PipeChat Digest #1990 - Monday, April 2, 2001
 
Re: codec?
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: hammond organ
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: codecs and modems
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Hammond for Practice
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Searching for dates
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Music of Franz Schmidt
  by "Mark Quarmby" <markq@flex.com.au>
Re: PipeChat Digest #1989 - 04/02/01
  by "Peter Collings" <Mail@PeterCollings.com>
Re: Voicing the Electroid/Fate of the Famed Hammond
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: Flenthrop For Sale
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
RE: "voicing" the electroid (X-posted)
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Organistic/Traditional Liturgical Music
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Flenthrop For Sale
  by "Patricia A. Blissenbach" <pab@inreach.com>
Re: Favorite Service Repertoire -- Please help
  by "David Carter" <david_n_carter@hotmail.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: codec? From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 02 Apr 2001 02:09:01 -0700   At 07:56 PM 4/1/2001 -0400, you wrote: >Would Desert Bob (or anybody else, for that matter) kindly explain to me = in >non-technical words of one syllable wherein "codec" and "modem" = differ?<snip>   In the 1930s, the acronym "modem" came into use, a contraction of "modulator/demodulator". This was used in FDM multiplexing, to denote an analog/analog function, where voiceband signals were modulated up into "channel group" spectra of 12 to 110 KHz along with 11 others by using carrier tones and selected sideband energy. The first such carrier system =   was the original Type C of 1911, whose appearance was made very shortly after the "invention" (actually theft) of the vacuum tube (valve) by Dr. Lee DeForest in that same year. During the development phase of various "wideband" data modules in the 1950s that would take 56 Kb/s streams and modulate them into PSK analog data tones in the same spectrum, and these were officially called "modems", also, although they didn't actually "modulate" or "demodulate" in the classic sense stated above. Thus, "modem" was, as is "codec" a "catch-all" term....could be analog to = analog, analog to digital, or, the most common in later years, digital to analog.   The term "codec" started surfacing around the 1950s, as Bell Labs started preparing the first working digital carrier system, the Type T of 1959. T =   carrier wound up taking 24 voice channels (in later versions) and coding and decoding them into a non-standard 1.544 Mb/s bitstream for = transmission on short-haul 19 AWG 110 ohm balanced pairs. The rest of the world, = except copy artist Japan, opted for the CCITT standard of 2.048 Mb/s carrying 30 voice channels. The "channel codec" was a big affair by today's standard, =   all discrete germanium transistor topography utilizing TTL methods to handle the digital encoding and decoding...hence, "codec". Thus, we had, at the time, two different "nicknames" for similar functions, but the original nomenclature of "channel modem" stuck around, even into the digital era of T carrier. Production versions of various "D" type channel =   banks mirrored analog practice by called the "codecs", "modems"!   At the same time, Bell Labs, ITT Federal, Fairchild and others were = working on early "dial-up" devices for facsimile, wirephoto and digital data transmission over the analog telephone network. Bell Labs set the standards in the 1960s, and these also came to be called "modems". The reason appears in a paper in "The Bell Telephone Laboratory Journal" in 1964, when it was held by those in the labs at the time that, since T carrier took analog and put it on a digital line, another term should be used to denote the opposite function, and, as reported a certain Dr. William J. McClosky, for reasons that "make no sense at all to us", the term "modem" got recycled and used for THIS application, although "modulation" up to this point had meant the modulating of voiceband signal =   with a carrier tone to produce selected sidebands for analog transmission in a high frequency carrier scheme, such as in Types C, J, K and L and = many others. Thus, we see some lack of discipline already in the application = of such "nicknames".   "Codec", years down the road, made its way into the digital sound processing field in the 1970s, when "codec" again described the device = used to encode incoming analog signals into PAM and thence PCM coded data for storage, as in the commercially successful "Soundsteam" system that produced the memorable Telarc releases. As had happened before, the term got "recycled", this time into "compressor/decompressor" a fairly recent usage, and one that, like "modem" was to the Bell 202, inherently technically incorrect. Of course, industry shill mag publishers like Ziff-Davis don't TELL you all this in their quickly bashed together "glossaries", but such is the history of these two terms, if one cares to do some scholarly research on the subject.   Now ... if we want to look at various papers and journals of the early digital period to flesh this out further, we can do that, too!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: hammond organ From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 02 Apr 2001 02:18:13 -0700   At 09:21 PM 4/1/2001 -0500, you wrote: >Sounds like those 'robotic-looking youths' have been listening to some >well-exposed televangelists we all know!<snip>   Yes, like Hagee? Question du jour: Is a Hagee a scot that eats haggis?   Pondering....   dB    
(back) Subject: Re: codecs and modems From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 02 Apr 2001 02:20:09 -0700   At 08:22 PM 4/1/2001 -0700, you wrote: >I don't know how the popular press got to saying that codecs have = anything >to do with compression, but if you call up a semiconductor manufacturer >and buy a tube of codecs, you'll get chips that do what DesertBob says >they'll do.<snip>   Thank you, sir, and the various others! I think our student has some revision of reference standards to accomplish.   dB    
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond for Practice From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 02 Apr 2001 02:26:58 -0700   At 08:38 PM 4/1/2001 -0700, you wrote: >Hammond-- 12-15 years old, just had serviced (not sure >what this involved) No problems...2 manuals, 25 full >pedals (which is what I wanted for practicing) > >Pull-out rhythm section was added<snip>   First of all, this is an LSI Hammond, built after the era of tonewheels closed in 1974, and they are worthless. This could be the Concorde, or = the Elegante...both junk. Do NOT buy these organs, they are absolute garbage.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Searching for dates From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Mon, 02 Apr 2001 05:54:30 -0500   Good Morning:   Due to a small computer crash I lost the birth/death dates for Marcel Dupre. Also, how many years did he serve at St. Sulpice?   Thanks,   Tom GRegory -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569  
(back) Subject: Music of Franz Schmidt From: "Mark Quarmby" <markq@flex.com.au> Date: Mon, 02 Apr 2001 21:09:10 +1000   There has been quite a lot of discussion on this list about the organ music of Franz Schmidt. I had heard of this composer but never to my knowledge ever heard any of his music. List member Arthur LaMirande very graciously and kindly sent me a copy of his CD recently which contains the 33 minute Chaconne of Schmidt, recorded on the Casavant organ of the Holy Rosary Cathedral in Vancouver. I found this music quite unlike anything else I have heard and rather hard to describe. It is massive "stuff", both in texture and length. There are many changes in registrations with strong contrasts, but then this could be due to the nature of the work, being a Chaconne. The harmony seems much less chromatic than Reger, perhaps more like Rheinberger. I haven't seen a score and am only going on what I have heard on the disc. I wonder why this composer has not received more attention? Perhaps he, like many of the German romantics (except for Liszt= ) have simply gone out of fashion in favour of the French romantics. After all, I'm sure that I'm not the only one to admit that I know far less about Sauer and Walcker organs than I do about Cavaill=E9-Coll organs, even though = I have played organs by all three builders. Some of the recording can be heard on the Internet at http://www.mp3.com/arthurlamirande   Mark    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1989 - 04/02/01 From: "Peter Collings" <Mail@PeterCollings.com> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 13:16:08 +0100   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0007_01C0BB77.14709A00 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   >I am considering an organ listed in the paper >recently. >Hammond-- 12-15 years old, just had serviced (not sure >what this involved) No problems...2 manuals, 25 full >pedals (which is what I wanted for practicing)     >Grandmother bought it new...$1800.00 neg. >(g.mother now deceased)   >What do ya'll think of this? What questions do I need >to ask the seller?   >My husband is an artist and sometimes barters with >folks (artwork instead of cash) and he said he would >try to get it for artwork. Anyway, is that a good >price?     Dear Cindy,   My advice would be to firstly consider what are your practice needs. Do = =3D you generally play on Hammond-style organs, or do you play pipe organs =3D with 32-note pedalboards.=3D20 If you generally play the classical pipe-organ (as it is inappropriately = =3D named) then I would suggest trying to obtain an electronic version of =3D such an instrument. Of course, if your budget is a lot higher (a factor = =3D of ten!), then aiming for a practice pipe organ might be appropriate.   I bought a 2 manual electronic organ, with a 32-note pedalboard. The =3D organ is excellent for practicing most things, but it is good to have =3D something with a piano action nearby, as daily piano exercise cannot be = =3D more strongly emphasised. Having a piano and an organ, I appreciate, is = =3D quite a luxury. Mechanical action organ practice is also essential.   My electronic instrument is some 20+ years old, and I would not really =3D want to give a recital on it. The sound is however, very good for =3D practicing (not as good as a tracker, I know). You can always invest in = =3D getting the organ wired for MIDI, which will allow you attach it to a =3D digital sound box. Effects boxes can also be attached through an =3D external speaker system/amp, and you can neaten up the sound 10 times.   I am a student, my practice organ cost =3DA31000 (close to the cost of =3D your Hammond), and I am going to pick up a 88-note weighted electric =3D keyboard on Tuesday for under =3DA3500.=3D20 Therefore, I would suggest if you are interested in the 'classical' =3D organ then try searching further until you find one. Often, churches =3D have them installed, and they become obsolete, and are given away at a =3D very cheap price.   The Hammond, which I believe has two 61-note manuals (which is also =3D somewhat essential), will be able to give you a degree of practice, =3D although for the pedalboard, some works may be affected; by Widor =3D (guess) Durufle (Carillon, Cathedral Soissons, bar 106 goes to top E) =3D and Bach, believe it or not (Trio Sonata I, middle movement, bar 16, =3D goes up to top Db as a random example). Some other Hammonds have 32-note = =3D pedalboards.   It is all down to your practice needs. I would certainly not attempt to = =3D barter with the seller, especially after the recent death in the family. = =3D I am unclear as to what price is being asked for, I would insist on =3D asking them for a figure.=3D20 You can get more information from www.KeyboardTrader.com, or =3D www.OrganWebRing.com, as there are some relevant details on each. Some =3D of the readers of this list may be able to provide further help.   I hope this is useful. Good Luck!   Sincerely,   Peter Collings   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0007_01C0BB77.14709A00 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3D3Dtext/html;charset=3D3Diso-8859-1 =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3D3DGENERATOR> </HEAD> <BODY> <DIV>&gt;I am considering an organ listed in the=3D20 paper<BR>&gt;recently.<BR>&gt;Hammond-- 12-15 years old, just had =3D serviced (not=3D20 sure<BR>&gt;what this involved) No problems...2 manuals, 25 =3D full<BR>&gt;pedals=3D20 (which is what I wanted for practicing)<BR></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&gt;Grandmother bought it new...$1800.00 neg.<BR>&gt;(g.mother now=3D20 deceased)<BR><BR>&gt;What do ya'll think of this? What questions do I=3D20 need<BR>&gt;to ask the seller?<BR><BR>&gt;My husband is an artist and =3D sometimes=3D20 barters with<BR>&gt;folks (artwork instead of cash) and he said he=3D20 would<BR>&gt;try to get it for artwork. Anyway, is that a=3D20 good<BR>&gt;price?<BR></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>Dear Cindy,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>My advice would be to firstly consider what = =3D are your=3D20 practice needs. Do you generally play on Hammond-style organs, or do you = =3D play=3D20 pipe organs with 32-note pedalboards. </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>If you generally play the classical =3D pipe-organ (as it=3D20 is inappropriately named) then I would suggest trying to obtain an =3D electronic=3D20 version of such an instrument. Of course, if your budget is a lot higher = =3D (a=3D20 factor of ten!), then aiming for a practice pipe organ might be=3D20 appropriate.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>I bought a 2 manual electronic organ, with a = =3D 32-note=3D20 pedalboard. The organ is excellent for practicing most things, but it is = =3D good to=3D20 have something with a piano action nearby, as daily piano exercise =3D cannot be=3D20 more strongly emphasised. Having a piano and an organ, I appreciate, is = =3D quite a=3D20 luxury. Mechanical action organ practice is also essential.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>My electronic instrument is some 20+ years = =3D old, and I=3D20 would not really want to give a recital on it. The sound is however, =3D very good=3D20 for practicing (not as good as a tracker, I know). You can always invest = =3D in=3D20 getting the organ wired for MIDI, which will allow you attach it to a =3D digital=3D20 sound box. Effects boxes can also be attached through an external =3D speaker=3D20 system/amp, and you can neaten up the sound 10 times.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>I am a student, my practice organ cost =3D &pound;1000=3D20 (close to the cost of your Hammond), and I am going to pick up a 88-note = =3D   weighted electric keyboard on Tuesday for under &pound;500. =3D </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>Therefore, I would suggest if you are =3D interested in the=3D20 'classical' organ then try searching further until you find one. Often, = =3D churches=3D20 have them installed, and they become obsolete, and are given away at a =3D very=3D20 cheap price.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>The Hammond, which I believe has two 61-note = =3D manuals=3D20 (which is also somewhat essential), will be able to give you a degree of = =3D   practice, although for the pedalboard, some works may be affected; by =3D Widor=3D20 (guess) Durufle (Carillon, Cathedral Soissons, bar 106 goes to top E) =3D and Bach,=3D20 believe it or not (Trio Sonata I, middle movement, bar 16, goes up to =3D top Db as=3D20 a random example). Some other Hammonds have 32-note =3D pedalboards.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>It is all down to your practice needs. I =3D would=3D20 certainly not attempt to barter with the seller, especially after the =3D recent=3D20 death in the family. I am unclear as to what price is being asked for, I = =3D would=3D20 insist on asking them for a figure. </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>You can get more information from <A=3D20 href=3D3D"http://www.KeyboardTrader.com">www.KeyboardTrader.com</A>, or <A = =3D   href=3D3D"http://www.OrganWebRing.com">www.OrganWebRing.com</A>, as there = =3D are some=3D20 relevant details on each. Some of the readers of this list may be able =3D to=3D20 provide further help.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>I hope this is useful. Good =3D Luck!</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>Sincerely,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DGaramond>Peter Collings</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0007_01C0BB77.14709A00--    
(back) Subject: Re: Voicing the Electroid/Fate of the Famed Hammond From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 06:19:11 -0700 (PDT)   Well, I really think that hearing a great gospel organist playing exciting gospel music on a Hammond B-3 is a wonderful experience. Also, the great jazz organist, Jimmy Smith playing the same instrument is fantastic. Fats Waller on a Hammond is unforgettable..magnificent! Hammonds are important to our culture. Does anyone agree? --- Colin Hulme <colin_hulme@lineone.net> wrote: > > > Bob Scarborough wrote: > > > > At 07:19 AM 4/1/2001 -0400, you wrote: > > >( Not that we organbuilders imbide....) <snip> > > > > Nope...<hick!>....nevur happen, ossifer! > > > > I'm reminded of the passage in Barnes' book on > this very subject. > > > > Or, as we say round here, "good consternoon > aftable" > > Colin. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/?.refer=3Dtext  
(back) Subject: Re: Flenthrop For Sale From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 06:20:32 -0700 (PDT)   Almost none of this is true. --- Bob North <bnorth@intergate.ca> wrote: > St. Mark's Cathedral in Seattle announced tonight > that it has decided to > sell its Flenthrop organ, damaged recently in the > 6.8 earthquake that hit > the Greater Seattle area. Roger Sherman, host of > the Organ Loft program, > heard on KING-FM in Seattle, made this major > announcement on his radio > program. Repairs to the organ have been stopped. > The organ is to be > replaced with an electronic instrument, with MIDI, > and Hammond B-3 > sound The sale should help the Cathedral retire its > debt still owed on the > organ, built in 1965, and allow for the purchase of > new carpets to cover > the cold stone floor. Also planned is the purchase > of a new public address > system so the new Rector's voice could be heard. A > new music program is > also being planned and the future of the 40 year old > tradition of Compline > Service, with its male choir, is in doubt. > > Congrats to Roger Sherman and the crew of the "Organ > Loft" for a > spectactular program, which would only be possible > on THIS day of the year > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/?.refer=3Dtext  
(back) Subject: RE: "voicing" the electroid (X-posted) From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 09:30:18 -0500   Can't wait for dB's open house to show off the new roll-top desk. Hope it can be combined with the opening of the Surf City Moller.   Peter   Bud wrote:   DesertBob is now the proud owner of the Hammond (grin) ... I think he's gonna make a roll-top desk out of it (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Organistic/Traditional Liturgical Music From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 02 Apr 2001 10:48:16 -0400   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3069053297_8766070_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   From: ScottFop@aol.com Subject: Organistic/Traditional Liturgical Music     [Scott: An excellent essay. A couple of comments.]   I also see beyond it and think that if a steady diet of solid and good traditional hymns are taught (or retaught) and not varied from that a congregation will sing the music of their faith heritage, truly ROMAN CATHOLIC music,   [At this point in my reading, I suspected that you meant CATHOLIC rather than ROMAN CATHOLIC.]   such as Marty Haugen who are NOT even a Catholic.   [And here, that you meant Roman Catholic rather than Catholic; I've been told that he's not Roman, but surely he's SOME kind of a catholic.]   Let's take a look at the psalmody you and I have discussed. =3DA0We use = Anglica=3D n Chant, Gregorian Chant/Plainsong, both accompanied and unaccompanied. = =3DA0And now you have "By Flowing Waters." =3DA0I strongly suggest that you also = invest in both the Anglican Chant Psalter and The Plainsong Psalter. =3DA0(They = are available from The Church Pension Fund in NYC at . . . . Regarding some = of the psalms we sing here, one person said "why are we singing Episcopalian music?" My response was: =3DA0"we are not singing 'Episcopalian' music, we = are singing music published in an Anglican publishing house that is = liturgicall=3D y grounded, beautifully composed and of an excellent calibre for worship." = =3DA0   [And sure enough, it turns out that you DO know the difference. "A Mighty Fortress" is certainly not Lutheran music (or if by some definition you prefer to say that it is, I have to counter that its "Lutheran-ness" is = onl=3D y incidental at best, and that it is far more important that it be seen as CATHOLIC music).]   The Roman Church as well as most other denominations   [Precisely. The Roman Church is one denomination among many that comprise the catholic church.]   Look at David Hurd's "New Plainsong Mass." =3DA0It is an EXCELLENT setting = for any Roman or Anglican congregation. =3DA0   [Or any other, I should think.]   Alan Freed   --MS_Mac_OE_3069053297_8766070_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Organistic/Traditional Liturgical Music</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <B>From: </B>ScottFop@aol.com <BR> <B>Subject: </B>Organistic/Traditional Liturgical Music<BR> <BR> <BR> [Scott: &nbsp;An excellent essay. &nbsp;A couple of comments.]<BR> <BR> I also see beyond it and think that if a steady diet of solid and good = <BR> traditional hymns are taught (or retaught) and not varied from that a <BR> congregation will sing the music of their faith heritage, truly ROMAN <BR> CATHOLIC music,<BR> <BR> [At this point in my reading, I suspected that you meant CATHOLIC rather = <B=3D R> than ROMAN CATHOLIC.]<BR> <BR> such as Marty Haugen who are NOT even a Catholic.<BR> <BR> [And here, that you meant Roman Catholic rather than Catholic; I've been = <B=3D R> told that he's not Roman, but surely he's SOME kind of a catholic.]<BR> <BR> Let's take a look at the psalmody you and I have discussed. =3DA0We use = Anglica=3D n <BR> Chant, Gregorian Chant/Plainsong, both accompanied and unaccompanied. = =3DA0And =3D <BR> now you have &quot;By Flowing Waters.&quot; =3DA0I strongly suggest that = you al=3D so invest <BR> in both the Anglican Chant Psalter and The Plainsong Psalter. =3DA0(They = are <B=3D R> available from The Church Pension Fund in NYC at &nbsp;. . . . Regarding = so=3D me of <BR> the psalms we sing here, one person said &quot;why are we singing = Episcopal=3D ian <BR> music?&quot; My response was: =3DA0&quot;we are not singing 'Episcopalian' = musi=3D c, we are <BR> singing music published in an Anglican publishing house that is = liturgicall=3D y <BR> grounded, beautifully composed and of an excellent calibre for = worship.&quo=3D t; =3DA0<BR> <BR> [And sure enough, it turns out that you DO know the difference. = &nbsp;&quot=3D ;A Mighty <BR> Fortress&quot; is certainly not Lutheran music (or if by some definition = yo=3D u <BR> prefer to say that it is, I have to counter that its = &quot;Lutheran-ness&qu=3D ot; is only <BR> incidental at best, and that it is far more important that it be seen as = <B=3D R> CATHOLIC music).]<BR> <BR> The Roman Church as well as most other denominations<BR> <BR> [Precisely. &nbsp;The Roman Church is one denomination among many that = comp=3D rise <BR> the catholic church.]<BR> <BR> Look at David Hurd's &quot;New Plainsong Mass.&quot; =3DA0It is an = EXCELLENT se=3D tting for <BR> any Roman or Anglican congregation. =3DA0<BR> <BR> [Or any other, I should think.]<BR> <BR> Alan Freed </BODY> </HTML>     --MS_Mac_OE_3069053297_8766070_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: Re: Flenthrop For Sale From: "Patricia A. Blissenbach" <pab@inreach.com> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 07:51:11 -0700   Good grief! I certainly hope not. That Is a real April Fool's message. = I have visited there and was properly impressed by that organ. The = Cathedral left a lasting impression also with those floors. I bought a CD from = their gift shop, also. Patty B-bach   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>     > Almost none of this is true.   > --- Bob North <bnorth@intergate.ca> wrote: > > St. Mark's Cathedral in Seattle announced tonight > > that it has decided to > > sell its Flenthrop organ, damaged recently in the > > 6.8 earthquake that hit > > the Greater Seattle area. Roger Sherman, host of > > the Organ Loft program, > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Favorite Service Repertoire -- Please help From: "David Carter" <david_n_carter@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 02 Apr 2001 15:20:49   On this subject, Alexander Schreiner produced a couple of books of Organ Voluntaries, some written by him, the rest by other composers. I don't recall the exact titles, however.   David Carter     >From: Cremona502@cs.com >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: pipechat@pipechat.org >Subject: Re: Favorite Service Repertoire -- Please help >Date: Sat, 31 Mar 2001 12:53:48 EST > >In a message dated 3/31/01 3:14:18 PM !!!First Boot!!!, = jroussos@san.rr.com >writes: > > > > > > Bach, 8 Little Preludes and Fugues > > > > The Treasury of Early Organ Music, Edited by E Power Biggs, Mercury >Music > > Corp has a lot of good stuff in it. I have used this volume >extensively. > > My favorites would be the Buxtehude, Jig Fugue, and Nun Bitten Wir >chorale > > Daquin, Swiss Noel, with Variations > > Clerambault, Trumpet is Dialogue > > > > The 80 Chorale Preludes, Edited by Keller, Edition Peters, I just wish = I > > knew how to cross reference th German Titles to the tune names is >American > > Hymnals > > > > There is a four volume set, Old English Organ Music for Manuals, = Edited >by > > C. H. Trevor which has lots of fun stuff. > > > > > >This is probably the best and most comprehensive "six" that I've seen. >Toss >in Wedding Music-Part I from Concordia, and "The Organ in Church" by = Frank >Asper, and you pretty much have something for every Sunday. > >I have all of the above books and use them often just for pleasure!! > >Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com >with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" >Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com