PipeChat Digest #1998 - Thursday, April 5, 2001
 
Re: Ernst-Bach transcription
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Schmidt Toccata, etc.
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Post-Concert Remarks
  by "r" <basset3@warwick.net>
Re: Post-Concert Remarks
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: Post-Concert Remarks
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
Re: Post-Concert Remarks
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Schmidt Discussion
  by <StatRussell@aol.com>
Divine Paternity
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Mark Hayes Recital
  by "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com>
Re: Mark Hayes Recital
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
I Have Sinned!! (Waaaaay off topic)
  by "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com>
Re: Divine Paternity
  by "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@bayou.com>
Atlanta Recitals
  by "hell-concerts" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Re: Divine Paternity
  by "Kenneth LaFleur" <lafleur@pivot.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Ernst-Bach transcription From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 02:42:23 -0700 (PDT)   I seriously doubt that a copyrighted edition of anything is downloadable. Why don't you simply just order the music?   --- Cremona502@cs.com wrote: > In a message dated 4/4/01 3:15:10 PM Pacific > Daylight Time, > jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com writes: > > > > The Ernst-Bach transcription is included in the > Peters > > complete Bach edition, Vol. VIII, if I recall. > > > > > > Any chance this is available in a free download > somewhere??? > > (hope hope hope) > > Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ > ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Visit Howling Acres at > http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Schmidt Toccata, etc. From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 08:02:55 EDT     --part1_bc.12ad1224.27fdb8ef_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In response to a query on the Franz Schmidt Toccata in C: The publisher is Universal Edition, Vienna. Copies can be ordered from = them. In my opinion, this is not one of Schmidt's more important organ compositions; but it's easier to play than the others --- and it can, = indeed, be taken at a fast tempo, for those who like to make an impression with flashy numbers.   Universal Edition also published Schmidt's Fantasia and Fugue in D Minor; = and the Toccata and Fugue in [theoretically!] A-Flat.   The other works are published either by Leuckart or Weinberger, except for =   the Prelude and Fugue in A (Weihnachtspastorale) and Der Heiland ist erstanden, which are published by a Swedish publishing house: Nordiska Musikforlaget.   To Desert Bob: I see no similarity at all between Franz Schmidt and Karg-Elert. Most of K-E is minor fluff, compared to Schmidt --- who is = more on a plane with Bruckner and Mahler. Also, K-E composed mainly for organ = and piano, while Schmidt was a major orchestral composer.   In addition to Wayne Marshall, another English organist who has played Schmidt --- and more of him than Marshall --- is Anne Page. The late Lady =   Susi Jeans (a native of Austria) also often played Schmidt --- as well as Schmidt's pupil and editor, Walter Pach.   Franz Schmidt lived under the infamous Third Reich for less than one year (the last year of his life). Others were not so fortunate, and had to = live under it until it came crashing down in 1945. Composers such as Richard Strauss, Hans Pfitzner, Carl Orff, Karl Ho"ller, Georg Trexler, Joseph = Haas, etc. Except for Ho"ller and Trexler, those composers wrote little or nothing for the organ, so organists tend not to think about them, which is = a pity. Some musicians did join the Nazi party in the 1930s (before the = War began): it was considered the way to get ahead --- much as any composer in =   the Soviet Union would have joined the Communist party, solely to get = ahead. This did not mean, ipso facto, that these people were evil. Some went on = to have prominent post-war careers: conductor Herbert von Karajan, for = instance. Just because one joined the Nazi party in those days did not necessarily mean that one actually believed in its evil ideology. Many people were politically naive, and expected positive accomplishments from the new = regime --- including composers Richard Strauss and Hans Pfitzner. No one knew, = in 1938/39 that Hitler would plunge the world into a world war, and no one = then could have imagined the campaign of genocide which was to be the corollary = of that war.   Arthur LaMirande       --part1_bc.12ad1224.27fdb8ef_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In response to a query = on the Franz Schmidt Toccata in C: <BR>The publisher is Universal Edition, Vienna. &nbsp;Copies can be = ordered from them. <BR>In my opinion, this is not one of Schmidt's more important organ <BR>compositions; but it's easier to play than the others --- and it can, = indeed, <BR>be taken at a fast tempo, for those who like to make an impression = with <BR>flashy numbers. <BR> <BR>Universal Edition also published Schmidt's Fantasia and Fugue in D = Minor; and <BR>the Toccata and Fugue in [theoretically!] A-Flat. <BR> <BR>The other works are published either by Leuckart or Weinberger, except = for <BR>the Prelude and Fugue in A (Weihnachtspastorale) and Der Heiland ist <BR>erstanden, which are published by a Swedish publishing house: Nordiska =   <BR>Musikforlaget. <BR> <BR>To Desert Bob: I see no similarity at all between Franz Schmidt and <BR>Karg-Elert. &nbsp;Most of K-E is minor fluff, compared to Schmidt --- = who is more <BR>on a plane with Bruckner and Mahler. &nbsp;Also, K-E composed mainly = for organ and <BR>piano, while Schmidt was a major orchestral composer. <BR> <BR>In addition to Wayne Marshall, another English organist who has played <BR>Schmidt --- and more of him than Marshall --- is Anne Page. &nbsp;The = late Lady <BR>Susi Jeans (a native of Austria) also often played Schmidt --- as well = as <BR>Schmidt's pupil and editor, Walter Pach. <BR> <BR>Franz Schmidt lived under the infamous Third Reich for less than one = year <BR>(the last year of his life). &nbsp;Others were not so fortunate, and = had to live <BR>under it until it came crashing down in 1945. &nbsp;Composers such as = Richard <BR>Strauss, Hans Pfitzner, Carl Orff, Karl Ho"ller, Georg Trexler, Joseph = Haas, <BR>etc. &nbsp;&nbsp;Except for Ho"ller and Trexler, those composers wrote = little or <BR>nothing for the organ, so organists tend not to think about them, = which is a <BR>pity. &nbsp;&nbsp;Some musicians did join the Nazi party in the 1930s = (before the War <BR>began): it was considered the way to get ahead --- much as any = composer in <BR>the Soviet Union would have joined the Communist party, solely to get = ahead. &nbsp; <BR>This did not mean, ipso facto, that these people were evil. &nbsp;Some = went on to <BR>have prominent post-war careers: conductor Herbert von Karajan, for = instance. <BR>&nbsp;Just because one joined the Nazi party in those days did not = necessarily <BR>mean that one actually believed in its evil ideology. &nbsp;Many = people were <BR>politically naive, and expected positive accomplishments from the new = regime <BR>--- including composers Richard Strauss and Hans Pfitzner. &nbsp;No = one knew, in <BR>1938/39 that Hitler would plunge the world into a world war, and no = one then <BR>could have imagined the campaign of genocide which was to be the = corollary of <BR>that war. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_bc.12ad1224.27fdb8ef_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Post-Concert Remarks From: "r" <basset3@warwick.net> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 08:28:12 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_007D_01C0BDAA.5A30A000 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   "My oh my, I've been going to this church for 100 years and never heard = =3D that organ sound so good. I wonder why it doesn't sound like that on =3D Sundays," says the little ole blue-haired lady to me (within earshot of = =3D the resident organist) just as she removed a white glove from her hand =3D to reach for a lemon square on the buffet table.   Having heard this remark, what does one say in response?   In reflection, what passed through my mind was:   We all play on Sundays and are, for the most part, church organists not = =3D concert organists. Our forte for hymns and general service playing is =3D different from the concert literature. Peter Conte, who played two =3D years ago at Grace Episcopal, elicited the same response from =3D congregants afterward. "Why in all the years since that organ was =3D installed, I never heard it played like that." Ouch, if one is the =3D resident organist, that must hurt.   Your thoughts please.   Robert Clooney (Middletown, NY; St. Paul's UMC)   ------=3D_NextPart_000_007D_01C0BDAA.5A30A000 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>"My oh my, I've been going to this church for 100 = =3D years and=3D20 never heard that organ sound so good.&nbsp; I wonder why it doesn't =3D sound like=3D20 that on Sundays," says the little ole blue-haired lady to me (within =3D earshot of=3D20 the resident organist) just as she removed a white glove from her hand =3D to reach=3D20 for a lemon square on the&nbsp;buffet table.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Having heard this remark, what does one say in=3D20 response?</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>In reflection, what passed through my mind =3D was:</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>We all play on Sundays and are, for the most=3D20 part,&nbsp;</FONT><FONT size=3D3D2>church organists not concert =3D organists.&nbsp;=3D20 </FONT><FONT size=3D3D2>Our forte for hymns and general service playing is = =3D different=3D20 from the&nbsp;concert literature.&nbsp; Peter Conte, who played two =3D years=3D20 ago&nbsp;at Grace Episcopal, elicited the same response from congregants = =3D   afterward.&nbsp; </FONT><FONT size=3D3D2>"Why in all the&nbsp;years since = =3D that organ=3D20 was installed, I never heard&nbsp;it played like that."&nbsp; Ouch, if =3D one is=3D20 the resident organist, that must hurt.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Your thoughts please.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Robert Clooney (Middletown, NY; St. Paul's=3D20 UMC)</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_007D_01C0BDAA.5A30A000--    
(back) Subject: Re: Post-Concert Remarks From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2001 09:34:05 -0400   Well, you can take some solace from Vatican II which pronounced that mediocrity was no longer a Mortal Sin.   ...However, how many 'World Class' musicians does any instrument have?   no matter how loud or expensive the guitar amps may be?   They are not Segovia.   And at least that blue-haired lady appreciated the difference in her organ music.         > r wrote: > > "My oh my, I've been going to this church for 100 years and never heard = that > organ sound so good. I wonder why it doesn't sound like that on = Sundays," > says the little ole blue-haired lady to me (within earshot of the = resident > organist) just as she removed a white glove from her hand to reach for a > lemon square on the buffet table. > > Having heard this remark, what does one say in response? > > In reflection, what passed through my mind was: > > We all play on Sundays and are, for the most part, church organists not > concert organists. Our forte for hymns and general service playing is > different from the concert literature. Peter Conte, who played two = years > ago at Grace Episcopal, elicited the same response from congregants > afterward. "Why in all the years since that organ was installed, I = never > heard it played like that." Ouch, if one is the resident organist, that > must hurt. > > Your thoughts please. > > Robert Clooney (Middletown, NY; St. Paul's UMC)  
(back) Subject: Re: Post-Concert Remarks From: <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 21:38:43 +0800 (CST)       On Thu, 5 Apr 2001, r wrote:   > > "My oh my, I've been going to this church for 100 years and never heard = =3D > that organ sound so good. I wonder why it doesn't sound like that on = =3D > Sundays," says the little ole blue-haired lady to me (within earshot of = =3D > the resident organist) just as she removed a white glove from her hand = =3D > to reach for a lemon square on the buffet table. > > Having heard this remark, what does one say in response? >   Yes, this was said once when I was serving as an interim at my home church... it came back to me second hand.... but I really didn't take it too seriously.... The piece referred to played as a Prelude by the other individual was Franck's CHoral in A minor... which I, by the way, didn't think was so suitable as a Prelude for our church congregation , which was used to rather quieter pieces to meditate by before the service started... =     Later on that particular organist got his DMA or other doctorate... I think from Eastman...   On the other hand, some people thought I did even better than our first organist of sixteen years (who was my first teacher) ...   To some people, maybe the organ concert repertoire is more appealing and does sound better... everyone has their own tast in music...   But, if another organist comes along and plays a service and someone makes that type of a comment, I could see why the resident organist might be hurt, even if he/she knows he is technically not that good as the organist who subbed for him/her....   Sometimes I guess we have to (1) consider the source and (2) just take criticisms with a grain of salt and separate the wheat from the chaff...       Best wishes to all...       Morton Belcher fellow pipechat list member...       > In reflection, what passed through my mind was: > > We all play on Sundays and are, for the most part, church organists not = =3D > concert organists. Our forte for hymns and general service playing is = =3D > different from the concert literature. Peter Conte, who played two =3D > years ago at Grace Episcopal, elicited the same response from =3D > congregants afterward. "Why in all the years since that organ was =3D > installed, I never heard it played like that." Ouch, if one is the =3D > resident organist, that must hurt. > > Your thoughts please. > > Robert Clooney (Middletown, NY; St. Paul's UMC) >     > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Post-Concert Remarks From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2001 06:42:27 -0700     --------------3FA915D8D50A489515E58551 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Peter Conte is a virtuoso. I wouldn't feel threatened to have him play a recital at my church, or anyone else, for that matter. I'm not a recitalist ... never have been, never will be. I HATE playing recitals, so I DON'T (grin).   I've had the same thing said when I've substituted in colleagues' churches. I think it NEVER hurts to have someone come to an organ with no preconceived notions ... and see what THEY can get out of it.   My LCMS colleague nearly had a HEART ATTACK when he heard me play Vierne's Clair de Lune on his 27-rank all-unenclosed Schlicker (grin), but it WORKED.   Those of us who play in liturgical churches produce a HUGE body of music year by year ... in my particular case, 90% of it is choral and congregational; maybe 10% is organ music. That will probably go up somewhat when we get the pipe organ, but the function of the organ in our service (at least) is different from the function of an organ in recital. Some churches WANT an organ recital before and after service; mine doesn't.   I think the lady meant no harm ... she was just making conversation (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   r wrote:   > "My oh my, I've been going to this church for 100 years and never > heard that organ sound so good. I wonder why it doesn't sound like > that on Sundays," says the little ole blue-haired lady to me (within > earshot of the resident organist) just as she removed a white glove > from her hand to reach for a lemon square on the buffet table. Having > heard this remark, what does one say in response? In reflection, what > passed through my mind was: We all play on Sundays and are, for the > most part, church organists not concert organists. Our forte for > hymns and general service playing is different from the concert > literature. Peter Conte, who played two years ago at Grace Episcopal, > elicited the same response from congregants afterward. "Why in all > the years since that organ was installed, I never heard it played like > that." Ouch, if one is the resident organist, that must hurt. Your > thoughts please. Robert Clooney (Middletown, NY; St. Paul's UMC)   --------------3FA915D8D50A489515E58551 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> <body bgcolor=3D"#FFFFFF"> Peter Conte is a virtuoso. I wouldn't feel threatened to have him play a recital at my church, or anyone else, for that matter. I'm not a = recitalist .... never have been, never will be. I HATE playing recitals, so I DON'T (grin). <p>I've had the same thing said when I've substituted in colleagues' = churches. I think it NEVER hurts to have someone come to an organ with no = preconceived notions ... and see what THEY can get out of it. <p>My LCMS colleague nearly had a HEART ATTACK when he heard me play = Vierne's Clair de Lune on his 27-rank all-unenclosed Schlicker (grin), but it = WORKED. <p>Those of us who play in liturgical churches produce a HUGE body of = music year by year ... in my particular case, 90% of it is choral and = congregational; maybe 10% is organ music. That will probably go up somewhat when we get the pipe organ, but the function of the organ in&nbsp; our service (at least) is different from the function of an organ in recital. Some = churches WANT an organ recital before and after service; mine doesn't. <p>I think the lady meant no harm ... she was just making conversation (grin). <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <p>r wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><style></style> <font size=3D-1>"My oh my, I've been going to this church for 100 years and never heard that organ sound so good.&nbsp; I wonder why it doesn't sound like that on Sundays," says the little ole blue-haired lady to me (within earshot of the resident = organist) just as she removed a white glove from her hand to reach for a lemon = square on the buffet table.</font>&nbsp;<font size=3D-1>Having heard this remark, what does one say in response?</font>&nbsp;<font size=3D-1>In reflection, what passed through my mind was:</font>&nbsp;<font size=3D-1>We all play on Sundays and are, for the most part, church organists not concert = organists.&nbsp; Our forte for hymns and general service playing is different from the = concert literature.&nbsp; Peter Conte, who played two years ago at Grace = Episcopal, elicited the same response from congregants afterward.&nbsp; "Why in all the years since that organ was installed, I never heard it played like that."&nbsp; Ouch, if one is the resident organist, that must = hurt.</font>&nbsp;<font size=3D-1>Your thoughts please.</font>&nbsp;<font size=3D-1>Robert Clooney (Middletown, NY; St. Paul's UMC)</font></blockquote>   </body> </html>   --------------3FA915D8D50A489515E58551--    
(back) Subject: Re: Schmidt Discussion From: <StatRussell@aol.com> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 10:05:56 EDT     --part1_66.d9f87a3.27fdd5c4_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I think DesertBob has it right. There was survival involved with joining = the Nazi Party during WW2. I know 2 people who served on "the other side" 1 = is the father of an Army buddy of mine (He & I Were on Hunter/Killer teams in =   Vietnam together) his father was a captain in the Wehrmacht and a former girlfriend of mine has a father who was an enlisted man in the Luftwaffe. =   They are good and decent men. Don't forget, Wagner also had a great deal = in common with the Nazi's in his attitudes and would have approved (as he was = a rabid anti-semite; why do people have to hate because of their religion?) Let's forgive and move on.   Best to All Dennis R.   --part1_66.d9f87a3.27fdd5c4_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I think DesertBob has = it right. &nbsp;There was survival involved with joining the <BR>Nazi Party during WW2. &nbsp;I know 2 people who served on "the other = side" &nbsp;1 is <BR>the father of an Army buddy of mine (He &amp; I Were on Hunter/Killer = teams in <BR>Vietnam together) his father was a captain in the Wehrmacht and a = former <BR>girlfriend of mine has a father who was an enlisted man in the = Luftwaffe. &nbsp; <BR>They are good and decent men. &nbsp;Don't forget, Wagner also had a = great deal in <BR>common with the Nazi's in his attitudes and would have approved (as he = was a <BR>rabid anti-semite; why do people have to hate because of their = religion?) <BR>Let's forgive and move on. <BR> <BR>Best to All <BR>Dennis R. &nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_66.d9f87a3.27fdd5c4_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Divine Paternity From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 10:32:53 EDT     --part1_21.9d4ff64.27fddc15_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I've never heard of a Church of the Divine Paternity in NYC.   I do know, though, of a Church of the Holy Agony. (Really!) Located on Third Avenue, I think the corner street is 103rd, or somewhere around = there.   That's in "El Barrio". North of the "border" at East 96th Street.   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_21.9d4ff64.27fddc15_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I've never heard of a = Church of the Divine Paternity in NYC. <BR> <BR>I do know, though, of a Church of the Holy Agony. &nbsp;(Really!) = &nbsp;Located on <BR>Third Avenue, I think the corner street is 103rd, or somewhere around = there. <BR> <BR>That's in "El Barrio". &nbsp;&nbsp;North of the "border" at East 96th = Street. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_21.9d4ff64.27fddc15_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Mark Hayes Recital From: "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 07:43:13 -0700 (PDT)   Hi List!   Mark Hayes is coming to my city at the end of this month. Has anyone heard him play? I have seen his name on piano books but did not know that he was an organist too.   There just aren't enough organ recitals in this city. They are too few and far between.:-( I would like to hear my church organist give a recital but have not known of him doing so. Maybe I will suggest it.   Anyone know of anything good coming up in the Atlanta area? I am not too far from there. (l l/2 hr. drive)   Cindy   --- ALamirande@aol.com wrote: > I've never heard of a Church of the Divine Paternity > in NYC. > > I do know, though, of a Church of the Holy Agony. > (Really!) Located on > Third Avenue, I think the corner street is 103rd, or > somewhere around there. > > That's in "El Barrio". North of the "border" at > East 96th Street. > > Arthur LaMirande >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Mark Hayes Recital From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 10:45:49 EDT     --part1_105.14f6aeb.27fddf1d_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Mark Hayes is a justly famous composer and arranger and an incredible pianist. I knew him back in the 80s. But I don't know of his organ abilities. But I would venture a guess that it will be good. He's one of =   those that turns everything to gold (so to speak).   Neil   --part1_105.14f6aeb.27fddf1d_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Mark Hayes is a justly = famous composer and arranger and an incredible <BR>pianist. &nbsp;I knew him back in the 80s. But I don't know of his = organ <BR>abilities. &nbsp;But I would venture a guess that it will be good. = &nbsp;He's one of <BR>those that turns everything to gold (so to speak). <BR> <BR>Neil</FONT></HTML>   --part1_105.14f6aeb.27fddf1d_boundary--  
(back) Subject: I Have Sinned!! (Waaaaay off topic) From: "Cindy Adams" <piperheaven@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 07:46:07 -0700 (PDT)   Dear List,   I think I have just sent a reply with a thread that had nothing to do with my post. Sorry!!   Cindy   (at least it was a short reply :-) )   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail. http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Divine Paternity From: "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@bayou.com> Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2001 09:48:21 -0500   The Church of the Divine Paternity was also known as Fourth Universalist Church, now Univerrsalist Ch. of New York .... it is located at Central Park West and 76th Street. The remains of a Hutchings are still playing in the building.   Sand Lawn      
(back) Subject: Atlanta Recitals From: "hell-concerts" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 16:54:04 +0200   Felix Hell will perform in Atlanta on September 11 at St. Mark United Methodist Church.   Hans-Friedrich Hell   Cindy Adams schrieb:   > Anyone know of anything good coming up in the Atlanta > area? I am not > too far from there. (l l/2 hr. drive) > > Cindy    
(back) Subject: Re: Divine Paternity From: "Kenneth LaFleur" <lafleur@pivot.net> Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2001 11:26:32 -0700   The Church of the Divine Paternity in New York was a large Universalist church, now long gone through various mergers.   Ken LaFleur   ALamirande@aol.com wrote: > > I've never heard of a Church of the Divine Paternity in NYC. > > I do know, though, of a Church of the Holy Agony. (Really!) Located > on > Third Avenue, I think the corner street is 103rd, or somewhere around > there. > > That's in "El Barrio". North of the "border" at East 96th Street. > > Arthur LaMirande