturgical norms from Shinto, like white = for mourning and using rice wine, rather than grape wine, etc. But the = Vatican, true to form, insisted that the Jebbies try to turn the Japanese into 16th = century Portuguese Roman Catholics. They lost. Among other things, the jansenist conception of intense personal guilt is entirely foreign to the eastern = way of thinking.   If Bach is such a darling of the religious "right", then how come most of = their churches sing praise choruses?   Cheers,   Bud   "Dave G." wrote:   > It sounds like _big time_ evangelical wishful thinking to me, like when > their medium-budget religious thriller movie "Omega Code" came out a few > months ago -- it was trumpeted loudly by everyone in the religious right = as > a major milestone in "bringing America back to Jesus." Well.... > > Fact of the matter is: George W. Bush is no more likely to end up prez = next > January than before "Omega Code" came out. > > J. S. Bach is something of a darling of the religious right, a humble = good > "family values" man who through divine inspiration wrote the "greatest" > music the world has ever known, or so they say. IMHO Bach's music while > long on sophisticated counterpoint, rarely has much of a good, danceable > toe-tapping beat. > > Finally it needs to be remembered that the Japanese have always been > importers of culture, sometimes it sticks, usually it is merely a cool > fashion. If you study the true spirit of Japan you will see why the > christian religion (being something of a mishmash of quaint and curious > dogmas) will never catch on there; very little of christianity makes = much > sense to the Oriental way of thinking. > > So are Bach's cantatas converting gobs of Japanese? Probably not; = remember > Japan has been awash in Bach and other western classical religious music = for > quite a long time now with little effect. > > And not too many Japanese speak German. > > Lots of Americans have studied Zen buddhism, many practice it, but has = that > caused a mass conversion of the USA to Zen? No, not really. Our people = for > the most part pick and choose their beliefs from various sources (note = what > a large proportion of Christians believe in reincarnation despite it = being > found nowhere in scripture); the Japanese are no different. > > >Excuse me if this has been discussed... I am thinking of ways to mark > >Bach's > >250th death anniversary in my church; and I am thinking of a series of > >articles in the church newsletter. > >It seems to me I read something about how the Japanese people are being > >turned on to Bach's cantatas, and after hundreds of years of little = impact > >on > >Japan, converts to Christianity are occurring in great numbers. Has = anyone > >read about this in church literature? > > >About all I can find on Internet is a > >Chuck Colson Prison Ministry web site that has an article about that; = but > >its > >hardly documented with facts. > > I would say that 99.999% of the claims of the religious right are hardly > documented with facts. > > Dave G. > > ________________________________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 18:00:21 PDT     >If Bach is such a darling of the religious "right", then how come >most = of >their churches sing praise choruses?   I don't know... Convenient manufacturing of myth I assume.   Analogous to rock musicians who rave that JSB was the greatest musician of =   all time, but most (not all) wouldn't be caught dead playing one of his fugues (even rearranged for electric guitar and drums) at one of the mosh-pit-inducing concerts.   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Recital Announcement (x-posted) From: <SchultzRH@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 21:14:04 EDT   Organ enthusiasts in the Phila area:   KIM HEINDEL will be giving an all-Bach recital, Sunday, May 7, at 7:30PM = on the recently dedicated III/70 Martin Ott organ at Trinity Ev. Lutheran Church, 1000 W. Main St., Lansdale, PA.   No tickets are required; free will offering   For directions, see the church web site: www.trinitylansdale.com   Ralph Schultz  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 18:35:21   At 05:08 PM 4/30/2000 PDT, you wrote:   >About all I can find on Internet is a >Chuck Colson Prison Ministry web site<snip>   Wow! Now THERE'S an unimpeachable source! LMAO!   >I would say that 99.999% of the claims of the religious right are hardly >documented with facts.<snip>   True. When you consider that criminals like Colson and Ollie North are active in various "rightie" organizations, the number even seems too = small!   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 18:42:44   At 05:19 PM 4/30/2000 -0700, you wrote: >the Jebbies >were quite happy to adapt eastern liturgical norms from Shinto<snip>But the Vatican, true >to form, insisted that the Jebbies try to turn the Japanese into 16th = century >Portuguese Roman Catholics.<snip>   You betcha! The Jebbies, being about the only truly intelligent order in the Catholic Church, are always on Rome's poop list, moreso now than ever in this century due to the reign of the "Stubborn Pole". Witness the fact that dioceses are robbing them of their "mission" parishes left and right in the US. Shame, for the Jebbie parishes at least have decent organs! Usually, the mafiosos move in, and the organ lapses into disrepair, replaced by gee-tar Masses and other such nonsense.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Cantatas and Japanese From: "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 20:12:46 -0700 (PDT)     Perhaps what really draws the Japanese people to the music of Bach is its sense of order. Order is very much a part of the Japanese culture, both secular and spiritual.     > If Bach is such a darling of the religious > "right", then how come most of their > churches sing praise choruses? > Good observation, Bud.   I was rather put off by the pugnant remarks made about the religious "right". Why are comments like that being made on this list. Isn't this list for music....organ talk?   Stephen Ohmer Bartlesville OK   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Talk to your friends online and get email alerts with Yahoo! Messenger. http://im.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: question..xx posted From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 23:32:55 -0400 (EDT)   Being from NJ at present, I can help you. Elizabeth (why on earth are you visiting there, but anyway) is the city that houses Newark Airport and a host of other heavy industry. Lots of good shopping nowadays too (my family and I love to go to IKEA there).   You are not far from Newark, and so I would recommend you get to the Basilica (or is it still just a cathedral?) of the Sacred Heart, with the magnum opus of the Schantz Company -- a breathtaking instrument. I do not know what is going on there on Thursdays.   There are some other instruments around, but you'd probably do better just hopping over to New York City, a veritable smorgasbord of incredible instruments, plus everything else imaginable too.   If you can travel, which you can by train, Princeton is not far. The magnificient Mander organ at the Princeton University Chapel is worth the trip -- if you don't get to hear the organ, just absorbing that beautiful space will be a delight. There are daytime recitals there, periodically. Incidentally, Princeton is home to both the famed Westminter Choir College and the American Boychoir School.   This ought to get you started.   Neil Brown Barnegat NJ USA    
(back) Subject: Re: question..xx posted From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2000 23:42:02 EDT   In a message dated 4/30/00 11:34:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Innkawgneeto@webtv.net writes:   << If you can travel, which you can by train, Princeton is not far. The magnificient Mander organ at the Princeton University Chapel is worth the trip -- if you don't get to hear the organ, just absorbing that beautiful space will be a delight. There are daytime recitals there, periodically. >>   Sadly, the "magnificent Mander" (we thank you) is totally under wraps for = a very long time - probably another year and a half. Some very serious = masonry and stained glass window work is going on in the chapel, a two year = project, which we are about four or five months into. There is lots of plaster dust =   around the building, and it was thought prudent to cover the organ and console tightly for the duration. My withdrawal symptoms are well = advanced. I will make a happy announcement on the lists when the organ is uncovered - = I can hardly wait.   Yours,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com