PipeChat Digest #1411 - Monday, May 22, 2000
 
Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character.
  by <Posthorn8@aol.com>
Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character.
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character.
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character.
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character.
  by <MickBerg@aol.com>
Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character.
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character.
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Hope-Jones church organ
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character.
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Hope-Jones church organ
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Xpost: Recital Program -- Tyler Robertson UFla
  by "Daryl Robinson" <darylrobinson@hotmail.com>
Re: pitch (X-posted)
  by "Lef=E8vre" <vlefevere@online.be>
Catholic Organist?????
  by "Jason Comet" <diaphone64@hotmail.com>
Re: Catholic Organist?????
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Catholic Organist?????
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character.
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: Catholic Organist?????
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character. From: <Posthorn8@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 07:38:22 EDT   Hi List,   I live on the 8th floor of Manhattan Square in Rochester and our = apartment overlooks the downtown area. It's a beautiful view. We're a block and a = half from the church that houses Hope-Jones opus #1. Many of the church members =   will tell you that his ghost lives in the church. When a friend of mine = was organist there he invited me to play the instrument. It was an early = summer evening just about sunset and we were the only ones in the building. My friend went to make a phone call. After I had played a few hymns I was = just sitting there looking at the stoprail when a cold wind rushed past me. = With this came an audible soft voice that said "mine." The hair on my arms and =   the back of my neck immediately stood at attention. I thought to myself, "This happy camper is out of here." I didn't even turn the organ off. I'm =   not easily scared, but let me tell you, it was one spooky experience.   Right across the street from the church is a small park. From what I understand the park used to be run down apartment buildings and this is = where the old boy did himself in. I can see both church and park from our = balcony and our living room window. I have also been to his grave in Buffalo.   Tim  
(back) Subject: Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character. From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 06:46:21 -0500   Posthorn8@aol.com wrote: > > Hi List, > > I live on the 8th floor of Manhattan Square in Rochester and our = apartment > overlooks the downtown area. It's a beautiful view. We're a block and a = half > from the church that houses Hope-Jones opus #1. Many of the church = members > will tell you that his ghost lives in the church. When a friend of mine = was > organist there he invited me to play the instrument. It was an early = summer > evening just about sunset and we were the only ones in the building. My > friend went to make a phone call. After I had played a few hymns I was = just > sitting there looking at the stoprail when a cold wind rushed past me. = With > this came an audible soft voice that said "mine." The hair on my arms = and > the back of my neck immediately stood at attention. I thought to = myself, > "This happy camper is out of here." I didn't even turn the organ off. = I'm > not easily scared, but let me tell you, it was one spooky experience. > > Right across the street from the church is a small park. From what I > understand the park used to be run down apartment buildings and this is = where > the old boy did himself in. I can see both church and park from our = balcony > and our living room window. I have also been to his grave in Buffalo.   According to David Fox's book on Hope-Jones, he had originally intended to gas himself using the console lighting of his Op. 2 at First Universalist Church, Rochester, but was thwarted in the attempt when he discovered that the church had converted the lighting to electricity and disconnected the gas. He then rented an apartment and gassed himself in an apartment at 10 George Street.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 09:13:16 PDT     >sitting there looking at the stoprail when a cold wind rushed past me. = With >this came an audible soft voice that said "mine."   Two reactions (a) ghost schmost, probably one or the church members was hoaxing you (b) if it really was him, maybe it would have been interesting =   to stay and chat a while, they say ghosts are very lonely, and I'm sure he =   would have had a lot to say.   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character. From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 09:21:08 -0700   If one believes the lore of ghoulies and ghosties and things that go bump = in the organ, the spirits of suicides are "unquiet", and often hang around = seeking some kind of closure ... in this case, perhaps adding another Tibia unit to the = organ (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   "Dave G." wrote:   > >sitting there looking at the stoprail when a cold wind rushed past me. = With > >this came an audible soft voice that said "mine." > > Two reactions (a) ghost schmost, probably one or the church members was > hoaxing you (b) if it really was him, maybe it would have been = interesting > to stay and chat a while, they say ghosts are very lonely, and I'm sure = he > would have had a lot to say. > > DG > > ________________________________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character. From: <MickBerg@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 12:21:53 EDT   Hope-Jones Opus 1 in Rochester?? Is that correct? I thought Hope Jones = built (and wrecked) plenty of organs in England before he went to America. Please correct me if I'm wrong. Mick Berg.  
(back) Subject: Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character. From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 09:19:36   At 09:13 AM 5/22/2000 PDT, you wrote:   >Two reactions (a) ghost schmost, probably one or the church members was >hoaxing you<snip>   I used to think the same thing...until I ran into one! The rush of chilly air is the tipoff.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character. From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 09:47:40   At 09:21 AM 5/22/2000 -0700, you wrote: >in this case, perhaps adding another Tibia unit to the organ >(grin).<snip>   ....or one of those Diapason Phonon smudge-pot looking thingies! A mouth with NO sides...WHAT was he thinking???   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Hope-Jones church organ From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 10:26:38 -0700   I practiced regularly on a Hope-Jones church organ (straight stop-rail, but still with theatre-style colored tabs) from 1956-1962, in the First Presbyterian Church in Bartow, FL ... later, when the church was remodeled, the organ was rebuilt (?) and re-installed ... I don't know if it's still there, though, as it wasn't much more successful in its new location than it had been in its original place, despite better tonal egress. I have no idea where it came from ... it was, I think, older than the church, which was built in the late 1920s.   Either this one had been altered, or Hope Jones church organs were MUCH milder than what I hear described on these pages. The sound could best be described as "mild, milder, mildest" ... no thundering ANYTHINGS. The overall effect was rather coarse, and when you got more than a few things going at more than a few pitches, the sounds tended to cancel each other out.   The units were:   Diapason String (Celeste? don't remember...) Flute Dulciana Oboe Horn   Main Tremulant Oboe Horn Tremulant   There were some pistons, but they were fixed ... I don't recall whether they moved the stop-tabs or not. The console was not AGO. I think there were 30 pedals. The console was a huge, ugly thing, with fake walnut veneer, as I recall.   Cheers,   Bud                    
(back) Subject: Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character. From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 10:22:31   At 12:21 PM 5/22/2000 EDT, you wrote: >Hope-Jones Opus 1 in Rochester?? Is that correct? I thought Hope Jones = built >(and wrecked) plenty of organs in England before he went to America. >Please correct me if I'm wrong.<snip>   Indeed he did, but after escaping England after a slight indiscretion with his male secretary, he came over here and started afresh. He founded the Hope-Jones Organ Company over here prior to selling it off to Wurlitzer after getting into a bit more trouble, I believe. I'd have to go get the books on him, but I believe he did two "start-ups", both failing, before caving in to Rudolph Wurlitzer's overtures. If I'm not mistaken, it was Hope-Jones Opus 10 that first used the later-ubiquitous "horseshoe" = console that would later become a Wurlitzer (and others, including Hillgreen-Lane) staple. Often derided by many blue noses, the "horseshoe" arrangement of tongue tabs is indeed quite ergonomic and the effecting of registrational changes is much easier than with drawknobs or other such appurtenances. "Tongue tabs" themselves were also a Hope-Jones invention, as were rocker tabs.   Hope-Jones is often vilified for his tonal screw-ups, but one must = remember that he did come up with several improvements to the 20th century organ that later became standard among all builders, such as spring tensioned regulators. The attribution to him of the first "reliable" electropneumatic action is not true, however, as there were others working in this field before he fielded his first example in England. However, he was responsible for the action that was used in the Wurlitzer unit organs, which, even today, is the fastest of the type. As bad as his tonal ideas were, they did indeed sway the entire industry in the U.S. for the first = 30 years of the 20th century, even swaying (partially) such luminaries as Ernest Skinner, for whom Hope-Jones worked for about a year He inadvertantly, of course, invented the theater organ, which was finally brought to market quite successfully by Rudolph Wurlitzer.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Hope-Jones church organ From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 10:39:37   At 10:26 AM 5/22/2000 -0700, you wrote: >Either this one had been altered, or Hope Jones church organs were MUCH >milder than what I hear described on these pages. The sound could best >be described as "mild, milder, mildest" ... no thundering ANYTHINGS. The >overall effect was rather coarse, and when you got more than a few >things going at more than a few pitches, the sounds tended to cancel >each other out.<snip>   None other than Ernest Skinner made the same, exact comment about the "coarseness of tone" of Hope-Jones' organs in England, so this sounds = right to me.   >There were some pistons, but they were fixed ... I don't recall whether >they moved the stop-tabs or not. The console was not AGO. I think there >were 30 pedals. The console was a huge, ugly thing, with fake walnut >veneer, as I recall.<snip>   Hope-Jones' consoles varied all over the map before finally settling into the "horseshoe" models around 1910. Interestingly, some of his earlier consoles were minimalist-looking things, using either a straight stop bolster with "hanging" tongue tabs, or rocker tabs. Nothing would = surprise me from him, however! Hope-Jones' combination actions were "blind" at first, and electrically operated, making a great amount of noise, = according to Skinner. He did devise moving-tab combination actions later.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Xpost: Recital Program -- Tyler Robertson UFla From: "Daryl Robinson" <darylrobinson@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 13:35:35 CDT   Perhaps one reason for Tyler's pedal technique is that he studied with = Joyce Jones at Baylor for a POE.     From: Cremona502@cs.com Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> To: pipechat@pipechat.org, PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu Subject: Xpost: Recital Program -- Tyler Robertson UFla Date: Sat, 20 May 2000 13:59:53 EDT   Friday evening, 19 May (8 pm), Tyler Robertson played a recital at the Memorial Auditorium of the University of Florida (Skinner/AEolian-Skinner/Moller 5/100) His program follows: Sonata IV (Allegro maestoso e vivace) ... Mendelssohn Passacaglia & Fugue in c-minor ... Bach Folkloric Suite (V. Rhapsodie sur deux noels) ... Langlais Fugue sur le nom d'Alain (op. 7) ... Durufle Scenes of Childhood .... John Leavitt +++ I Autumn Fires, II Rain, III The Cow, IV The Moon, V Pirate Story +++ Praeludium and Fugue uber B-A-C-H ... Liszt ~~~~ Now that you have read the program and thought "OK, typical program for a university recital", I'll share with you that this was done by a = highschool senior who has been studying at UF in special program for exceptional students (and this guy does qualify!).   He was obviously nervous (as anyone at his age would be), but his playing seldom showed it. A few times there would be the tension-related accelerations in tempo, but he always recovered, getting a grip, and regained control. His playing was very clean and accurate, despite problems with the digital controls of the organ (octaves missing, stops not playing!). He = did mention when I talked with him last week, "Ya know... this wouldn't happen =   on a tracker!!" hehehe I like this kid!   I missed most of the Mendelssohn, but arrived for the grand conclusion (it was sort of like getting to church late!) as I approached the building and made my way through the various entry stages.   The Passacaglia was very academic, but as the piece settles in and he matures I think he will do some wonderful things with it. His cadenza was quite well done and pointed up thematic material rather than just showing off.   The Langlais was one of my favorites. This was extremely sensitively played and he took great care in the thematic appearances. Registration was very, very creative, and where "French" was not possible, it was replaced with colorfully interesting and tastefully appropriate! Tyler proved in this piece that he really knows how to use his ears as well as his fingers and feet.   I don't think I've ever heard the Durufle played this cleanly. It was not =   as fast as usually played on CDs and I found it much more enjoyable. His articulation was very clean and crisp, and his phrasing very sensitive. Registration was quite thoughtful, especially considering that this is one =   of those "no-style" instruments that does nothing authentically. All of the Skinner reeds (save the Clarinet & English Horn) are gone and the squally Moller reeds in an almost dead room somehow don't excite me! Steroidic chiffing of the Positiv flutes (a hat-tip to the Baroque) did not enhance the piece, especially in contrast to the non-chiffing flutes of the Swell and romantic (old Skinner) flutes of the Choir which dont' really hang = together. All this considered, my attention remained primarily on the notes and = how they were played. I think Tyler could play this piece on one stop throughout and still be musical and maintain audience interest.   The Scenes of Childhood were very well done. I purchased this last year, but lost interest in it. Tyler almost rekindled my desire to learn it. I just don't think the quality of the piece is consistent throughout, however. His playing of it showed that he enjoyed it and wanted us to do so as well. Again, his creative registration was a great contribution to maintaining audience attention. He even managed to get some snickers out of the typically reserved academia present.   After arriving still seemingly fresh and relaxed at the final piece, his preference of selections was revealed. He grabbed the "BACH" by the tail and swung it around like a cowboy with a lariat (well, he IS from = Texas!!). He really enjoyed this piece and dove in full force. His tempo was very flexible and dramatic, and kept me on the edge of my seat. Again, registration played a key roll in the excitement of his playing. His = pedal technique simply appears to be effortless and so graceful (is it legal to say that about a Texan??). His physical movement while playing was very conservative, but his hand position remained very close to the keyboard = and very relaxed. Because of the distance from the console to the organ it = was very surprising that such nuances could be managed by one of "tender age."   In addition, his spoken program notes were interesting and informative, = and, again, revealed his love for the music he played. I must confess I did = not read the printed program notes, as I left my glasses in the car!!! = Sheesh -- senior moment!!!   Remember the name Tyler Robertson. This cowboy is going to be riding high soon!!! Anyone looking for a young artist to inspire young audiences = (and older ones, too) would do well to have him play for them.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: pitch (X-posted) From: "Lef=E8vre" <vlefevere@online.be> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 10:03:31 +0200   Dear Roy, What is the meaning of "high man syndrome"? My mother language is dutch, so I can't understand everything in Eglish writing. Thanks Vincent Lef=E8vre   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: dimanche 21 mai 2000 15:29 Subject: Re: pitch (X-posted)     > The question of pitch is extremely interesting since it has varied so m= uch over > the centuries, and with wind instruments is so dependent on temperature. It > has frequently been noted that the pitch of mouth blown instruments can easily > rise 2 hz or cps > after having been played 10 minutes. Then there is the high man syndro= me which > makes us all push the pitch up slightly in > order not to sound flat. The Fisk people checked the Dallas > Symphony and found that they typically played as high as 443.5 > even though they tuned near 440. Therefore the organ was tuned to 443.= 5, but a > pitch pipe was installed to give the orchestra > a 440 for initial tuning. So much for perfect pitch eh??? > Roy > > Bob Elms wrote: > > > I wonder how they achieve a=3D444. I have a fairly expensive oboe whi= ch I > > play. With the reed pushed right in it plays a=3D440. It would never achieve > > a=3D444. I believe the clarinets and some other instruments could be = in > > trouble too. I have never heard of any orchestra in this country play= ing > > anything but a=3D440, but that does not mean they do not. If the orch= estra is > > all strings that would be a different matter. > > > > B. E. > > > > Quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > > > > I forget which list the pitch discussion is on, but here's Maestro Ivan > > > Fischer, Conductor of the Budapest Festival Orchestra, on the subje= ct: > > > > > > "Musical pitch is gradually moving up. In the eighteenth century mu= sic > > > was played semitone lower. However it has not been constant. There were > > > local differences. There were many attempts to agree about a pitch. Near > > > the end of the nineteenth century the "Viennese a" has been agreed to: > > > it was a=3D435. But it kept creeping up. Later a=3D440 was agreed. = However > > > some orchestras play with a=3D444 Hz. > > > The reason is not pipes. It is a natural surge to make music sound more > > > brilliant, bright. > > > > > > Best wishes > > > > > > Ivan" > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related top= ics > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > -- > > ----------------------------------------------------- > > Click here for Free Video!! > > http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/ > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topic= s > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Catholic Organist????? From: "Jason Comet" <diaphone64@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 15:11:57 EDT   I was asked by an acquantance of mine to be the organist for her sister's wedding. They rented the church and had the initial wedding "meeting" = with the priest. The priest told them that they didn't have an organist. The priest then asked them if they have found an organist. The party told him =   that they wanted me. The priests first question was "Is he Catholic?" = The party told him that he played at the UCC church in town. The priest said, =   "No! He's not Catholic!"   Has anybody ever had this done to them?????????   I'm OUTRAGED!!!!!!! and find the whole thing stupid at the same time! = Why?       The exact same priest asked me last year to be their organist/choir director. He KNEW I played at the UM Church just on the other block. The =   exterior walls of the churches were facing each other!!!!!     ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Catholic Organist????? From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 15:29:35 EDT   This has never happened to me. I'm not RC but have held = organist-choirmaster and assistant organist positions in RC churches and = at this point most of my sub jobs are in Catholic churches. It was noted = in the press last week that the principal organist at St. Patrick's = Cathedral in NYC is Baptist.   I'm never asked about my affiliation when I play at others, either. All = that seems to matter is whether you can play the service.   Maybe that's just life in the "big city."    
(back) Subject: Re: Catholic Organist????? From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 15:35:59 EDT   In a message dated 5/22/00 3:13:03 PM Eastern Daylight Time, diaphone64@hotmail.com writes:   << I was asked by an acquantance of mine to be the organist for her = sister's wedding. The priest told them that they didn't have an organist. The = party told him that they wanted me. The priests first question was "Is he Catholic?" = The party told him that he played at the UCC church in town. The priest = said, "No! He's not Catholic!" Has anybody ever had this done to them????????? I'm OUTRAGED!!!!!!! and find the whole thing stupid at the same time! = Why? The exact same priest asked me last year to be their organist/choir director. He KNEW I played at the UM Church just on the other block. = The exterior walls of the churches were facing each other!!!!!>>     There is a mentality, it seems, among some Roman clergy regarding their desire to have musicians of that faith in their employ. When I was interviewing at the National Shrine of the Little Flower (then Shrine of = the Little Flower, the "National" designation came in September of 1998) I was =   asked the same question. The Pastor knew of the pending National Shrine status and desired a Roman Catholic staff, especially those in the = pastoral and administrative positions. It only makes good sense, at least in my = mind personally, especially when a parish has gained national prominence and a = bit of "spot light" due to the National Shrine designation.   In the interviewing and hiring of the past and present Liturgical Music Assistants (also full time) they were too asked questions regarding their faith, not as a basis for actual hiring but to find out their background = and how much liturgical experience they had, given the huge amount of = programming that occurs here. And since we deal with teaching children and adults = music for our Liturgies, a sense and knowledge of that faith and heritage is = indeed essential and most helpful.   Begrudging someone the opportunity to play the wedding of a friend, = however, especially when said parish is without a staff musician, is a bit much I think. Just food for thought.   Scott Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordination National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI  
(back) Subject: Re: Robert Hope-Jones... what a character. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 12:41:44 PDT   >As bad as his tonal ideas >were, they did indeed sway the entire industry in the U.S. for the >first =   >30 years of the 20th century   They still sway me. Who hasn't heard a theater organ and said to themselves, "Wow! Now that's what organs are supposed to sound like!"   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Catholic Organist????? From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 15:42:57 EDT   In a message dated 5/22/00 3:31:55 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = DudelK@aol.com writes:   << It was noted in the press last week that the principal organist at St. Patrick's Cathedral in NYC is Baptist. >>   Donald Dumler is BAPTIST????? now isn't that interesting............   SFF