PipeChat Digest #1992 - Monday, April 2, 2001
 
Re: "voicing" the electroid (X-posted)
  by "W.D.\"Bill\" Babcock" <wdbabcock@msn.com>
Re: Music of Franz Schmidt
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: HELP!
  by "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@msn.com>
Re: Music of Franz Schmidt
  by "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@msn.com>
Controversial
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Atlantic City High School Organ
  by "Matt Tyndorf" <mtyndorf@home.com>
Anthem - Organ Piece - Which came first?
  by <JKVDP@aol.com>
Re: Music of Franz Schmidt
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Anthem - Organ Piece - Which came first?
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
corrections and addendum
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: "voicing" the electroid (X-posted) From: "W.D.\"Bill\" Babcock" <wdbabcock@msn.com> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 17:23:20 -0500   What! No crackhouse obbligato? The Boyz will be disappointed or just dissed. Bill. ----- Original Message ----- From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net>     At 09:30 AM 4/2/2001 -0500, you wrote: >Can't wait for dB's open house to show off the new roll-top desk. Hope = it >can be combined with the opening of the Surf City Moller.<snip>   BuuD-by-the-Beach has already let out a commission for a dedicatory work for the upcoming St. Matt's-by-the-Condo-Farm's initial recital on the = Surf City M=F6ller. It will be a Sonata for Organ, Aquarium and Plant Stands, = in three movements, featuring the aquarium pump prominently in solo parts. I shall provide said aquarium and plant stands. Composer and aquarium pump performer TBA.   dB     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Music of Franz Schmidt From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Mon, 02 Apr 2001 17:33:12 -0500   At 09:09 PM 4/2/01 +1000, Mark wrote: >There has been quite a lot of discussion on this list about the organ = music >of Franz Schmidt. I had heard of this composer but never to my knowledge >ever heard any of his music.   Hi Mark, and List!   I too would be curious to learn more about Franz Schmidt. In the last = year or so I have heard two of his organ works, and I truly enjoyed both = (though I would be hard pressed to remember exactly *which* two works I heard...<g>). I'd certainly be game to hear more!   Arthur -- how 'bouts it...? Could you give us a "Franz Schmidt = 101"...??? And for that matter, is your CD recording available "to the public" somewhere? I really would like to hear more...!   Cheers --   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR  
(back) Subject: Re: HELP! From: "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@msn.com> Date: Mon, 02 Apr 2001 18:07:44 -0500   >So my pastor (who know nothing about organs) told me he wanted an > >abundance of trumpets, and chimes used! >TRUMPETS! CHIMES! >I WISH!     Well, it's easy. HIRE people who play trumpets and chimes!   Is the pastor going to recommend registrations when you get the Allen?   Ray _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Music of Franz Schmidt From: "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@msn.com> Date: Mon, 02 Apr 2001 18:14:55 -0500   >Arthur -- how 'bouts it...? Could you give us a "Franz Schmidt = 101"...???   May I respectfully suggest that folks research the archives of pipeorg-l? = Herr Schmidt was given a thorough autopsy about a year ago before his = patron was bounced from the list.   Ray _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Controversial From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 19:32:47 EDT     --part1_7f.126e9687.27fa661f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   A Lister writes: "Franz Schmidt was quite controversial....."   While he was alive, Franz Schmidt was one of the least controversial composers around. Far less controversial than, say, Arnold Schoenberg, = Igor Stravinsky, Bela Bartok, etc.   I think the allusion is actually to politics, not to music. And this controversy came about after Schmidt was already dead.   Franz Schmidt lived in Austria. Until March, 1938, Austria was an independent country, with its own government, its own culture, and its own =   laws. It was in an independent Austria in which Franz Schmidt lived, worked, taught, performed, and composed.   Franz Schmidt was known to be uninterested in politics --- some would say: =   unduly naive in such matters. However, it is a fact that he had many = Jewish friends, and often performed with them in public. In fact, it was Schmidt =   who conducted the Vienna premiere of Schoenberg's "Pierrot Lunaire". Therefore, any suggestion that Schmidt ever harbored any sympathies for = the anti-Semitic Nazi ideology has no credibility.   In March 1938, Austria was invaded and forcibly annexed by Nazi Germany. = At that time, Franz Schmidt had less than a year to live, probably was aware that his life expectancy was severely limited, and thus had other matters = on his mind than politics. (The most important thing on his mind was the = June 1938 premiere of his masterpiece, "Das Buch mit sieben Siegeln", composed mainly in 1937, and completed early in 1938. BEFORE the Anschluss.)   Having successfully annexed Austria (with scarcely a murmur from the = Allied powers), the Nazi regime wanted a major musical composition to celebrate their feat. This had to be composed by a major Austrian composer. But: most of the Austrian composers were persona non grata, insofar as the Nazis were concerned --- either because they were Jewish (Schoenberg) or because = their music was considered too avant-garde (Alban Berg; Anton von Webern. Ironic in the latter case, = as Webern clearly sympathized with the "New Order"). That left Franz Schmidt as the =   most prominent Austrian composer on the scene who would be "acceptable", = and the Nazis demanded that he compose a cantata to celebrate their new rule = over his country. When the Nazis demanded something of you, you just didn't refuse --- there could be repercussions not only to you, but also to your family and associates.   Schmidt undertook to compose something to order; but he never actually got =   beyond some preliminary sketches. (The main surviving part of the = manuscript which is actually Schmidt's own handiwork is a piece for organ and 16 = brass instruments, called "Fuga Solemnis".) By late 1938, he had put the work aside. He was a very sick man, in any event; and in February 1939, he = died. He was given a great funeral at which, it was said, all of Vienna turned = out. So much for his being "controversial".   Now, the Nazi regime would not be thwarted. They were determined to have their cantata, live Schmidt or dead Schmidt. So they assigned the = completion of the work to a pupil of Schmidt named Robert Wagner (no relation to the American actor of a later era!). Wagner finished the cantata, and it was performed just one time, in June, 1940. Unfortunately for Franz Schmidt's =   reputation --- mind you, he was no longer alive --- the work was presented = as a cantata composed by Franz Schmidt, as if he had composed the entire work =   himself (which he had not). Poor Robert Wagner received short shrift.   It is on the basis of this one incident --- a posthumous incident, mainly = --- that the "controversy" later arose --- mainly in the post-World War II = period of "de-Nazification". It is true that Schmidt's music was promoted during =   World War II by the Nazi regime ---- there were few other contemporary composers around whom they cared to promote (except Carl Orff of "Carmina Burana" fame, or notoriety, depending on your viewpoint). This, however, was of no concern to Franz Schmidt: he was already dead. The Nazis also = promoted Wagner and Bruckner: should we condemn Wagner and Bruckner as a = consequence?   I doubt very much if Hitler, personally, knew anything about Franz = Schmidt. I doubt if ever learned anything new after the age of 16! And, although a =   native of Austria, he had left that country long before World War I --- to =   return only once in his life, at the time of the Anshluss in March 1938. = He was, however, befriended by the Wagner family in the 1920s (including Wagner's son and English-born daughter-in-law), and the annual Bayreuth Festival became a vehicle for the glorification of Nazism during the = 1930s. I don't think we can blame Wagner --- already dead half a century --- for that.   Schmidt was not the only composer to be unjustly accused of Nazi = sympathies after the War: the same charge was leveled in Hungary against leading composer Ernst von Dohnanyi. This, despite the fact that Dohnanyi had refused to obey the anti-Jewish laws in Hungary during the War. = Eventually, Dohnanyi was cleared by a Court; nevertheless, he eventually went into = exile (mainly to escape the Communist takeover). Franz Schmidt, however, was = not alive to defend himself against any accusations that might arise or that might be rumored about.   During the post-World War II period, it was actually Jewish musicians who = did much to re-establish Schmidt's reputation. The Jewish conductor Josef = Krips conducted the U.S. premiere of "Das Buch mit sieben Siegeln" in Cincinatti = in 1954, for instance. In 1954, the oratorio was chosen by the Vatican = itself to be performed at the International Eucharistic Congress held that year = in Switzerland. I really doubt that the Vatican would have chosen a "Nazi" composer to celebrate this most sacred of conclaves.   All of this has been pointed out before, in great detail, both by myself = and by many other authors much more distinguished than I. For instance, = Lincoln Center composer-in-residence Richard Wilson, in his pre-concert lecture at =   Lincoln Center in November 1996, preceding the New York premiere of "Das = Buch mit sieben Siegeln". And just last month at Severance Hall in Cleveland, Ohio, by Peter Laki, preceding the splendid performance there led by Franz Welser-Mo"st. I = find it disappointing that anyone finds any need to bring up old and = discredited canards ("Hitler's composer"). Prior to March 1938, Franz Schmidt barely knew that Hitler existed; and as for Hitler, he probably never heard of Schmidt. (Hitler not being an educated man!)   Whatever one might think of Schmidt's music, let's judge it on its own intrinsic merits. And those, I submit, are enormous. It should be of particular interest to organists, inasmuch as he composed a considerable = body of organ music --- including several works of vast symphonic dimensions (Chaconne, Prelude and Fugue in E-Flat, Prelude and Fugue in C, etc.). = The technical demands of these works are invariably formidable --- which discourages many from = undertaking their study. For those willing to make the effort, the rewards are more = than worth it.   It's interesting that, on the occasion of a double anniversary --- the = 125th of his birth and the 60th of his death --- Franz Schmidt was chosen to be = the theme of the annual organ concert series at l'Oratoire St. Joseph in Montreal. The performances on that occasion --- nine different organists, =   performing the entire corpus of Schmidt's organ music --- ranged the = gamut, from outstanding to less than outstanding. But the series most certainly = did get attention from the press! Much of it highly favorable. (I might add, =   parenthetically, that it allowed me to get my own picture in the = newspapers there, on at least two occasions. I was one of the nine organists invited = to participate, for which I remain most grateful to the organizers, Raymond Daveluy and Rachel Laurin --- who, themselves, gave two of the finest performances of that series.)   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_7f.126e9687.27fa661f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>A Lister writes: = &nbsp;"Franz Schmidt was quite controversial....." <BR> <BR>While he was alive, Franz Schmidt was one of the least controversial <BR>composers around. &nbsp;Far less controversial than, say, Arnold = Schoenberg, Igor <BR>Stravinsky, Bela Bartok, etc. <BR> <BR>I think the allusion is actually to politics, not to music. &nbsp;And = this <BR>controversy came about after Schmidt was already dead. <BR> <BR>Franz Schmidt lived in Austria. &nbsp;Until March, 1938, Austria was = an <BR>independent country, with its own government, its own culture, and its = own <BR>laws. &nbsp;&nbsp;It was in an independent Austria in which Franz = Schmidt lived, <BR>worked, taught, performed, and composed. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>Franz Schmidt was known to be uninterested in politics --- some would = say: <BR>unduly naive in such matters. &nbsp;However, it is a fact that he had = many Jewish <BR>friends, and often performed with them in public. &nbsp;In fact, it = was Schmidt <BR>who conducted the Vienna premiere of Schoenberg's "Pierrot Lunaire". = &nbsp; <BR>Therefore, any suggestion that Schmidt ever harbored any sympathies = for the <BR>anti-Semitic Nazi ideology has no credibility. <BR> <BR>In March 1938, Austria was invaded and forcibly annexed by Nazi = Germany. &nbsp;At <BR>that time, Franz Schmidt had less than a year to live, probably was = aware <BR>that his life expectancy was severely limited, and thus had other = matters on <BR>his mind than politics. &nbsp;(The most important thing on his mind = was the June <BR>1938 premiere of his masterpiece, "Das Buch mit sieben Siegeln", = composed <BR>mainly in 1937, and completed early in 1938. BEFORE the Anschluss.) <BR> <BR>Having successfully annexed Austria (with scarcely a murmur from the = Allied <BR>powers), the Nazi regime wanted a major musical composition to = celebrate <BR>their feat. <BR>This had to be composed by a major Austrian composer. &nbsp;But: most = of the <BR>Austrian composers were persona non grata, insofar as the Nazis were <BR>concerned --- either because they were Jewish (Schoenberg) or because = their <BR>music was considered <BR>too avant-garde (Alban Berg; Anton von Webern. &nbsp;Ironic in the = latter case, as <BR>Webern <BR>clearly sympathized with the "New Order"). &nbsp;That left Franz = Schmidt as the <BR>most prominent Austrian composer on the scene who would be = "acceptable", and <BR>the Nazis demanded that he compose a cantata to celebrate their new = rule over <BR>his country. &nbsp;When the Nazis demanded something of you, you just = didn't <BR>refuse --- there could be repercussions not only to you, but also to = your <BR>family and associates. <BR> <BR>Schmidt undertook to compose something to order; but he never actually = got <BR>beyond some preliminary sketches. &nbsp;(The main surviving part of = the manuscript <BR>which is actually Schmidt's own handiwork is a piece for organ and 16 = brass <BR>instruments, called "Fuga Solemnis".) &nbsp;By late 1938, he had put = the work <BR>aside. &nbsp;He was a very sick man, in any event; and in February = 1939, he died. &nbsp; <BR>He was given a great funeral at which, it was said, all of Vienna = turned out. <BR>&nbsp;So much for his being "controversial". <BR> <BR>Now, the Nazi regime would not be thwarted. &nbsp;They were determined = to have <BR>their cantata, live Schmidt or dead Schmidt. &nbsp;So they assigned = the completion <BR>of the work to a pupil of Schmidt named Robert Wagner (no relation to = the <BR>American actor of a later era!). &nbsp;Wagner finished the cantata, = and it was <BR>performed just one time, in June, 1940. &nbsp;Unfortunately for Franz = Schmidt's <BR>reputation --- mind you, he was no longer alive --- the work was = presented as <BR>a cantata composed by Franz Schmidt, as if he had composed the entire work <BR>himself (which he had not). &nbsp;Poor Robert Wagner received short = shrift. <BR> <BR>It is on the basis of this one incident --- a posthumous incident, = mainly --- <BR>that the "controversy" later arose --- mainly in the post-World War II = period <BR>of "de-Nazification". &nbsp;It is true that Schmidt's music was = promoted during <BR>World War II by the Nazi regime ---- there were few other contemporary =   <BR>composers around whom they cared to promote (except Carl Orff of = "Carmina <BR>Burana" fame, or notoriety, depending on your viewpoint). &nbsp;This, = however, was <BR>of no concern to Franz Schmidt: he was already dead. &nbsp;The Nazis = also promoted <BR>Wagner and Bruckner: should we condemn Wagner and Bruckner as a = consequence? <BR> <BR>I doubt very much if Hitler, personally, knew anything about Franz = Schmidt. &nbsp; <BR>I doubt if ever learned anything new after the age of 16! &nbsp;And, = although a <BR>native of Austria, he had left that country long before World War I = --- to <BR>return only once in his life, at the time of the Anshluss in March = 1938. &nbsp;He <BR>was, however, befriended by the Wagner family in the 1920s (including <BR>Wagner's son and English-born daughter-in-law), and the annual = Bayreuth <BR>Festival became a vehicle for the glorification of Nazism during the = 1930s. &nbsp; <BR>I don't think we can blame Wagner --- already dead half a century --- = for <BR>that. <BR> <BR>Schmidt was not the only composer to be unjustly accused of Nazi = sympathies <BR>after the War: the same charge was leveled in Hungary against leading <BR>composer Ernst von Dohnanyi. &nbsp;This, despite the fact that = Dohnanyi had <BR>refused to obey the anti-Jewish laws in Hungary during the War. = &nbsp;Eventually, <BR>Dohnanyi was cleared by a Court; nevertheless, he eventually went into = exile <BR>(mainly to escape the Communist takeover). &nbsp;Franz Schmidt, = however, was not <BR>alive to defend himself against any accusations that might arise or = that <BR>might be rumored about. <BR> <BR>During the post-World War II period, it was actually Jewish musicians = who did <BR>much to re-establish Schmidt's reputation. &nbsp;The Jewish conductor = Josef Krips <BR>conducted the U.S. premiere of "Das Buch mit sieben Siegeln" in = Cincinatti in <BR>1954, for instance. &nbsp;In 1954, the oratorio was chosen by the = Vatican itself <BR>to be performed at the International Eucharistic Congress held that = year in <BR>Switzerland. &nbsp;I really doubt that the Vatican would have chosen a = "Nazi" <BR>composer to celebrate this most sacred of conclaves. <BR> <BR>All of this has been pointed out before, in great detail, both by = myself and <BR>by many other authors much more distinguished &nbsp;than I. &nbsp;For = instance, Lincoln <BR>Center composer-in-residence Richard Wilson, in his pre-concert = lecture at <BR>Lincoln Center in November 1996, preceding the New York premiere of = "Das Buch <BR>mit sieben Siegeln". <BR>And just last month at Severance Hall in Cleveland, Ohio, by Peter = Laki, <BR>preceding the splendid performance there led by Franz Welser-Mo"st. = &nbsp;I find <BR>it disappointing that anyone finds any need to bring up old and = discredited <BR>canards ("Hitler's composer"). &nbsp;Prior to March 1938, Franz = Schmidt barely <BR>knew that Hitler existed; and as for Hitler, he probably never heard = of <BR>Schmidt. &nbsp;(Hitler not being an educated man!) <BR> <BR>Whatever one might think of Schmidt's music, let's judge it on its own =   <BR>intrinsic merits. &nbsp;And those, I submit, are enormous. &nbsp;It = should be of <BR>particular interest to organists, inasmuch as he composed a = considerable body <BR>of organ music --- including several works of vast symphonic = dimensions <BR>(Chaconne, Prelude and Fugue in E-Flat, Prelude and Fugue in C, etc.). = &nbsp;The <BR>technical demands of these <BR>works are invariably formidable --- which discourages many from = undertaking <BR>their study. &nbsp;For those willing to make the effort, the rewards are more than <BR>worth it. <BR> <BR>It's interesting that, on the occasion of a double anniversary --- the = 125th <BR>of his birth and the 60th of his death --- Franz Schmidt was chosen to = be the <BR>theme of the annual organ concert series at l'Oratoire St. Joseph in <BR>Montreal. &nbsp;The performances on that occasion --- nine different = organists, <BR>performing the entire corpus of Schmidt's organ music --- ranged the = gamut, <BR>from outstanding to less than outstanding. &nbsp;But the series most = certainly did <BR>get attention from the press! &nbsp;Much of it highly favorable. = &nbsp;(I might add, <BR>parenthetically, that it allowed me to get my own picture in the = newspapers <BR>there, on at least two occasions. &nbsp;I was one of the nine = organists invited to <BR>participate, for which I remain most grateful to the organizers, = Raymond <BR>Daveluy and Rachel Laurin --- who, themselves, gave two of the finest <BR>performances of that series.) <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_7f.126e9687.27fa661f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Atlantic City High School Organ From: "Matt Tyndorf" <mtyndorf@home.com> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 20:01:17 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0014_01C0BBAF.ADAF6D80 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     Hey All   I've been looking around the net for any info on the current status (or final fate) of the Atlantic City High School's Midmer-Losh organ.. all = I've found is a picture of the (seemingly gutted) console... anyone have any info?   Thanks!   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0014_01C0BBAF.ADAF6D80 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Dus-ascii"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4611.1300" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#0000ff size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520080000-03042001><FONT face=3D3DTahoma = size=3D3D2>Hey =3D   All</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520080000-03042001><FONT face=3D3DTahoma=3D20 size=3D3D2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520080000-03042001><FONT face=3D3DTahoma =3D size=3D3D2>I've been looking=3D20 around the net for any info on the current status (or final fate) of =3D the=3D20 Atlantic City High School's Midmer-Losh organ.. all I've found is a =3D picture of=3D20 the (seemingly gutted) console... anyone have any =3D info?</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520080000-03042001><FONT face=3D3DTahoma=3D20 size=3D3D2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520080000-03042001><FONT face=3D3DTahoma=3D20 size=3D3D2>Thanks!</FONT></SPAN></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0014_01C0BBAF.ADAF6D80--    
(back) Subject: Anthem - Organ Piece - Which came first? From: <JKVDP@aol.com> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 20:35:21 EDT   Yesterday morning I felt it was appropriate for some rather solemn music, even for Presbyterians. Walford Davies "Solemn Melody" filled the bill. = But then I remembered that Walford Davies used the same theme in an = anthem. A search of the composers index of the old "Church Anthem Book" showed = that he had set the marvelous Richard Baxter text "Lord, It Belongs Not To My Care" to the same tune. The question, which came first - the organ piece = or the choral piece? Jerry, the Seattle Calvinist  
(back) Subject: Re: Music of Franz Schmidt From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 20:52:31 EDT     --part1_9f.136bc57e.27fa78cf_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 4/2/01 3:32:57 PM Pacific Daylight Time, tmbovard@arkansas.net writes:     > Arthur -- how 'bouts it...? Could you give us a "Franz Schmidt = 101"...??? > And for that matter, is your CD recording available "to the public" > somewhere? I really would like to hear more...! > >   I'll join the class, too. In addition, what is a good introductory piece = of Schmidt's music.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_9f.136bc57e.27fa78cf_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 4/2/01 3:32:57 PM Pacific Daylight Time, <BR>tmbovard@arkansas.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Arthur -- = &nbsp;how 'bouts it...? &nbsp;Could you give us a "Franz Schmidt = 101"...??? <BR>And for that matter, is your CD recording available "to the public" <BR>somewhere? &nbsp;I really would like to hear more...! <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I'll join the class, too. &nbsp;&nbsp;In addition, what is a good = introductory piece of <BR>Schmidt's music. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_9f.136bc57e.27fa78cf_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Anthem - Organ Piece - Which came first? From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 19:56:43 -0400   >Yesterday morning I felt it was appropriate for some rather solemn music, >even for Presbyterians. Walford Davies "Solemn Melody" filled the bill. >But then I remembered that Walford Davies used the same theme in an = anthem. >A search of the composers index of the old "Church Anthem Book" showed = that >he had set the marvelous Richard Baxter text "Lord, It Belongs Not To My >Care" to the same tune. The question, which came first - the organ piece = or >the choral piece? >Jerry, the Seattle Calvinist   This is so weird. This morning I was perusing the 1979 reprint of the 1933 edition of the "Church Anthem Book" and came across this very anthem for the first time, which as I began to play it on the piano I suddenly realized was the "Solemn Melody." A really spooky coincidence (not that it's the same tune, but that the anthem should have been on your mind as well). I hope Mr. Davies is enjoying all this attention as he looks down on us from the great beyond.   Certainly the same question occurred to me this morning, and hope someone can give us an answer. There is, I think, some additional melodic material in the anthem that is not in the organ piece.   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu  
(back) Subject: corrections and addendum From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2001 21:03:33 EDT     --part1_33.12efe470.27fa7b65_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Corrections to my previous posting: The International Eucharistic Congress in Switzerland was held in 1960, = not 1954.   Alban Berg died in 1935, and thus would not have been available to compose = a cantata for the Nazis in 1938/39, even in the unlikely event that he were = so commissioned.   Many of the other leading German and Austrian composers went into exile, including Hindemith, Krenek, Korngold, Klemperer, and numerous others. = Not all were able to do so, however, and thus had to live out the War years = under a regime which they actually detested. I think that could be said of the highly cultivated Carl Orff --- two of whose lesser-known works are soon = to be performed at Lincoln Center, New York.   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_33.12efe470.27fa7b65_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Corrections to my = previous posting: <BR>The International Eucharistic Congress in Switzerland was held in = 1960, not <BR>1954. <BR> <BR>Alban Berg died in 1935, and thus would not have been available to = compose a <BR>cantata for the Nazis in 1938/39, even in the unlikely event that he = were so <BR>commissioned. <BR> <BR>Many of the other leading German and Austrian composers went into = exile, <BR>including Hindemith, Krenek, Korngold, Klemperer, and numerous others. = &nbsp;Not <BR>all were able to do so, however, and thus had to live out the War = years under <BR>a regime which they actually detested. &nbsp;I think that could be = said of the <BR>highly cultivated Carl Orff --- two of whose lesser-known works are = soon to <BR>be performed at Lincoln Center, New York. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_33.12efe470.27fa7b65_boundary--