PipeChat Digest #1417 - Wednesday, May 24, 2000
 
Re: theatre organ question
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: oboe vs. cornopean vs. trumpet vs. clarinet vs. crumhorn vs. kazoo-en
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: salaries
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
linguistic soup
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Expensive brass.
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: adding a reed stop
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Noodles in the Subbass
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: oboe vs. cornopean
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: oboe vs. cornopean
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Fw: Noodles in the Subbass
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Expensive brass.
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
God Bless America
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
Re: Expensive brass.
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: early pipe organs in theatres
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
Re: linguistic soup
  by "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk>
Re: linguistic soup
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
New Raven CDs
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
Re: oboe vs. cornopean
  by <JKVDP@aol.com>
Re: linguistic soup
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: oboe vs. cornopean
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: oboe vs. cornopean vs. little Martians-in-black-boxes
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: theatre organ question From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 09:37:13   At 12:17 PM 5/24/2000 EDT, you wrote: >I further add that the 4/16 Grande Page in the Fort Wayne Embassy = Theater >seems to have more stoptabs than a RCMH Wurli console which has three = times >as many ranks.<snip>   Page unified EVERYTHING...ever see a clarinet at 16', 8' and 4' on all = FOUR manuals??? LMAO!   DeserTBoB > >Stan Krider > > >Ray Thursby" <raythursby@earthlink.net> >Date: Tue, 23 May 2000 20:29:34 -0700 > >When talking about theater organs, it should be noted that the earliest >instruments installed in theaters were not necessarily unit organs. There >were Kimballs, Esteys and many others that differed little (if at all) = from >standard church/concert design. No doubt some had fancier consoles; the = few >examples I've seen (in photos) don't even go that far. Some even had >drawknobs rather than stopkeys.... > >In the same vein, Wurlitzer was hardly the most ardent adherent to the >everything-everywhere-at-every-pitch syndrome. By unit organ standards, = some >Wurlitzers were pretty skimpy, unification-wise. An eight-rank organ = built >by Page, for example, might well have more stopkeys than a Wurlitzer of >twice the size. > >The one comment from Stan Krider with which I take mild exception is his >characterization of the Wurlitzer chamber layout. It was not so much a = case >of loud stops in the Solo and soft stops in the Main; more accurately, = the >Main was primarily filled with accompaniment ranks. This was a >simplification of the Hope-Jones idea, which was to have various tonal >families (brass, strings, woodwinds, Diapasons, etc.) housed in their own >chambers. > >I must say--scoff, o ye purists of both camps--that a non-unit theater = organ >would be a wonderful device indeed. Having a separate rank for each pitch = of >a Tibia, for example--every one scaled and regulated to blend best with = its >fellows--would be far nicer than deriving every pitch from a single rank. >Ditto strings, reeds and everything else. If I had the time, space and >resources to build up an 80-rank theater organ, that's what I'd want to = do, >not simply amass a huge pile of 8' ranks that electronics allowed me to >access at several pitches. Sen. Richards' Kimball in Atlantic City >(mentioned before) is a good example of what theater organs could be, >finances willing. I only wish Wurlitzer had built such instruments. > >The unit organ--which I love--was created as a matter of expediency. It = does >indeed allow more tonal variety (not all of it good!) than a straight = organ >of equal size, but its primary reason for being was financial, not = artistic. >It's a way of getting more for less, and if it has definite tonal = failings, >as it does, those weaknesses aren't particularly noticeable unless = someone >chooses to play Bach on one for a roomful of trained ears. > >Ray > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >  
(back) Subject: Re: oboe vs. cornopean vs. trumpet vs. clarinet vs. crumhorn vs. kazoo-en-chamade, etc. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 10:34:49 PDT     >It ain't the stop-name that counts, it's the VOICING.   Well, but it should be. If I want to get something that sounds like a clarinet, I want the stop to be called CLARINET not "vox varuna" = not "cremona" not "forest horn" and not "Klarinyeteijckz"   This is why imitative organ stops are such a joke in classical organs -- they can be defined by the builder to be almost anything. Now I have = heard some decent cornopeans and it is a distinctive hornlike sound. On the = other hand I have heard trumpets of all kinds ranging from pipes that emit reedy =   buzzy blasts to pipes that emit tones very much like a real trumpet. Now the various spellings "trumpet vs. trompette vs. fanfare trumpet" etc do help but not much.   Come on, Audsley pointed this out 100 years ago. Clear, consistent standardized stop names.   The only truly good stop names are on theater organs where there is an incentive to make an imitative stop imitate what it's supposed to imitate, =   and not just cook up a familiar name for yet another "odd or curious" reed =   which while musically useful, is NOT imitative.   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: salaries From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 14:00:42 -0400   Correct, unless you want the very best ones, in which case be advised that they are booked as much as three or four YEARS ahead. And if you want = such things as tympani, harps, etc., consider the cartage costs ($75 each way, = or thereabouts).   Alan   > From: Quilisma@socal.rr.com > Subject: salaries > > Alan's right about the brasses ... they cost at LEAST $400 a gig, and = you'd > better book them in the summer for the following Easter! >    
(back) Subject: linguistic soup From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 11:03:35 -0700   I agree ... my point was that a Schalmei can be made as a good all-purpose = reed.   I have railed against silly multi-lingual stoplists for years ... mostly = it gets me flamed (grin).   My contention is that if you want a French trompette, then specify = Cavaille-Coll shallots on the contract and put "French Trumpet" on the stop-knob.   If I ever get round to having an organ built for St. Matthew's, TONALLY it = will be English with a French accent (or vice versa), but the STOP-NAMES will = be in ENGLISH, insofar as that is possible. No, I'm not going to put "Human = Voice" on the Vox Humana stop-knob (grin). But it will have grave, full and acute mixtures, etc. and trumpets and trombones, rather than bombardes and = trompettes.   Cheers,   Bud   "Dave G." wrote:   > >It ain't the stop-name that counts, it's the VOICING. > > Well, but it should be. If I want to get something that sounds > like a clarinet, I want the stop to be called CLARINET not "vox varuna" = not > "cremona" not "forest horn" and not "Klarinyeteijckz" > > This is why imitative organ stops are such a joke in classical organs -- > they can be defined by the builder to be almost anything. Now I have = heard > some decent cornopeans and it is a distinctive hornlike sound. On the = other > hand I have heard trumpets of all kinds ranging from pipes that emit = reedy > buzzy blasts to pipes that emit tones very much like a real trumpet. = Now > the various spellings "trumpet vs. trompette vs. fanfare trumpet" etc do > help but not much. > > Come on, Audsley pointed this out 100 years ago. Clear, consistent > standardized stop names. > > The only truly good stop names are on theater organs where there is an > incentive to make an imitative stop imitate what it's supposed to = imitate, > and not just cook up a familiar name for yet another "odd or curious" = reed > which while musically useful, is NOT imitative. > > DG > > ________________________________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Expensive brass. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 11:07:02 PDT     >Alan's right about the brasses ... they cost at LEAST $400 a gig, you'd >better book them in the summer for the following Easter!   Ahem! getting back to organs, buy a good quality imitative trumpet stop = for your organ that really sounds like a trumpet, not some imaginative = builder's idea of "the essence of trumpethood" Only a few Easters and it will pay for itself. Plus you'll have it available for =   Christmas too!   Religion is theater, think like an old-time theater owner.   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: adding a reed stop From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 14:45:20 EDT   In a message dated 5/24/00 1:51:10 AM Eastern Daylight Time, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   > Oooh goody! Does it have a horseshoe console?? I need one to go along > with my logo that bReWsE made 4 me! hehehehhe! I have a photo of a horseshoe console that would be perfect for your = organ. It's in an RC store in Vergennes VT. The "carpenter" was feeling either frisky or stupid (or was watching cartoons) when he made the music rack, because it has Mickey Mouse ears on it. I'll search out the photo and = put it on my web page soon.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Noodles in the Subbass From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 14:45:22 EDT   In a message dated 5/24/00 7:30:30 AM Eastern Daylight Time, = rringram@syr.edu writes:   > John, I am ROFLMAO. And I thought bats were bad!! > Cooked or uncooked???   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: oboe vs. cornopean From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 14:45:21 EDT   In a message dated 5/24/00 5:39:10 AM Eastern Daylight Time, dave_hat@hotmail.com writes:   > On the other hand, well, everyone has an oboe. Here an oboe, there an oboe, > > everywhere an oboe oboe oboe. > If you want a reedy reed rather than a hornlike reed, another = possibility > would be a Crumhorn.   I agree here. If I have an option for an Oboe, it would be a Cromorne. = In fact, a Cromorne from tenor C or G would be very handy if the boot were = the same size at the Oboe. It could be kept on its own little storage rack in =   the chamber so that it could be easily switched. It probably would not = even have to be tuned if carefully handled. This would be a very inexpensive = way to have two reeds.   At one OHS convention we heard an organ (Johnson, I think) that had a = Fagotto & Cremona stop. One to 17 were Fagotto and 18 up were Cremona. The = voice made the transition from Fagotto to Cremona absolutely beautifully, and = quite like the move from a Clarinet to a Bassoon in an orchestra.   I have learned so much from OHS. Convention on its way... SIGN UP!   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: oboe vs. cornopean From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 14:45:24 EDT   In a message dated 5/24/00 7:55:23 AM Eastern Daylight Time, jlspeller@stlnet.com writes:   > At Quimby Pipe Organs we have started using a Cromorne (ours is a fairly > large scale, based on a Skinner Clarinet and tends more to a Clarinet > than a Krummhorn, sounding nice and woody in the bass) as the Swell = reed > on small organs, and this seems to work very well. The problem with = the > Oboe is that often it is NOT interesting (in spite of what G. Donald > Harrison said to the contrary!) On a larger instrument, there is > nothing like a Cornopean, however, for making a nice fat Full Swell > sound!   But then, remember that Willis sometimes used a 16 Clarinet in his Swell = for the weight in his reed chorus. This works very well, providing a unique colour and sufficient weight, and also gives another solo stop.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Noodles in the Subbass From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 14:45:25 EDT   In a message dated 5/24/00 9:27:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time, dutchorgan@svs.net writes:   > What!! -no maranara sauce? Well, maybe if it had been an RC church.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Expensive brass. From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 12:09:11 -0700   That's fine, but I'm not David Craighead (grin), who could simultaneously = carry on a conversation, make out his grocery list and play the Reger "Morning = Star" without missing a note.   I only have two hands and two feet, and if a piece is scored for choir, independent organ part with pedals and an independent brass quartet, then = it NEEDS an independent brass quartet, or whatever.   Sure, I play Elgar's "The Spirit of the Lord" without an orchestra, but = I'd rather NOT (grin).   The ONLY organ trumpet I ever heard that sounded like a real orchestral = trumpet was the big horn in the back of St. John the Divine in NYC ... I = understand GDH had a trumpeter from the NY Phil stand in the loft and play for him so he = could get a sense of what he wanted to build ... but something like THAT has = VERY limited usefulness in the average church.   Most brass parts are best left to brass PLAYERS.   Cheers,   Bud   "Dave G." wrote:   > >Alan's right about the brasses ... they cost at LEAST $400 a gig, you'd > >better book them in the summer for the following Easter! > > Ahem! getting back to organs, buy a good quality imitative trumpet stop = for > your organ that really sounds like a trumpet, not some imaginative = builder's > idea of "the essence of trumpethood" Only a > few Easters and it will pay for itself. Plus you'll have it available = for > Christmas too! > > Religion is theater, think like an old-time theater owner. > > DG > > ________________________________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: God Bless America From: <ORGANUT@aol.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 15:27:32 EDT   Hey Gang, I have a request. Does anyone have the song ,"God Bless America" with = the introduction. Sometimes when this song is played there will be a short introduction. The recording by Kate Smith has her singing the intro. I have the music in a book of Irving Berlin songs. God Bless America = is in the key of F, but without the intro. I recall hearing Lew Williams use = the intro when he played "G-B-A" at the 7th Street Pizza parlor in Phoenix. I would greatly appreciate someone emailing me a copy. I will need it before Sunday.   Thanks, Phil Lyons Jr.  
(back) Subject: Re: Expensive brass. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 13:00:29 PDT       >The ONLY organ trumpet I ever heard that sounded like a real >orchestral >trumpet was the big horn in the back of St. John the >Divine in NYC ...   With any luck my nascent reedless trumpet pipes will be very realistic and loud!   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: early pipe organs in theatres From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 18:26:37 EDT   In a message dated 05/24/2000 10:02:38 AM Pacific Daylight Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes: I noticed the post in the digest today:   > Ray Thursby" <raythursby@earthlink.net> > Date: Tue, 23 May 2000 20:29:34 -0700 > > When talking about theater organs, it should be noted that the earliest > instruments installed in theaters were not necessarily unit organs. = There > were Kimballs, Esteys and many others that differed little (if at all) = from > standard church/concert design. No doubt some had fancier consoles; the = few > examples I've seen (in photos) don't even go that far. Some even had > drawknobs rather than stopkeys....   Indeed, this is quite true- in fact, I played this last weekend upon what =   was represented to me as the second oldest example of a pipe organ = installed in a theatre in the U.S.- the Steere and Turner Opus 300 tracker installed = in the Mabel Tainter Memorial Theatre in Menomonie, WI in 1896. The = instrument has 1,597 pipes, was fully restored in the 1980's and is well documented = by members of the Organ Historical Society. I'm told the first pipe organ in = a U.S. theatre was somewhere in Chicago.   Dennis James House Organist: Paramount Theatre, Seattle / El Capitan Theatre, Hollywood = / Symphony Hall, San Diego  
(back) Subject: Re: linguistic soup From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> Date: Thu, 25 May 2000 00:28:18 +0100     ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Subject: linguistic soup     > I have railed against silly multi-lingual stoplists for years ... mostly it gets > me flamed (grin).   Can't think why that should be, seems perfectly reasonable to me. We SHOULD insist that a Danish organ builder, building a French style organ, for a Lutheran church, labels all the stops in American English. Who needs variety or ambiguity in their lives? Nobody, of course - make it all the same, do away with individuality, take away the anticipation aspect of drawing stops on an unfamiliar organ.   Why give names to stops at all? Just give'em numbers, then, wherever you are in the U.S of A., ('cos nobody else in the world is going to take you seriously, no more'n what I does), you can just draw half the even numbers and a couple of odd ones, and there you go - acoustic standard #1 ....... or #4 .... or something equally boring.   Nope, I can't think of any reason why you should be flamed for your advocacy of standardisation, even if it would be stultifyingly, terminally, overweeningly boring. It's your dead horse, and you are fully entitled to flog it.   <grin grin grin - look, I'm smiling, really I am ....... honest)   Chris B      
(back) Subject: Re: linguistic soup From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 16:56:54 -0700   My minor was English ... words have MEANING (or at least they're SUPPOSED to) ... my point is simply this: French organs have French stop-names, WHATEVER sound they're connected to (German prinzipal, French montre, Italian principale, etc.); German organs have German stop-names, etc. ... it seems that it's only in English-speaking countries that we have French Swells, American Classic Greats, German Positives, and Heinz 57 Pedals.   I agree that an argument can be made that a Montre SOUNDS different from a Prinzipal, and therefore should be so labeled. Fine ... in FRANCE. On the other hand, "Double Flute" conveys the same meaning to me as "Doppelfloete" ... and there's nothing wrong with calling a stop "French Diapason" or "German Diapason" ... hundreds of American organs of the '20s had an "English Diapason" on the Choir organ (a libelous appellation, if there ever was one!).   Your Danish builder, BUILDING IN DENMARK, does NOT use AMERICAN stop-names (grin). So why should he use Danish names when he builds in America?   Come on now ... does a swell with the following REALLY make any SENSE??!!   16' Bazuin 8' Trompette 8' Hobo 8' Something-or-other Regal 4' Clarin Real   It SHOULD be:   16' Bassoon 8' Trumpet 8' Oboe 8' Vox Humana (I'm just weird enough to PUT "Ghostly Voices" or "Housekeeper's Cat" on the knob) (grin) 4' Clarion   And if a builder HAS mixed all those national tonal styles, then no further comment is necessary.   Cheers,   Bud       Chris Baker wrote:   > ----- Original Message ----- > From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> > Subject: linguistic soup > > > I have railed against silly multi-lingual stoplists for years ... > mostly it gets > > me flamed (grin). > > Can't think why that should be, seems perfectly reasonable to me. We > SHOULD insist that a Danish organ builder, building a French style > organ, for a Lutheran church, labels all the stops in American > English. Who needs variety or ambiguity in their lives? > Nobody, of course - make it all the same, do away with individuality, > take away the anticipation aspect of drawing stops on an unfamiliar > organ. > > Why give names to stops at all? Just give'em numbers, then, wherever > you are in the U.S of A., ('cos nobody else in the world is going to > take you seriously, no more'n what I does), you can just draw half > the even numbers and a couple of odd ones, and there you go - acoustic > standard #1 ....... or #4 .... or something equally boring. > > Nope, I can't think of any reason why you should be flamed for your > advocacy of standardisation, even if it would be stultifyingly, > terminally, overweeningly boring. It's your dead horse, and you are > fully entitled to flog it. > > <grin grin grin - look, I'm smiling, really I am ....... honest) > > Chris B > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: New Raven CDs From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 20:02:10 -0400   Four new CDs from Raven are now listed at http://www.ravencd.com   They are:   OAR-500 The Mendelssohn Organ, James Hammann plays all six sonatas, the three preludes and fugues, and several other works in a 2-CD set for the price of one   OAR-490 Susan Moeser Plays Bedient Op. 59 at St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Parish, Omaha, recreating the recital she played in this resonant space on this new organ for the AGO Regional last summer.   OAR-480 Martin Jean Plays the Valparaiso University Organ. This CD was previously noted to the list   OAR-470 George Ritchie Plays J. S. Bach, Volume 4 "Foreign Influences" He plays two organs built in the 18th century style of Zacharias Hildebrandt and Gottfried Silbermann: the recent Fritz Noack organ at Christ the King Ev. Lutheran Church, Houston, Texas, and the Munetaka Yokota organ at California State University, Chico. This is a 2-CD set for the price of one.   These CDs are available directly from Raven http://www.ravencd.com, from OHS http://www.ohscatalog.org, and from Gothic Records but not on their website as yet http://www.gothicrecords.com   Bill      
(back) Subject: Re: oboe vs. cornopean From: <JKVDP@aol.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 20:01:15 EDT   Why limit it to one or the other? Instead go MIDI, with an Allen = Expander II and audio system resulting in daily CHOICE of Oboe or French = Trompette, or English Tuba, or Krummhorn or Vox Humana, or French Horn, or Clarinet, = or any of 50 other pipe voices. Pipeless in Seattle  
(back) Subject: Re: linguistic soup From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 17:27:14 PDT     I don't think that's the point.   If a name refers to a more-or-less standard imitative sound (e.g. = Clarinet, Oboe, Hohlflute, etc) then that name should be reserved for pipes that = emit a timbre recognizeable as such. Yes, we don't want cookie cutter waveforms issuing from every clarinet in the land, and this = is of course not the case with orchestral instruments, but there can't be = such wide variation as to render the names meaningless.   Now suppose you want something like what was suggested for the person = trying to decide trumpet vs. cornopean, something like a soft trumpet or loud = oboe, label the stop "oboe trumpet" (theater organs has no shortage of "oboe = horn" and "horn diapason" stops) so we can at least guess what it will sound = like from the stoplist description. Or give it a label that distinguishes it (e.g. minor cornopean) with relatively international and unambiguous meaning.   Finally if you want to put an entirely new tone color in your instrument which you are SURE has not been used before, then make up a name for it, and here you can get creative. Examples: kinura, vox ursae, panopean, = etc. But honestly there are so many stop names already out there (e.g. see = Irwin) that this case should be rare.   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: oboe vs. cornopean From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 17:36:52 PDT     >Why limit it to one or the other? Instead go MIDI, with an Allen = Expander >II and audio system resulting in daily CHOICE of Oboe or French = Trompette, >or English Tuba, or Krummhorn or Vox Humana, or French Horn, or = Clarinet, >or any of 50 other pipe voices.   <sarcasm>   Indeed. Why not go completely MIDI, send all the existing pipes off to = the recycler... bet someone needs scrap tin. May I also propose tomatoes so genetically engineered that they are indistinguishable from oranges. And with enough artifical flavorings and a good dose of MSG we can make any of =   50 different varieties of pastry from lard and sawdust at a fraction of = the cost and hassle.   </sarcasm>   DG   Computer scientist in defense of the real. ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: oboe vs. cornopean vs. little Martians-in-black-boxes From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 17:56:07 -0700   Well, I suppose with such a small pipe organ with such limited resources, digital could be a possibility.   Cheers,   Bud   JKVDP@aol.com wrote:   > Why limit it to one or the other? Instead go MIDI, with an Allen = Expander > II and audio system resulting in daily CHOICE of Oboe or French = Trompette, > or English Tuba, or Krummhorn or Vox Humana, or French Horn, or = Clarinet, > or any of 50 other pipe voices. > Pipeless in Seattle > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org