PipeChat Digest #1387 - Thursday, May 11, 2000
 
Thank You Bud!
  by "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com>
Re: Bad news
  by "Lef=E8vre" <vlefevere@online.be>
Re: Harmonic flutes -- more trouble than they are worth?
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed to do that
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: Anglican, Schmanglican
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed  to do tha
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed  to do tha
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
harmonic flutes (and reeds)
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed to do that
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: Harmonic flutes etc.
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Missa super "Just The Facts, Ma'am" and other dilecti Liber Missae  Popul
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Peter Sykes Friday Night-Philadelphia
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Missa super "Just The Facts, Ma'am" and other dilecti  Liber Missae  
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Peter Sykes Friday Night-Philadelphia
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: Good Music in the RC Church
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Church Music Re: What exactly WAS wrong with the funeral?
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
OHS Convention Schedule x-post
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed to  do tha
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Fw: organ encounter
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
 


(back) Subject: Thank You Bud! From: "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 13:52:37 EDT   Thank You Bud for saying what is true and right! Vat II NEVER abolished good music and NEVER started glory and praize. The bad interpertaions by the US College of Bishops and egos of parish priests had more than we want =   to admit to do with music takeing a dive along with the high altar and the =   communion rail!   Cheers to Bud!   The Maitre     ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Bad news From: "Lef=E8vre" <vlefevere@online.be> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 19:53:40 +0200   I will pray for you, dear Vicki. You will be fine if you fight back. Vincent Lef=E8vre, Belgium (Bruges)   ----- Original Message ----- From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> To: <Piano-L@uamont.edu>; <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: jeudi 11 mai 2000 0:32 Subject: Bad news     > Dear "Listers," > > I received some news this week that has me reeling. I had a "routine" > lumptectomy last week, and was just told that I have breast cancer and will > need more surgery followed by chemo and radiation therapies. > > Please pray for me. > > Vicki Ceruti > Organist, Center Moriches UMC > Long Island, New York > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonic flutes -- more trouble than they are worth? From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 13:58:33 PDT     >(a) A harmonic flute has a rather unique harmonic structure. I'm not = going >by >book learning here - just my ears. It has a distinctive little 'yip' in >it's >speech (not chiff). These give the stop it's value as a solo voice   It does have a nice sound, that is for sure. Do you happen to have any sound clips laying around on one by itself?   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed to do that. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 14:08:24 PDT   Hi All,   >It seems as though you have been unfortunate in the examples of this >register that you have come across.   Yes, I agree. :-|   >The aim in a harmonic flute, is not in fact to 'get a strong >fundamental'.   I saw that on Dr. Cook's page, something about a double resonating length giving a double strength fundamental... Couldn't quite figure out what was "harmonic" about that...   >the first objective is to obtain an efficient overblow >to the octave, and then depending on the placement of the node hole, >to encourage the required harmonics. Most makers seek to encourage the >twelfth harmonic, and this is often attained with the node hole placed >just a little above the middle of the speaking length.   Wow! 12th harmonic! That's very high. Do you know of any good sound = clips of this sound. This actually makes me think about something I heard the other day, a website with a clip of a rather complex shaped ocarina whose lowest note (most holes closed) had a remarkably strong set of upper partials including a lot of strength at the 11th harmonic. So how do you know where to place a hole to emphasize a particular harmonic?   >When 'chiff' becomes so pronounced >that the character of the pipe is defined by it, then really and >truly, the point has been missed,   Giving more of a panpipes sound, which one rarely hears as an organ stop.   >A well voiced Harmonic Flute note, produces a sensation of a pipe that >briefly thought about sounding its fundamental, suddenly changed its >mind and sounded its octave instead. (!)   Wow!   DG ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Anglican, Schmanglican From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 14:13:42   At 09:49 AM 5/11/2000 -0700, Bud-by-the-Beach wrote: >... the "Dragnet Mass" out of the old Peoples' Mass Book (anybody = remember THAT?)<snip>   Draw trumpets: "Dat da DAHHHH....dat da dat da DAHHHHHHH"   The "Pipple's Mass Book" from WLSM wasn't all that great, but at least it did make available some relatively decent hymntunes, formerly off limits = to RCs. "Old 100th", "St. Anne's", "Ein Feste Burg" and other staples were finally usable, dislodging the Catholic "Big Three"..."Holy God", "Tantrum Ego" and "Oh Salute Taurus" from being about the only thing sung at all = for eons, ad nauseum. The "Dragnet Mass", however, was a real corker, as was = a lot of other stuff in there. "Pipple's Mass" wasn't the worst of them out there, either, if you'll remember! There was, as there is, no standardization; whomever's salesman arrived first (or offered the best deal) usually sold the package. You'll remember its predecessor, the ubiquitous "St. Gregory's", had some real groaners stuffed in it among a few pearls, also! I recently unearthed my old organist's copy of St. Greg's, rifled through it and thought it would have probably been better named "Montani's Musical Revue". He was, overall, a true hack.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed to do that. From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 15:33:26   At 02:08 PM 5/11/2000 PDT, you wrote: >Most makers seek to encourage the >>twelfth harmonic, and this is often attained with the node hole placed >>just a little above the middle of the speaking length.<snip>   I'm QUITE sure the author meant simply "the twelfth", or 3rd harmonic. = The true twelfth speaks at three octaves and a perfect fifth above the fundamental, and is parts of the "trace" partials of any open stop, most noticeable in strings and reeds.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed to do that. From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 19:00:57 EDT   Good observation Bob. There is alot going on in the tone of harmonic = pipes. This is easier to hear when you are right on top of them, when tuning or voicing. This Is the best way to hear any organ stop. Not from digital samples. It occours to me that they should posess some harmonics of pipes = an octave lower and therefore one should be able to tune them to a unison ( = 4' to 4' ). No. It doesn't work. Tune to an 8'. I'd like to get an = osscilliscope and do some research on this but I am too busy with organbuilding. Maybe someone on the list has the free time and the equipment to do something = like this. Also; Harmonic pipes come in other forms besides the usual = cylindrical metal. Conical ones are sometimes called Silverflute and I have also seen wooden versions labeled ( of all things ) Gedeckt.   Alan B.  
(back) Subject: harmonic flutes (and reeds) From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 16:05:58 -0700   The French examples of harmonic flutes I've heard have a remarkably = "harp-like" quality, particularly in a reverberant French church, and indeed that's = how Guilmant used it in the piece he wrote for the dedication of the = Notre-Dame organ ... I forget the name. They are indeed rich in fundamental. Some of = the best Hook & Hastings Doppel Flutes sound somewhat similar.   "Harmonic" reeds with double-length resonators (usually from tenor "C" on = an 8' stop) are very powerful, and likewise have more fundamental than = single-length resonator stops. The Harmonic Tuba at Sacre Coeur is absolutely SHATTERING (grin), but that's the way the French like their Tubas and Bombardes ... = that organ also has a pile-driver 32' Bombarde that's the LAST thing to bring = on in the full organ.   Romantic English harmonic reeds are somewhat more restrained ... one often = finds a Harmonic Trumpet 8' in the Swell, which agrees with E.M. Skinner's = comment that in order to have a proper Swell, you have to have something of = substance inside the box (grin).   Fortunately, the French/English notion that "Full Swell to Reeds" (Fonds = et Anches) is an essential sound for a church organ is coming back into = fashion, replacing the neo-baroque "mystery divisions" behind swell shutters, which = often consisted of flutes at 8 and 4, a 2 Principal, a "dog-whistle" Zimbel, and = a short-resonator "duck caller" reed. One could most emphatically NOT play = Parry's "I Was Glad" with such a swell organ (grin).   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed to do that. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 16:10:52 PDT     >I'm QUITE sure the author meant simply "the twelfth", or 3rd >harmonic.   kind of like an open quintadena eh?   DG     ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonic flutes etc. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 16:13:51 PDT     >Good observation Bob. There is alot going on in the tone of harmonic > >pipes.   Harmonic Reedless Saxophone anyone?   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Missa super "Just The Facts, Ma'am" and other dilecti Liber Missae Populorum From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 16:29:28 -0700       Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 09:49 AM 5/11/2000 -0700, Bud-by-the-Beach wrote: > >... the "Dragnet Mass" out of the old Peoples' Mass Book (anybody = remember > THAT?)<snip> > > Draw trumpets: "Dat da DAHHHH....dat da dat da DAHHHHHHH" > > The "Pipple's Mass Book" from WLSM wasn't all that great, but at least = it > did make available some relatively decent hymntunes, formerly off limits = to > RCs. "Old 100th", "St. Anne's", "Ein Feste Burg" and other staples were > finally usable, dislodging the Catholic "Big Three"..."Holy God", = "Tantrum > Ego" and "Oh Salute Taurus" from being about the only thing sung at all = for > eons, ad nauseum. The "Dragnet Mass", however, was a real corker, as = was a > lot of other stuff in there. "Pipple's Mass" wasn't the worst of them = out > there, either, if you'll remember!   Yep ... then there was "Our Parish Prays and Sings", with the 50-pound accompaniment book.   > There was, as there is, no > standardization; whomever's salesman arrived first (or offered the best > deal) usually sold the package. You'll remember its predecessor, the > ubiquitous "St. Gregory's", had some real groaners stuffed in it among a > few pearls, also! I recently unearthed my old organist's copy of St. > Greg's, rifled through it and thought it would have probably been better > named "Montani's Musical Revue". He was, overall, a true hack.   Not only was Montani a hack, he was a petulant hack ... but some of his footnotes make HYSTERICAL reading. Ditto the Society of St. Gregory's = "Black List" ... EVERY popular Mass was on it ... Farmer, La Hatche (sp?), etc. = ... ALL those Masses were available on Aeolian player rolls (grin). I've = actually DONE Farmer's Celebrated Mass in B Flat ... we sang it for a wedding at = Old St. Mary's in Cincinnati, just for a lark ... it's overblown bad Mozart, = basically, and it goes on FOREVER. But the bride and groom were THRILLED. I guess it helped to have Kathy Battle for the soprano soloist (grin). She was my = soprano soloist for a number of years before she got discovered.   On the other hand, I don't know of another accessible source other that = the St. Gregory for the Michael Haydn Tenebrae responsories; and we sing my = English transcription of the Pietro Yon "Christus factus est" every Good Friday. = The Schubert Palm Sunday music, on the other hand (if indeed it IS by = Schubert) is best burnt (grin).   I'm old enough to remember the battle between the St. Gregory and the St. = Basil Hymnals ... St. Gregory won out amongst the old school nuns, but everybody still had a tattered copy of St. Basil tucked in the bench for Tuesday = night novena services, since Montani had banished "Bring Flowers of the Rarest", "Mother Dear, O Pray For Me", "Daughter of a Mighty Father" ("Macula non = est in te"), etc. from the St. Gregory, and the Tuesday night rosary-rattlers = weren't ABOUT to give up those "hymns". I'm actually rather fond of some of them, = in a masochistic sort of way. I've even taught St. Matthew's choir "Hail Queen = of Heaven, The Ocean Star" for Lady Day ... they LOVE it (grin). And I = genuinely LIKE "Hail, Holy Queen", though I don't think Montani allowed the = traditional tune in his book. I may be wrong. I think we sing it from an even older = hymnal, "Catholic Youth's Hymn Book". I used to have a whole collection of those = things ....   I taught the congregation at Holy Rosary just about every hymn in the PMB = in the eight years we used it, and they could sing just about any OTHER text = to any tune of the correct metre in the PMB.   But my REAL coup was getting an imprimatur on the ENGLISH HYMNAL out of = the diocesan censor deputatis. Unfortunately the Irish curate at Holy Rosary = said he wouldn't say Mass in a church that used the English Hymnal, and the = Pastor let him get away with it, or we'd have HAD it in the pews.   Then the Benziger faux 1940 hymnal came out ... I remember Corpus Christi Church (where Merton was baptized) by Columbia in NYC was one of the few churches to adopt it; it sank like a stone. Didn't Frank Campbell-Watson (?) at the Paulist Choristers church have a lot to do with that hymnal?   I used Worship II and III in the last parishes I was in before I "retired" = from RC music ... they're quite decent, for the most part. I don't know what's current now ... Gather?   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Peter Sykes Friday Night-Philadelphia From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 20:01:13 EDT   Dear Lists,   Tomorrow (as I write this), Friday, May 12th, at 8 p.m., Peter Sykes will play a program that induces excess salivation at the mere reading of it. = As you will see, the program has something for (almost) everyone, including a =   work commissioned for the occasion.   Regulars at OHS conventions certainly know Peter Sykes as a master of all styles from all periods in the history of music for the Organ. He is = Director of Music at First Congregational Church in Cambridge, co-chairman of the Early Music Department and instructor in keyboard instruments and chamber music at the Longy School of Music in Cambridge, and a member of the = faculty of the Preparatory and Continuing Studies Division of the New England Conservatory. He has a number of solo organ recordings to his credit, including "Music of Couperin and Rameau" (Titanic 181), "A Nantucket Organ =   Tour" (Raven OAR-320), and most famously and most recently, his = prize-winning recording of his own transcription of Holst's "The Planets" (Raven OAR = 380), recorded at Girard College in Philadelpha. This recording was named "Best Organ Recording of 1996 by Absolute Sound Magazine. (These recordings can = be found at WWW.OHSCATALOG.ORG.)   I note with considerable interest that the program bio also says that = Peter Sykes "was winner of the New England Conservatory's Chadwick Medal for outstanding undergraduate achievement in 1878," so if you come for nothing =   else, do come to pay tribute to this remarkably well-preserved organist!   The Program:   Buxtehude, Toccata in F, BuxWV 137   James Woodman, All Creatures of Our God and King (2000) This work was commissioned by James Gowen Hood for The Presbyterian = Church of Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, in honor of the dedication of the Mander Organ, and in memory of Lula Archer Hood.   Herbert Howells, Psalm Prelude, Set 2, No. 2   Maurice Durufle, Prelude et Fugue sur le nom d'Alain, Opus 7   Intermission   Pierre du Mage, from Suite du premier ton Plein jeu Fugue Trio Tierce en taille Basse de trompette Grand jeu   J. S. Bach, Allein Gott in der Hoh sei Ehr, BWV 662   J. S. Bach, Passacaglia in C minor, BWV 582   The stoplist of the organ is still in the "News" section of our company Website-we have not received the pictures yet. The church is at 8855 Germantown Avenue, Chestnut Hill, and the phone number there is = 215/247-8855. I am told the tickets ($10) have been going very quickly, so I would = suggest arriving early, if possible.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Missa super "Just The Facts, Ma'am" and other dilecti Liber Missae Populorum From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 17:21:21   At 04:29 PM 5/11/2000 -0700, Bud-by-the-beach wrote: >I'm old enough to remember the battle between the St. Gregory and the St. Basil >Hymnals ... <snip>   Yes, yes, I've still got one whose binding has transformed to "loose-leaf" format over the years...SOMEwhere around here....   >...and the Tuesday night rosary-rattlers weren't >ABOUT to give up those "hymns". I'm actually rather fond of some of them, in a >masochistic sort of way.<snip>   Tuesday nite rosary rattling sorta went by the bye after television really became popular in the late '50s, but remember those old war horses...however, medication lessens their effect, to a great degree.<snarf snarf!>   >And I genuinely >LIKE "Hail, Holy Queen", though I don't think Montani allowed the= traditional >tune in his book. I may be wrong.<snip>   It's not in mine; I can't for the life of me remember where we lifted it from, but we had to use mimeos of it. Remember hectographics and mimeographics theft? RCs were prolific at it. The nuns would churn out stacks of the stuff on hand cranked Ditto machines, and deliver it to the choir room, still fresh. Within 15 minutes, the whole place would be higher'n a kite!   >But my REAL coup was getting an imprimatur on the ENGLISH HYMNAL out of the >diocesan censor deputatis. Unfortunately the Irish curate at Holy Rosary= said >he wouldn't say Mass in a church that used the English Hymnal, and the= Pastor >let him get away with it, or we'd have HAD it in the pews.<snip>   I remember the "FBI" Franciscan nuns practically spitting on anything English in the parochial schools. This attitude was refreshingly gone when I got attached to a parish that had Dominicans out of Texas, however..."ya'll". Folksy and realistic, they were good people, and educationally lightyears ahead of the FBIs.   >I used Worship II and III in the last parishes I was in before I "retired" from >RC music ... they're quite decent, for the most part. I don't know what's >current now ... Gather?<snip>   Fairly ubitquitous, I imagine, but I don't really pay attention on what they're doing anymore. By the way...I always thought a fitting postlude to "Missa Dragnet" would have been a processional march, =E1 la Purvis, of the old "Highway Patrol" TV show theme. I had it worked up one time, to fits of tearful laughter to those that heard it...but was too chicken to try it.   Pedal Bombardes blaring: "BOMP BOMP BOMP BAAAAAAAAAAH....."   dB  
(back) Subject: Re: Peter Sykes Friday Night-Philadelphia From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 17:22:38 PDT     >Buxtehude, Toccata in F, BuxWV 137   Good.   >James Woodman, All Creatures of Our God and King (2000) > This work was commissioned by James Gowen Hood for The Presbyterian >Church >of Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, in honor of the dedication of the Mander >Organ, and in memory of Lula Archer Hood.   Hmm...   >Maurice Durufle, Prelude et Fugue sur le nom d'Alain, Opus 7   A nice piece but a little slow for my undergrad. friends I've turned onto theater organ.   >Pierre du Mage, from Suite du premier ton > Plein jeu > Fugue > Trio > Tierce en taille > Basse de trompette > Grand jeu   This sounds interesting. Opportunity to show off the various stops and = tone colours?   >J. S. Bach, Allein Gott in der Hoh sei Ehr, BWV 662 >J. S. Bach, Passacaglia in C minor, BWV 582   I suppose those are OK choices.   DG     ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Good Music in the RC Church From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 20:28:53 EDT   In a message dated 5/11/00 9:00:21 AM Eastern Daylight Time, the_maitre@hotmail.com writes: > I beg your pardon ?!? This is almost to say that Romans can't have = good > music so get used to it; only Anglicans have good music. Actually, No! But sort of..... Not even all Anglicans/Episcopalians = get to have good music now. It is not the norm and is getting more scarce = with each passing month. I have seen, however, very little good music in RC parishes and the "home office" doesn't seem to be doing much to help.   >Has our craft gotten so cheap as to allow > any old ditty tune to be played in the name of praising God ? Perhaps not our craft, but those in charge of worship, i.e. clergy, are = not on the same page as most of the musicians and many of the parishoners. They are out to bring fun into worship and more and more and more people = in the door. It's pretty much out of our hands.     >Just because it was done well and with taste - it > is called Anglican or Episcopal. (Cause we Romans just aren't capable = of > doing anything good - is that right?!?!) I hate to be accusatory, but I think you are being too sensitive here. = The RCs have basically dumped all this is beautiful is worship, and finding dignity and beauty in RC worship is indeed surprising. Most are not surprised when beautiful music and worship is encountered in an Episcopal church. We (Episcopalians) expect it of our church.   > Accepting mediocrity in music and musicians only serves to crumble our > stance on supporting the pipe organ and music written for pipe organ. = It is > sad that some are willing to accept a long painful death of the = pipeorgan - > being replaced by "praize bands" for which Eagles Wings and The Mass Of =   > Creation were written for. If we as music directors are not able to minister > with OUR instrument and OUR music but must pretend to like "crud" just = as > long as we play it on the organ so we have a job - then we have failed = to > minister to people and have just played any ol' music for a pay check. There > are names for people who do just about anything for money you know. Yep! The name is "employed". When you take a stance and lay your job on =   the line to preserve good music and the pipe organ in worship, you are virtually sentencing yourself to unemployment. I admire your fire and verve, and will be here to offer comfort when you have been ejected by the =   very people to whom you were trying to minister. Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Church Music Re: What exactly WAS wrong with the funeral? From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 22:06:20 EDT   In a message dated 5/11/00 1:45:11 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Cremona502@cs.com writes:   > I was really ticked at the video tape of one of the dedicatory recitals = at > Claremont UCC on the new Glatter-Goetz played by Daniel Roth.   Curse the spellchecker... I was really TICKLED!!! at the video. ....     Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: OHS Convention Schedule x-post From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 22:50:18 -0400   The schedule of the OHS Convention is posted as of this evening at http://www.organsociety.org/boston/   There are a few formatting glitches to sort out, so you may want to wait a day or two until our webmaster has time to fix my amateur HTML. But, the schedule is now available for all who wish to make plans immediately.   New accommodation information is also available on the site.   Registration information will be mailed in about 10 days.   Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed to do that. From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 22:07:59 -0500   >>I'm QUITE sure the author meant simply "the twelfth", or 3rd >harmonic. > >kind of like an open quintadena eh? >   Dave   I would suggest that what you need is to educate yourself by spending time LISTENING!! And not trying to get "sound samples" to listen to via a computer but to go hear things IN PERSON. Many of these questions you keep answering are not ones that can be answered in words - sometimes it is very hard to describe what we are hearing and each of us might hear something different out of the same pipe.   it seems to me that you are trying to reduce all of this to a science with some sort of exact perimeters which none of this is - The voicing of pipes is an ART not a science. You can give the exact same pipe to several different experienced voicers and each of them will make it sound different - each sound will be to their own concert of what that pipe should sound like.   I would suggest that you make arrangements for your vacation to fall during the month of August and go to Boston to attend the OHS Convention where you can HEAR first hand many different instruments. That is the ONLY way you can ever get a grasp.   BTW, just to confuse you further there are some voicers that use three holes at the node of a Harmonic Flute instead of one - figure that one out.   David    
(back) Subject: Fw: organ encounter From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 22:07:16 -0500   >-----Original Message----- >From: Luther Melby <lmelby@prtel.com> >To: Pipe Chat <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Date: Friday, April 14, 2000 10:19 AM >Subject: organ encounter   >On April 12th, the Otter Tail ATOS chapter >in Fergus Falls, MN held its first organ encounter with >19 enthusiastic 6th graders plus 1 teacher in attendance.   The 1st organ encounter went over very well with the school and students, so 3 more encounters were done this week. On May 8th we had 23 students, May 9th 24 students, & May10th 21 students, for a total of 87 students at all 4 encounters. Hopefully this will be a annual event at the Mighty Wurlitzer.   >We had a hands on deminstration in the lobby >of various type pipes with small bellows to blow them. >Next they were ushered into the theatre to hear and >play the Mighty Wurlitzer. We divided them into 2 groups >to go into the chamber with all the bells and whistles. >Pizza and soft drinks topped off the visit. >( A great bunch of kids ) > >Luther >