PipeChat Digest #1388 - Friday, May 12, 2000
 
We don't realize a whole LOTTA things!
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed to do that
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Visit to Poland/Czech Republic
  by "Philippe Beullens" <pbeullens@hotmail.com>
Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed todo that.
  by "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk>
Re: We don't realize a whole LOTTA things!
  by "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk>
 


(back) Subject: We don't realize a whole LOTTA things! From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 20:48:04   At 10:07 PM 5/11/2000 -0500, David S. wrote: >I would suggest that what you need is to educate yourself by spending >time LISTENING!! And not trying to get "sound samples" to listen to >via a computer but to go hear things IN PERSON.<snip>   Sage advice, indeed. There's no substitute for hearing it "up close and personal". Much of what happens acoustically is lost when such a tone is sampled.   >it seems to me that you are trying to reduce all of this to a science >with some sort of exact perimeters which none of this is - The >voicing of pipes is an ART not a science. You can give the exact >same pipe to several different experienced voicers and each of them >will make it sound different - each sound will be to their own >concert of what that pipe should sound like.<snip>   To me, the "science" of voicing lies pretty much wholly in our ability = over the last 60 years to electromagnetically record it, analyze it via Fourier methods for harmonic content and the various powers of each, and, fairly recently, being able to analyze for transient intonation and decay characteristics, using Fast Fourier Analysis techniques. Much of what happens to that air column in there is still the subject of conjecture and hypothesis, rather than pure science. Through empirical methods, some of what has been held as sacrosanct about the voice of a pipe has been debunked in this century, such as importance the material of the pipe itself on the pipe's tonality. As I stated not long ago, it wasn't until Ernest Skinner did some cursory research around the time of World War I that we found the true relationship of the "windsheet" to the mouth of the pipe as it relates to tonal production. A scant few years before that, Audsley was still in a quandry as to how it worked! Ditto the question as to whether the reed actually fully closes the shallot or not...no one = knew!   So, we've learned probably more about the organ's tonal producing elements in the last 100 years than at any other time during the instrument's existance. However, this knowledge is but a poverty of information compared to what happens in these seemingly simple, but yet inordinately complex devices. Thus, the ear is the final judge, and the art of voicing remains just that...an art, one to be learned through tradition and study.   By the way, it was again Skinner who first applied the knowledge of the elasticity of air to reason as to why the nodal hole never winds up being exactly in the middle of the pipe. However, builders, notably in France, knew this long before any even remotely scientific explanation could be offered for this oddity, thus showing that empirical methodology made the thing work in the first place, although no one knew exactly why it worked the way it did!   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed to do that. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 11 May 2000 22:24:49 PDT     >I would suggest that you make arrangements for your vacation to fall >during the month of August and go to Boston to attend the OHS >Convention where you can HEAR first hand many different instruments.   I have half a mind to do just that. I was planning to take a Boston vacation this summer anyway.   DG     ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Visit to Poland/Czech Republic From: "Philippe Beullens" <pbeullens@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 12 May 2000 08:15:32 GMT   Dear members,   In July of this year, I'll be visiting the south of Poland (region of Katowice/Krak=F3w) as well as the Czech Republic (Prague).   Does anyone know there some interesting organs to visit?   Best regards       Philippe Beullens Organist Student at the Lemmens Institute of Louvain (Belgium) Naamsestraat 171/31 - B-3000 LEUVEN Belgium Telephone : ++ 32-16-23 77 12 Mobile phone: ++ 32 495 10 46 95   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonic flutes -- Wow I didn't realize they were supposed todo that. From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> Date: Fri, 12 May 2000 09:13:33 +0100     ----- Original Message ----- From: Dave G. > > >I'm QUITE sure the author meant simply "the twelfth", or 3rd >harmonic. > > kind of like an open quintadena eh?   Just so long as everyone knows what I mean - <<GG>>   Chris B    
(back) Subject: Re: We don't realize a whole LOTTA things! From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> Date: Fri, 12 May 2000 09:34:54 +0100     ----- Original Message ----- From: Bob Scarborough   > So, we've learned probably more about the organ's tonal producing elements > in the last 100 years than at any other time during the instrument's > existance.   Yet the curious thing is, there seems not to have been one single instance, where we have been able to point to a tonal improvement and say - "there! that's the improvement we gain from all the research we carried out into tone production".   I suppose it's different for makers of digital instruments, who *are* improving all the time, although there will come the point where they too reach their limit, and have to acknowledge that there is a point in the individual characteristic of each and every organ pipe, which is simply a non-reproducible function of nature, and has variables which cannot successfully be scientifically evaluated.   Chris B