PipeChat Digest #1410 - Monday, May 22, 2000
 
Reverse Cipher?
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Reverse Cipher?
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Reverse Cipher?
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: Reverse Cipher?
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Reverse Cipher?
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: Reverse Cipher?
  by "Nelson And Tracy Denton" <ndenton@cgocable.net>
Robert Hope-Jones... what a character.
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: pitch (X-posted)
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
RE: Wedding Woes
  by <wmcree@InfoAve.Net>
Kalifornia Kilga-Ball??
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 


(back) Subject: Reverse Cipher? From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Sun, 21 May 2000 13:07:29 EDT   Greetings all,   Today at the end of the service I had a very strange thing occur. The A = flat in the pedal did a reverse cipher (if there's such a term). All stops = drawn on the pedal or coupled to it would sound at both pitch and a fifth above = if the note was NOT depressed. However, when I played the offending note nothing would play on the pedal. This is a 40 yr. old McMannis pipe organ =   and it's direct electric action if this helps... I'm clueless...   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Reverse Cipher? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 21 May 2000 12:43:58 -0500   DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote: > > Greetings all, > > Today at the end of the service I had a very strange thing occur. The A = flat > in the pedal did a reverse cipher (if there's such a term). All stops = drawn > on the pedal or coupled to it would sound at both pitch and a fifth = above if > the note was NOT depressed. However, when I played the offending note > nothing would play on the pedal. This is a 40 yr. old McMannis pipe = organ > and it's direct electric action if this helps... I'm clueless...   If the note sounds when the key is not depressed and stops sounding when the key is depressed, I would normally suspect that the contact had got the wrong side of the pin. The note sounding one fifth higher as well, however, is very puzzling unless there is a 5.1/3' coupler on your organ, in which case the contact for the coupler might have got the wrong side of the pin too. 5.1/3' couplers are very rare, though I have occasionally met them. Does your organ have one?   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: Reverse Cipher? From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Sun, 21 May 2000 13:05:12 -0500   At 5/21/00 01:07 PM, John wrote: >Greetings all, > >Today at the end of the service I had a very strange thing occur. The A = flat >in the pedal did a reverse cipher (if there's such a term). All stops = drawn >on the pedal or coupled to it would sound at both pitch and a fifth above = if >the note was NOT depressed. However, when I played the offending note >nothing would play on the pedal. This is a 40 yr. old McMannis pipe = organ >and it's direct electric action if this helps... I'm clueless...   Greetings, John!   Before you call your technician, I'll offer a couple of possibilities that *could* create such an odd problem, which you might be able to fix = yourself very easily.   Presuming that your pedalboard has underkey-contact blocks (a McManis that we take care of does, as do very many other organs) you should look = closely at the contacts for the offending note and those for the 5th which is also being affected. Look first for a wayward paper clip laying across the contact wires, and if there is none, for individual contact wires that would appear to be bent and possibly touching their neighbors. If the organ has a 'resultant' stop or a (wired) 10 2/3' in the pedal, the = problem situation could be present on either of the two notes. When looking for bent or damaged contacts, make sure to examine them both with the pedal = 'at rest' and 'engaged'.   Obviously, if you find a paper clip there, carefully dislodge it (with a pencil perhaps, or similar slender tool), and the problem might just disappear as quickly as it appeared. If the contacts seem to have been bent (which could happen as a result of a pencil or something having = fallen thru the pedals and gotten caught there, even if it has since fallen = away), you must be *much more* careful in straightening the offenders to match their neighboring contact wires. This operation might be best handled = from the *underside* of the pedalboard, if you can detach it and lift the rear of it a bit. A second pair of hands would be very useful here to hold the pedalbd up while you look/fix it. Sometimes, an individual contact or two can become "caught" over or under a neighboring one (again, usually due to something having fallen down thru the pedals), simply needing to be = "popped loose" to its normal postition with a slender tool (as with the 'paper-clip-remover' above). Be gentle to the contact wires themselves no matter what you do -- they are fragile little things that need to be handled with "kid gloves", so to speak!!   If none of these possibilities seems to be the case, you *could* have a problem within the relay of the organ, or a bad ground connection to = either of the affected pedals. This would be more likely to require a call to = the technician for a repair.   Good luck!!   Tim Bovard, service technician Nichols and Simpson, Inc. Little Rock AR      
(back) Subject: Re: Reverse Cipher? From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Sun, 21 May 2000 14:04:33 EDT   In a message dated 5/21/00 12:48:10 PM Central Daylight Time, jlspeller@stlnet.com writes:   << The note sounding one fifth higher as well, however, is very puzzling unless there is a 5.1/3' coupler on your organ, in which case the contact for the coupler might have got the wrong side of the pin too. 5.1/3' couplers are very rare, though I have occasionally met them. Does your organ have one? >>   It does not. Strange isn't it?   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Reverse Cipher? From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Sun, 21 May 2000 14:10:42 EDT   Oh I love a good puzzler! The organ is fourty years old. This means that = it may have an early solid state relay. Does it?   Alan B.  
(back) Subject: Re: Reverse Cipher? From: "Nelson And Tracy Denton" <ndenton@cgocable.net> Date: Sun, 21 May 2000 14:17:41 -0400   I'd be almost 95% certain that you simply have a twisted contact on the pedal board. Considering you have electric action the "fifth" sound might = be due to a "unit" rank of 2 2/3' pitch with contacts crossed. A very common problem when pencils, paper clips and other sundry stuff falls in the pedalboard. To fix the problem simply remove the pedal board*** and look underneath and adjust the contacts back again or remove the offending = pedal key and do the same***. I had the same problem the other day but it was = due to old double cotton covered wire that had rotted away and it caused the cable to short against the common feed line.   *** Caution some pedalboards are nasty things to tangle with, Contacts can get bent, Springs can fly off and cause damage and cables might be short = and will get caught and snap if yanked. Take your time if you have never = tangled with one. They can be tricky.   If you do get it out. Tell us how many pencils and paper clips you find! = My record is 25 pencils, 47 paperclips, 2 combs, 1 broach , 4 pens, and 6 cents ( my pay for the week!)   Subject: Reverse Cipher?     > Greetings all, > > Today at the end of the service I had a very strange thing occur. The A flat > in the pedal did a reverse cipher (if there's such a term). All stops drawn > on the pedal or coupled to it would sound at both pitch and a fifth = above if > the note was NOT depressed. However, when I played the offending note > nothing would play on the pedal. This is a 40 yr. old McMannis pipe = organ > and it's direct electric action if this helps... I'm clueless... > > John      
(back) Subject: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 21 May 2000 14:09:38 PDT     Hi all,   Among the books I ordered from OHS: the Fox biography of Hope-Jones. What = a character. The impression I got was that he was really good at = salesmanship and inventiveness, but when it came to business management he didn't do so =   well. Locking himself into a long-term exclusive contract with Wurlitzer after all his previous joint ventures had gone sour...what was he = thinking? Not a smart move, and tragically fatal -- think how much further along = we'd be if he'd seen the theater organ movement through to its zenith. Interesting that in 1914 he was assigned to invent reedless reeds to = compete with the Haskell designs, ironic that I seem to be picking up where he = left off, albeit with a lot less skill and background :-)   Fox's appendix of his inventions was fascinating reading as was the stoplists (No I didn't read them all in detail :-) but you can certainly = see the evolution of the theater organ design.   Regards,   DG   PS: I have some experimental pipe sound samples on my home page, let me = know if you're interested in hearing them and I'll send you the web address. ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: pitch (X-posted) From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Sun, 21 May 2000 08:29:40 -0500   The question of pitch is extremely interesting since it has varied so much = over the centuries, and with wind instruments is so dependent on temperature. = It has frequently been noted that the pitch of mouth blown instruments can = easily rise 2 hz or cps after having been played 10 minutes. Then there is the high man syndrome = which makes us all push the pitch up slightly in order not to sound flat. The Fisk people checked the Dallas Symphony and found that they typically played as high as 443.5 even though they tuned near 440. Therefore the organ was tuned to 443.5, = but a pitch pipe was installed to give the orchestra a 440 for initial tuning. So much for perfect pitch eh??? Roy   Bob Elms wrote:   > I wonder how they achieve a=3D444. I have a fairly expensive oboe which = I > play. With the reed pushed right in it plays a=3D440. It would never = achieve > a=3D444. I believe the clarinets and some other instruments could be in > trouble too. I have never heard of any orchestra in this country playing > anything but a=3D440, but that does not mean they do not. If the = orchestra is > all strings that would be a different matter. > > B. E. > > Quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > > I forget which list the pitch discussion is on, but here's Maestro = Ivan > > Fischer, Conductor of the Budapest Festival Orchestra, on the subject: > > > > "Musical pitch is gradually moving up. In the eighteenth century music > > was played semitone lower. However it has not been constant. There = were > > local differences. There were many attempts to agree about a pitch. = Near > > the end of the nineteenth century the "Viennese a" has been agreed = to: > > it was a=3D435. But it kept creeping up. Later a=3D440 was agreed. = However > > some orchestras play with a=3D444 Hz. > > The reason is not pipes. It is a natural surge to make music sound = more > > brilliant, bright. > > > > Best wishes > > > > Ivan" > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > -- > ----------------------------------------------------- > Click here for Free Video!! > http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/ > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: Wedding Woes From: <wmcree@InfoAve.Net> Date: Sun, 21 May 2000 22:58:25 -0400 (EDT)       My bride reminded me that as it was decided to do the dismissal before the hymn selected as a retiring processional, the organist forgot about the dismissal and launched into the said hymn. The priest just shrugged as to say, "Oh, well."   On Fri, 19 May 2000, Storandt Peter wrote:   > Bill: > > How wonderfully uneventful! :-) > > Peter > > -----Original Message----- > From: wmcree@InfoAve.Net [mailto:wmcree@InfoAve.Net] > Sent: Friday, May 19, 2000 2:48 PM > To: PipeChat > Cc: wmcree@InfoAve.Net; Carol Hovda > Subject: Re: Wedding Woes > > > > > Believe it or not, ours in Greenville, SC did start on time. We did = have > a wrong hymn number in our bulletin, so the correct hymn had to be > announced by our priest, but otherwise, it went well! Thanks be to God! > > Bill McRee > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Kalifornia Kilga-Ball?? From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 00:50:59   Some times in the past, I've made mention of a rather forgettable 8 rank (or so) Kilgen installed in the Music Room of the Mission Inn of Riverside, CA, known around the turn of the century (last one) as the "Glenwood Tavern" or "Glenwood Mission Inn". Lo and behold, someone provided me with an unused picture postcard of the exact same fa=E7ade pipes (in typical Kilgen fashion of their lengths having nothing to do with reality), in the same exact setting in the Music Room of the Inn, but...with a 3 manual, console, replete with "cash register" stop buttons, like an Estey!! When I played with organ in the '60s and '70s, it definately was 2 manuals with tongue tabs, and most definately had the Kilgen nameplate on it! =20 Now I know the Music Room of the Inn was part of a major addition to the building finished in 1930, when the Kilgen supposedly went in. However, this latest evidence says differently! The reverse of the card states quite plainly "Kimball pipe organ installed in the Glenwood Mission Inn in the Music Room...", NOW giving evidence that Kimball was indeed involved somehow/sometime, and that the 2 manual keydesk was a Kilgen retrofit somewhat later. The slowness of the relay and combination action was most definately Kilgen, interestingly enough. It's quite possible that someone got "Kimball" confused with "Kilgen" (close enough, eh?), and that the three manual keydesk is simply some pretty good "artwork", although the fa=E7ade is most definately a photograph of the real deal as I remember it.   Does anyone have any information regarding this???   Cornfused, with nice shiny orange traffic cone on,   DeserTBoB