PipeChat Digest #1422 - Saturday, May 27, 2000
 
Re: Lorenz tracker organ
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Redux: direct electric vs. electro-pneumatic
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Digital Voices
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Digital Voices
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Digital Voices
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Lorenz tracker organ
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: linguistic soup
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
And the Organ played on and on and on (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Do you have the text of your music policy brochoure?
  by "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Organ Terms (of Endearment)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: And the Organ played on and on and on (x post)
  by <Posthorn8@aol.com>
Re: Digital Voices
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Digital Voices
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
What is a real Crumhorn?
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Lorenz organ
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: And the Organ played on and on and on (x post)
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: dead zimberstern
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
adding a reed
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
ALLEN TRAPS CABINET
  by <Musmachns@aol.com>
Re: ALLEN TRAPS CABINET
  by <GHamil9709@aol.com>
Re: Digital Voices
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: What is a real Crumhorn?
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: linguistic soup
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Organist
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Fw: Digital Voices
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Fw: Digital Voices
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Digital Voices
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
off-topic question
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Fw: Digital Voices
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: The very best Aeolian Skinner
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Lorenz tracker organ From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 05:15:03 -0500   At 4:46 PM -0700 5/26/00, quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: >Stoplist??? Twelve ranks, or is it six ranks divided? Do they use it, or = do >they wanna get rid of it??? > >Anybody ever heard of Lorenz, the organ-builder? Thought most of the = tri-state >area was Koehnken & Grimm ...   According to the Fox Guide to North American Organbuilders, Joseph Lorenz was active in the Cincinnati OH area c. 1868 - c. 1879. Also had a patent for a reed pipe.   David    
(back) Subject: Re: Redux: direct electric vs. electro-pneumatic From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 10:03:44 -0400       Bob Scarborough wrote: > > Wrong again. A 5ESS at 25% load factor draws 10% of the current that a > comparable #5 Crossbar switch did just sitting there, doing nothing! = The > consumption factors get more favorable as the switch is loaded. > ent.<snip> > Yep technology marches on. Many years ago I was in an ATT Longlines site underground. It had been predecated on a fairly accurate growth in telephone usage. What they hadn't planned for was the drastic size reduction in equipment. This facility was two floors the size of football fields of which only 1/4 of one was in use. Originally three turbine diesel generators were in place to provide the power, two were subsequently removed and most of the fuel, purchased at 8 cents a gallon was sold/transferred elsewhere.  
(back) Subject: Digital Voices From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 12:01:15 EDT   Following this same topic line, How would one classify an instrument with chimes? ....with Zimbelstern? ...with a harp or marimba? Just thought I'd toss that aspect into the fray. Smokin' Stan Krider     Bob Elms recently added : <snip> I can't agree with this. We have a pipe organ with some electronic reeds = on the pedal, but without those additions it is a complete pipe organ. It is a = pipe organ with a few digital additions. Nothing can change that. Bob E.  
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Voices From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 09:20:02 -0700   Apples and persimmons, Smokin' ... percussions are almost as old as the = organ .... remember, Bach wanted CHIMES in the PEDAL in that rebuild he wrote up = (AND a better TREMULANT) (grin).   Spanish baroque organs had drums and bird-calls ... where was Messiaen = when you needed him (grin)?   Cheers,   Creakin' Bud-by-the-Beach   KriderSM@aol.com wrote:   > Following this same topic line, How would one classify an instrument = with > chimes? > ...with Zimbelstern? ...with a harp or marimba? > Just thought I'd toss that aspect into the fray. > Smokin' > Stan Krider > > Bob Elms recently added : > <snip> > I can't agree with this. We have a pipe organ with some electronic reeds = on > the > pedal, but without those additions it is a complete pipe organ. It is a = pipe > organ with a few digital additions. Nothing can change that. > Bob E. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Voices From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 09:16:38   At 12:01 PM 5/27/2000 EDT, you wrote: >Following this same topic line, How would one classify an instrument with =   >chimes? >...with Zimbelstern? ...with a harp or marimba? >Just thought I'd toss that aspect into the fray.<snip>   Yes, quite excellent, Stan! Now, all organs containing those clangy thingies must be called "Zimblestern-augmented organs", if we are to = follow the "tracker-backer" logic thus presented.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Lorenz tracker organ From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 11:43:36 -0500   Bud wrote, in part:     > ...<snip>... But a Lorenz organ in a Catholic church WOULD be strange = ... > German > Catholics and German Protestants didn't SPEAK to one another back then > (grin).   Well this is not entirely true. Congregations of the Evangelical Synod of = the West, and its successor, the Evangelical and Reformed Church, because of = the location of (one of) the seminaries of this denomination in St. Louis, = often bought Kilgen instruments. One of the most intriguing instruments I ever personally played was a 2M Kilgen tracker located in a UCC (formerly E&R, formerly ESW) parish church in the NW Chicago suburbs. Original = installation was for a hand pumped instruments, and although a blower was installed on = the instrument, when it was refurbished about a dozen years ago, the hand = pumping mechanism was also restored.   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: linguistic soup From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 12:25:18 -0500   John Vanderlee wrote: > > Another question in/on this thread: > > I often read "Cromorne" > > Now is that merely a bastardisation of the the Dutch: "Krom hoorn" or = the > German: "Krumm horn"? Which in both cases means "crooked horn" > If "Cromorne" is indeed used for that stop, and sticking with linguistic > correctness, would not "crook horn" or "curved horn" be more correct?   Krummhorn is German Kromhoorn is Dutch Cromorne is French Crumhorn or (on organs) Cremona is English   This is a medieval instrument which the organ stop was seen as imitative of. You can give the name in any language you choose, though there is a difference in the characteristic sounds on organs built in different countries.   The German Krummhorn is at one extreme rather pungent and buzzy. The Dutch Kromhoorn is softer, less pungent but still buzzy. The English Cremona is rather sweeter and not particularly pungent or buzzy. It is somewhere between a Krummhorn and Clarinet. The French Cromorne is also somewhere between a Clarinet and a Krummhorn and has a certain singing quality and edge to it.   If you use them properly, therefore, the different national names for this stop vcan convey subtle differences in timbre.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: And the Organ played on and on and on (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 13:34:52 EDT   We just had the wedding from hell here at the National Shrine of the = Little Flower. Yes that is a figure of speech and an attempt at humour.   Typical wedding scenario: very nervous young bride to be, daily (almost hourly) phone calls to the music office for the past 6 months it seems in preparation for this one.   Phone call to music office from nervous young bride to be the day before = the rehearsal asking the amounts of checks for musicians and where (and when) = to leave them, despite the fact that it is clearly printed TWICE in bold and italics in the music policy brochure.   Day of wedding arrives- processional starts and the grooms men follow the priest and altar boys out of the sacristy. They keep coming out and = coming out and coming out. My assistant and I dont play rehearsals (thank GOD) = so we dont see these things ahead of time. So they keep marching out and marching out and marching out and the organ played. My soloists eyes got = as big as baseballs at the numbers of people entering the Sanctuary from the Sacristy. Finally she got up and said "I have to go over there and watch this one!" (Referring to the onslaught of bedecked brides maids and attendants etc.   The groomsmen walked around the south side of the circular Communion rail = to meet the brides maids and escort them in. Purcell's "Trumpet Tune in D Major" was the selection for this. We finally discovered that there were THIRTEEN groomsmen, THIRTEEN brides maids, FOUR flower girls, TWO ring bearers, a junior brides maids and the matron of honor. And the organ = played on and on...........finally we went into Wagner for the bridal procession.   I have NEVER played a piece that many times over with that many repeats. Let's hear it for improvisation!!!!!!   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Do you have the text of your music policy brochoure? From: "Charles & Maria DeVita-Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 13:54:59 -0400   ScottFop@aol.com wrote:   > Phone call to music office from nervous young bride to be the day before = the > rehearsal asking the amounts of checks for musicians and where (and = when) to > leave them, despite the fact that it is clearly printed TWICE in bold = and > italics in the music policy brochure.   I'm not at all interested in the money, but the wording of the policy = would be helpful.   I've always worked in small churches where it was left more or less to me. Something in writing would be way helpful     Charles    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Terms (of Endearment) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 13:03:38 -0500   Cremona502@cs.com wrote: > > In a message dated 5/25/00 4:59:11 PM Eastern Daylight Time, > desertbob@rglobal.net writes: > > > >A recent symposium held that even the bottom 12 electronic notes of a = 32' > bourdon > > make a pipe organ NOT a pipe organ. Comments? (grin)<snip> > > > > Typical crockery. > > Are you saying that these people are psychoceramic??? ;-)   .... or perhaps the digital basses were Made in China.   John.  
(back) Subject: Re: And the Organ played on and on and on (x post) From: <Posthorn8@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 14:12:55 EDT   In a message dated 5/27/00 1:36:58 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = ScottFop@aol.com writes:   << We finally discovered that there were THIRTEEN groomsmen, THIRTEEN brides maids, FOUR flower girls, TWO ring bearers, a junior brides maids and the matron of honor. >>   AND A PARTRIDGE IN A PEARTREE!!  
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Voices From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 13:52:20 -0500   KriderSM@aol.com wrote: > > Following this same topic line, How would one classify an instrument = with > chimes? > ...with Zimbelstern? ...with a harp or marimba?   Yesterday I came across an organ with a Zimbelstern that no longer works. Would one call a dead Zimbel star a Zimbel red dwarf?   John.  
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Voices From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 12:08:15 PDT     >Following this same topic line, How would one classify an instrument with >chimes? >...with Zimbelstern? ...with a harp or marimba?   Well, a "true" organ doesn't have percussion. I tolerate them in theater organs because they do give some interesting sounds. But that is not the same as digital voices... at least chimes are real objects with real acoustic character, not just beeps coming out of some computer chip.   Chimes: I can live without them. Marimba: I'd prefer a Kalimba stop :-) Harp: that is OK. The idea of making a harp out of thin wood bars is at least novel. Zimbelstern: noisy tinkly little piece of garbage with no musical value whatever. No organ I would ever buy, build or spec. would ever have one. Xylophone: Probably the dorkiest instrument ever invented. If used more often than once a year, a Xylophone stop instantly turns the most serious organ into a trite and junky sort of carousel organ. Not that I don't = like carousel organs (I do) but that's not a modern dignified sound. = Especially the multi-strike action variety.   DG ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: What is a real Crumhorn? From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 12:17:53 PDT   Hi everyone,   >Crumhorn or (on organs) Cremona is English   Crumhorn is the proper spelling in English.   Cremona is a city in Italy. "Cremona" first appeared on cheap and trashy reed organs in the 19th century meant to be played by Victorian-era = dowdies who didn't know a Crumhorn from a shoehorn. Very messed-up era in lots of ways.   >The German Krummhorn is at one extreme rather pungent and buzzy. >The Dutch Kromhoorn is softer, less pungent but still buzzy.   IMNSHO, This is the sound we want to call Crumhorn.   Given the proclivity of organ builders to voice reeds all over the map, there is no real distinction between a Clarinet and one of these sweet English "Cremona" thingies.   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Lorenz organ From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 12:05:29 -0700   Well, that's what guessing will get you ... grin ... although I still wonder if John (Johann?) Lorenz was related to the Dayton Lorenz family (founders of the publishing co.).   Odd that I never heard of that organ ... I thought I'd tramped through most of the old churches in the tri-state area.   Tom Cunningham never mentioned it ... he knew where MOST of the old organs were, though I did find an undocumented K & G in old Holy Trinity (Bohemian) RC in Cleveland ... think the church got torn down ... the organist was supposed to remove the organ, but never heard anything further about it. It was a small two-manual, with everything in German on the stop-knobs. Logical, for a GERMAN church (evil grin).   Does anyone know if the historic Holtkamp in St. John's RC (Covington, KY) still exists? Big brick church ... you can see it from the Interstate right after you cross the bridge ...   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: And the Organ played on and on and on (x post) From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 12:21:13 PDT     >We finally discovered that there were >THIRTEEN groomsmen, THIRTEEN brides maids, FOUR flower girls, TWO >ring >bearers, a junior brides maids and the matron of honor.   Ah the traditional wedding... snort, chuckle, smirk.   Two ring bearers? You need more than that if you're a polygamist. :-D   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: dead zimberstern From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 12:23:11 PDT     >Yesterday I came across an organ with a Zimbelstern that no longer >works. Would one call a dead Zimbel star a Zimbel red dwarf?   I'd call it "good riddance", and toss it into the nearest black hole.   DG     ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: adding a reed From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Fri, 26 May 2000 04:15:29 -0500   HI list, Thank you for all of your comments about what reed to add to the Pilcher. I was thinking of a Cornopean because it does have a round sound to it. The oboes that I have played are IMHO rather bland. Maybe because of the Hinners influence here in central Il. Thanks again. Gary      
(back) Subject: ALLEN TRAPS CABINET From: <Musmachns@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 17:19:07 EDT   HELP! I have a 1968 3 manual Theater 3 Deluxe Allen, and it's missing the traps cabinet. I know these don't have a very good sound, but would like to = make the organ complete. It is 3 manuals, 2 swells + crescendo, moving stops and setter board combinations, 3 speaker cabinets with newer amplifiers. I either need to get it running or sell it.   Also have a 3 manual Rodgers Trio w/ 2 speaker cabinets playing. Need to sell one of these. Thanks Andy Struble Traverse City, Michigan  
(back) Subject: Re: ALLEN TRAPS CABINET From: <GHamil9709@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 17:53:26 EDT   Andy Struble --- get in touch with me privately at:   Ghamil9709?@aol.com   I may be able to help you. Gene Hamilton    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Voices From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 17:00:25 -0500   Dave G. wrote:   >Well, a "true" organ doesn't have percussion.     Organs have had "percussion" stops for centuries, percussion stops were not an invention that came along with the theatre organ. Bach was very familiar with Cymbelsterns and Glockenspiels in the organs of his time. There were other instruments from "ancient' times that contained drums, nightingales, and other "toy-counter" stops. And I would call all of these that I am referring to "true" organs!   David    
(back) Subject: Re: What is a real Crumhorn? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 18:36:06 -0500   Dave G. wrote: > > Hi everyone, > > >Crumhorn or (on organs) Cremona is English > > Crumhorn is the proper spelling in English. > > Cremona is a city in Italy. "Cremona" first appeared on cheap and = trashy > reed organs in the 19th century meant to be played by Victorian-era = dowdies > who didn't know a Crumhorn from a shoehorn. > Very messed-up era in lots of ways.   Not actually true. The name Cremona is found as an organ stop in England as long ago as the seventeenth century -- e.g. the St. Paul's Cathedral organ in London in 1696. The name is, nevertheless, a rather messed up version of Crumhorn, and caused considerable confusion. Some eighteenth-century organists thought that it was related to Cremona in Italy and meant to imitate a Stradivarius violin. > >The German Krummhorn is at one extreme rather pungent and buzzy. > >The Dutch Kromhoorn is softer, less pungent but still buzzy. > > IMNSHO, This is the sound we want to call Crumhorn.   Perhaps this is nearer to the medieval instrument, but except with strictly "Orchestral" style organs, stops are not meant to be exact imitations of the instruments they are named after. In the case of the Krummhorn the Cromorne, Cremona, etc., designations are useful in describing slightly different stops. Similarly 8' Principal can be used for a bright rank, Open Diapason for a richer more fundamental sound, and Montre for a big beefy sound -- describing the characteristics of what is basically the same stop in the national style of three different countries. I think the name on the stop should describe the noise it makes. > Given the proclivity of organ builders to voice reeds all over the map, > there is no real distinction between a Clarinet and one of these sweet > English "Cremona" thingies.   That tended to be the case after about 1850, but before that date in England the Cremona was a distinct timbre, kind of halfway between a Clarinet and a German Krummhorn. The same is also true of some more recent examples produced by recent American and English organ builders. Some of these have been of Rohr Schalmei construction.   None of the above should, of course, be confused with the Cream Horn, which is a delicious confection beloved of organists <g>.   John.  
(back) Subject: Re: linguistic soup From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 19:54:11 EDT   In a message dated 5/27/00 1:28:04 PM Eastern Daylight Time, jlspeller@stlnet.com writes:   > rather pungent John.... Have you been sipping mint juleps and reading Stevens Irwin again??? ;-)   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Organist From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 20:13:57 EDT   A name came up in discussion today, and I was wondering if anyone happen = to know Keith Langworthy, who was a student of Lucy Baily in the late 1940s = in Marietta GA.   Thanky.     Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Fw: Digital Voices From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 19:15:19 -0500   Some people just cannot enjoy the lighter side of organs. Such a snub-nose he is!   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Dave G. <dave_hat@hotmail.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2000 2:08 PM Subject: Re: Digital Voices     > > >Following this same topic line, How would one classify an instrument = with > >chimes? > >...with Zimbelstern? ...with a harp or marimba? > > Well, a "true" organ doesn't have percussion. I tolerate them in > theater organs because they do give some interesting sounds. But > that is not the same as digital voices... at least chimes are real > objects with real acoustic character, not just beeps coming out of > some computer chip. > > Chimes: I can live without them. > Marimba: I'd prefer a Kalimba stop :-) > Harp: that is OK. The idea of making a harp out of thin > wood bars is at least novel. > Zimbelstern: noisy tinkly little piece of garbage with no musical value > whatever. No organ I would ever buy, build or spec. would ever have = one. > Xylophone: Probably the dorkiest instrument ever invented. If used = more > often than once a year, a Xylophone stop instantly turns the most = serious > organ into a trite and junky sort of carousel organ. Not that I don't like > carousel organs (I do) but that's not a modern dignified sound. Especially > the multi-strike action variety. > > DG > ________________________________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Fw: Digital Voices From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 19:18:00 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2000 1:52 PM Subject: Re: Digital Voices     > KriderSM@aol.com wrote: > > > > Following this same topic line, How would one classify an instrument with > > chimes? > > ...with Zimbelstern? ...with a harp or marimba? > Silly boy! Orgel mit Percushin!     > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Voices From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 21:42:39 -0400     ----- Original Message ----- From: VEAGUE <dutchorgan@svs.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2000 8:18 PM Subject: Fw: Digital Voices   > > > Following this same topic line, How would one classify an instrument > with > > > chimes? > > > ...with Zimbelstern? ...with a harp or marimba? > > > Silly boy! Orgel mit Percushin!   No, no, they're acessories! The builder was acessorising! Usually they're just called bells and whistles!   I know, I know, <groan>.   -Rebekah      
(back) Subject: off-topic question From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 22:08:30 -0400   I know this is waaaaaaay off topic, but I thought I'd give it a shot. Alot of you have music in your libraries that isn't "church" or "classical" in nature, so here goes.......   Anyone out there have the words to a song called "Southtown USA"??? It was made big by a group called the "Dixiebelles" in 1964. The first line goes like "Well I gotta pack my clothes and leave tonight........" Any help = would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Fw: Digital Voices From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 23:04:34 -0500   Hi Rebekah- So be it- bells and whistles they are! Pass the beer and pizza!   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Rebekah Ingram <rringram@syr.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2000 8:42 PM Subject: Re: Digital Voices     > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: VEAGUE <dutchorgan@svs.net> > To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2000 8:18 PM > Subject: Fw: Digital Voices > > > > > Following this same topic line, How would one classify an = instrument > > with > > > > chimes? > > > > ...with Zimbelstern? ...with a harp or marimba? > > > > > Silly boy! Orgel mit Percushin! > > No, no, they're acessories! The builder was acessorising! Usually = they're > just called bells and whistles! > > I know, I know, <groan>. > > -Rebekah > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: The very best Aeolian Skinner From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 11:09:37 -0500   My point is that it is is the first place a much rebuilt organ, which is a = no, no, in some circles, and that it is really Roy Perry's product. This was detailed in Bill's excellent posting. It is a fine sounding organ indeed, if not actually a GDH Aeolian Skinner! Roy   DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 5/26/00 5:55:03 PM Central Daylight Time, > rredman@imagin.net writes: > > << You do know, of course, that this organ was originally a Moller, and = that > there > is still quite a bit of Moller still in it, including windchests and = some > pipes: > That this organ was one of Roy Perry's toys, and that he made additions = and > changes up until near his death! Still like it??? <SNIP> > > What's your point Roy??? It's still the best sounding organ that I've = ever > heard -- it even surpasses the finest English organs that I've heard or > played. And for His sake, what's everyone's beef with Moller????????? > > I may be young, dumb, and full of __m, but I DO know what I like and I = just > don't get your point! I could say something EXTREMELY tacky, but true, = at > this point; however, I'll hold my fingers back and resist the = temptation... > > John > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org