PipeChat Digest #2018 - Thursday, April 12, 2001
 
Diane Bish's arrangements, technique, and the audience
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Easter preludes
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Easter Preludes/Postludes
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Re: Easter Preludes/Postludes
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: first lady-person of the organ
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Easter Preludes
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu>
If the Organist wrote the Wedding Columns
  by "Dan Miller" <dmiller@rodgers.rain.com>
Re: The Palms
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Easter preludes
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Historic Organs of Colorado
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
 

(back) Subject: Diane Bish's arrangements, technique, and the audience From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 06:51:34 EDT     --part1_7a.134cbf6b.2806e2b6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   >>We've had a lot of discussion of Diane Bish's organ playing, but = would=3D20 >>anyone care to say what they think of her organ compositions?<snip>   >Geared to the "weekend" organist and directly at the church crowd.=3DA0 = They=3D20 >are utilitarian church fare that works, but certainly nothing of = enduring=3D20 >quality, although they seem towering indeed when placed next to the = typical=3D =3D20 >Lorenz output!   I play most of her hymn arrangements.....for church and in concert. They = ar=3D e=3D20 popular in both settings. However, while the quality may not be the = most=3D20 "enduring", they require serious technique to play well. What Diane = has=3D20 (that most people don't have) is technique to burn. Just like = Virgil,=3D20 Farnam, Lemare, etc. If you have that kind of technique, you can play = her=3D20 pieces and make them exciting. Definitely above the "weekend" = organist's=3D20 level.   Being a funeral director for my full-time job, I have the opportunity to = hea=3D r=3D20 other "organists" all over the Charlotte, NC area play quite frequently. = I=3D t=3D20 is appalling to hear them butcher even the most simple of things. I've = hear=3D d=3D20 one of Diane's arrangements played at such a slow tempo to be able to = play=3D20 16th notes in a left hand part. I wasn't sure what the piece was. I had = to=3D20 walk over (discretely, of course) to the organ console to look at the book = t=3D o=3D20 see what arrangement the organist was playing. He played it so slowly, = the=3D20 hymn tune was not recognizable. =3D20   It's no wonder churches left and right are getting rid of their organs = and=3D20 organists. We've done it to ourselves...playing is pitiful and the = repetoir=3D e=3D20 is boring. Have you gone to an AGO recital lately? How well was it=3D20 attended? Virgil used to play to packed houses. Diane plays to = packed=3D20 houses. What's wrong with a little showmanship if it draws the = general=3D20 public to the organ. There's a lot of beautiful organ music out there, = but=3D20 it doesn't get played because it's not "correct." We're supposed to = play=3D20 this academic drivel that sounds like a bunch of notes...no music, no=3D20 passion, no life. I for one would rather play a piece that makes the = concer=3D t=3D20 audience experience all the organ's warmth, tonal palette, and something = tha=3D t=3D20 gets to their emotions. When I'm playing for church, I want a piece to = spea=3D k=3D20 to their spiritual side and draw them closer into the presence of God. = =3D20   These kinds of things can't be done if one is trying to play a piece that = is=3D =3D20 technically above their level. When I am directing a funeral at a church, = I=3D =3D20 would rather hear the organist play something simple and do it well, than = tr=3D y=3D20 to do something fancy and screw it up royally. If a person is on the = level=3D20 of a Lorenz publication, fine. Play those things well. Don't try to = play=3D20 something that isabove and beyond your level and do it poorly. Work up to = a=3D =3D20 higher level with lots and lots and lots of practice, have some lessons, = and=3D =3D20 then move to the next level. It takes time to be good. =3D20   Virgil et al. used to practice hours a day. More people need to practice. = =3D20 This applies to myself also. I know that I should be spending several = hours=3D =3D20 a day at the instrument. That's how one develops technique to burn. = Right=3D20 now, most people don't have that kind of technique. =3D20   So, to sum this epistle up, don't bash Diane for her showmanship; don't = bash=3D =3D20 her hymn arrangements (even though they may be formulaic in = compositional=3D20 style, they require technique from hell to play properly, and the = public=3D20 loves them); play what you can, and play it well; and don't alienate = your=3D20 audience by choosing esoteric music to play for church or concert.   Just some thoughts from a full time church musician turned funeral = director,=3D =3D20 but who still plays most every Sunday, in addition to playing concerts = all=3D20 over the place......   Monty Bennett Rock Hill, SC   --part1_7a.134cbf6b.2806e2b6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>&gt;&gt;We've had a = lot o=3D f discussion of Diane Bish's organ playing, but would=3D20 <BR>&gt;&gt;anyone care to say what they think of her organ = compositions?&lt=3D ;snip&gt; <BR> <BR>&gt;Geared to the "weekend" organist and directly at the church = crowd.=3D =3DA0 They=3D20 <BR>&gt;are utilitarian church fare that works, but certainly nothing of = end=3D uring=3D20 <BR>&gt;quality, although they seem towering indeed when placed next to = the=3D20=3D typical=3D20 <BR>&gt;Lorenz output! <BR> <BR>I play most of her hymn arrangements.....for church and in concert. = &nbs=3D p;They are=3D20 <BR>popular in both settings. &nbsp;However, while the quality may not be = th=3D e most=3D20 <BR>"enduring", they require serious technique to play well. &nbsp;What = Dian=3D e has=3D20 <BR>(that most people don't have) is technique to burn. &nbsp;Just like = Virg=3D il,=3D20 <BR>Farnam, Lemare, etc. &nbsp;If you have that kind of technique, you can = p=3D lay her=3D20 <BR>pieces and make them exciting. Definitely above the "weekend" = organist's=3D =3D20 <BR>level. <BR> <BR>Being a funeral director for my full-time job, I have the opportunity = to=3D hear=3D20 <BR>other "organists" all over the Charlotte, NC area play &nbsp;quite = frequ=3D ently. &nbsp;It=3D20 <BR>is appalling to hear them butcher even the most simple of things. = &nbsp;=3D I've heard=3D20 <BR>one of Diane's arrangements played at such a slow tempo to be able to = pl=3D ay=3D20 <BR>16th notes in a left hand part. I wasn't sure what the piece was. I = had=3D20=3D to=3D20 <BR>walk over (discretely, of course) to the organ console to look at the = bo=3D ok to=3D20 <BR>see what arrangement the organist was playing. &nbsp;He played it so = slo=3D wly, the=3D20 <BR>hymn tune was not recognizable. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>It's no wonder churches left and right are getting rid of their organs = a=3D nd=3D20 <BR>organists. &nbsp;We've done it to ourselves...playing is pitiful and = the=3D repetoire=3D20 <BR>is boring. &nbsp;Have you gone to an AGO recital lately? &nbsp;How = well=3D20=3D was it=3D20 <BR>attended? &nbsp;Virgil used to play to packed houses. &nbsp;Diane = plays=3D20=3D to packed=3D20 <BR>houses. &nbsp;What's wrong with a little showmanship if it draws the = gen=3D eral=3D20 <BR>public to the organ. &nbsp;There's a lot of beautiful organ music out = th=3D ere, but=3D20 <BR>it doesn't get played because it's not "correct." &nbsp;We're supposed = t=3D o play=3D20 <BR>this academic drivel that sounds like a bunch of notes...no music, = no=3D20 <BR>passion, no life. &nbsp;I for one would rather play a piece that makes = t=3D he concert=3D20 <BR>audience experience all the organ's warmth, tonal palette, and = something=3D that=3D20 <BR>gets to their emotions. &nbsp;When I'm playing for church, I want a = piec=3D e to speak=3D20 <BR>to their spiritual side and draw them closer into the presence of God. = &=3D nbsp; <BR> <BR>These kinds of things can't be done if one is trying to play a piece = tha=3D t is=3D20 <BR>technically above their level. &nbsp;When I am directing a funeral at = a=3D20=3D church, I=3D20 <BR>would rather hear the organist play something simple and do it well, = tha=3D n try=3D20 <BR>to do something fancy and screw it up royally. &nbsp;If a person is on = t=3D he level=3D20 <BR>of a Lorenz publication, fine. &nbsp;Play those things well. = &nbsp;Don't=3D try to play=3D20 <BR>something that isabove and beyond your level and do it poorly. = &nbsp;Wor=3D k up to a=3D20 <BR>higher level with lots and lots and lots of practice, have some = lessons,=3D and=3D20 <BR>then move to the next level. &nbsp;It takes time to be good. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Virgil et al. used to practice hours a day. &nbsp;More people need to = pr=3D actice. &nbsp; <BR>This applies to myself also. &nbsp;I know that I should be spending = seve=3D ral hours=3D20 <BR>a day at the instrument. &nbsp;That's how one develops technique to = burn=3D .. &nbsp;Right=3D20 <BR>now, most people don't have that kind of technique. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>So, to sum this epistle up, don't bash Diane for her showmanship; = don't=3D20=3D bash=3D20 <BR>her hymn arrangements (even though they may be formulaic in = compositiona=3D l=3D20 <BR>style, they require technique from hell to play properly, and the = public=3D =3D20 <BR>loves them); play what you can, and play it well; and don't alienate = you=3D r=3D20 <BR>audience by choosing esoteric music to play for church or concert. <BR> <BR>Just some thoughts from a full time church musician turned funeral = direc=3D tor,=3D20 <BR>but who still plays most every Sunday, in addition to playing concerts = a=3D ll=3D20 <BR>over the place...... <BR> <BR>Monty Bennett <BR>Rock Hill, SC</FONT></HTML>   --part1_7a.134cbf6b.2806e2b6_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter preludes From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 06:59:17 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001B_01C0C31E.177431E0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   I knew you'd say that!   Glenda   ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: Cremona502@cs.com=3D20   In spite of the many years of having it "significance" pounded into my = =3D head,=3D20 and reading the text over and over, it still escapes me how this piece = =3D can be=3D20 considered appropriate for Easter Morning (or afternoon or evening, =3D for that=3D20 matter). All those minor machinations and a concluding major chord = =3D just=3D20 don't spell resurrection to me!=3D20     ------=3D_NextPart_000_001B_01C0C31E.177431E0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I knew you'd say that!</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Glenda</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: = =3D 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV=3D20 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><B>From:</B>=3D20 <A href=3D3D"mailto:Cremona502@cs.com"=3D20 title=3D3DCremona502@cs.com>Cremona502@cs.com</A> </DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D3D2>In = spite =3D of the many=3D20 years of having it "significance" pounded into my head, <BR>and =3D reading the=3D20 text over and over, it still escapes me how this piece can be =3D <BR>considered=3D20 appropriate for Easter Morning (or afternoon or evening, for that =3D <BR>matter).=3D20 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;All those minor machinations and a concluding major = =3D chord=3D20 just <BR>don't spell resurrection to me!=3D20 <BR></FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001B_01C0C31E.177431E0--    
(back) Subject: Easter Preludes/Postludes From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 07:31:03 -0500   Good Morning:   We use organ/brass for prelude, offertory & hymns. For several years I = have played the Farnam Toccata following benediction & Hallalujah Chorus. After 1 1/2 hours on the bench I think a short postlude welcomed by everyone.   Tom Gregory  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Preludes/Postludes From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 09:36:33 EDT     --part1_f2.933fcb8.28070961_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I wish to second Malcolm's suggestion for "Mors et Resurrectio" of Jean Langlais from Trois Paraphrases Gregoriennes. It makes an OUTSTANDING = Easter Day voluntary as it starts quietly and hauntingly, and then builds to a terrific climax. I generally alternate it every other year with the E = Major Chorale of Cesar Franck. For the closing voluntary I play the Toccata by Widor. In fact, my assistant had never played that piece and learned it = just this year. I think people generally expect something of a grand scale = such as that piece.   And while we are on the subject of organ voluntaries for big feast days, I =   always alternate "March On a Theme By Handel" of Alexandre Guilmant, "Imperial March" of Edward Elgar or "Crown Imperial" by William Walton on Palm Sunday and, without fail, "Puer Natus Est" on Christmas Eve for the voluntary preceding Midnight Mass. I use that piece in between the choral =   presentation and the beginning of the liturgy. There is a wonderful = little gem called "Fanfare on 'Hark! the Herald Angels Sing'" by Gordon Young = (local Detroit composer, now deceased) that is a lot of fun to play and uses absolutely full-organ-plus. It is sort of in the style of a flourish-toccata. This works well on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day as = well if you need something that is by no means challenging, but is fun to play = and makes quite a happy racket. If you want the same style of piece but much more challenging, I suggest "Bring A Torch, Jeanette Isabella" by Keith Chapman.   SCOTT F. FOPPIANO, Principal Organist and Director of Music and Liturgy The National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI (Geo. Kilgen & Son, Opus 5180, 1933) "Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens: fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar."     --part1_f2.933fcb8.28070961_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I wish to second = Malcolm's suggestion for "Mors et Resurrectio" of Jean <BR>Langlais from Trois Paraphrases Gregoriennes. &nbsp;It makes an = OUTSTANDING Easter <BR>Day voluntary as it starts quietly and hauntingly, and then builds to = a <BR>terrific climax. &nbsp;I generally alternate it every other year with = the E Major <BR>Chorale of Cesar Franck. &nbsp;For the closing voluntary I play the = Toccata by <BR>Widor. &nbsp;In fact, my assistant had never played that piece and = learned it just <BR>this year. &nbsp;I think people generally expect something of a grand = scale such <BR>as that piece. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>And while we are on the subject of organ voluntaries for big feast = days, I <BR>always alternate "March On a Theme By Handel" of Alexandre Guilmant, <BR>"Imperial March" of Edward Elgar or "Crown Imperial" by William Walton = on <BR>Palm Sunday and, without fail, "Puer Natus Est" on Christmas Eve for = the <BR>voluntary preceding Midnight Mass. &nbsp;I use that piece in between = the choral <BR>presentation and the beginning of the liturgy. &nbsp;There is a = wonderful little <BR>gem called "Fanfare on 'Hark! the Herald Angels Sing'" by Gordon Young = (local <BR>Detroit composer, now deceased) that is a lot of fun to play and uses <BR>absolutely full-organ-plus. &nbsp;It is sort of in the style of a <BR>flourish-toccata. &nbsp;This works well on Christmas Eve or Christmas = Day as well <BR>if you need something that is by no means challenging, but is fun to = play and <BR>makes quite a happy racket. &nbsp;If you want the same style of piece = but much <BR>more challenging, I suggest "Bring A Torch, Jeanette Isabella" by = Keith <BR>Chapman. <BR> <BR><B>SCOTT F. FOPPIANO</B>, Principal Organist and Director of Music and = Liturgy <BR>The National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI <BR>(Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, Opus 5180, 1933) <BR><I>"Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens: <BR>fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar."</I> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_f2.933fcb8.28070961_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: first lady-person of the organ From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 21:50:44 +0800   I have met in person Gillian twice, the first time of which I had the duty of taking her to lunch at the expense of this city. She is a charming lady and most approachable. She was born in New Zealand and lives in the UK. Maybe the Stars and Stripes does not mean very nmuch to her. So what? As far as her recitals are concerned, and I have heard her a number of times, she does far more than play the notes. She is a wizard. Bob E.     > Mike Gettelman wrote: > I took some "unorganic" friends with me to hear Jillian Weir > play the big Skinner at Severance Hall in February. After > the concert I heard one friend remark, "the music was > beautiful, but the organist had the sense of humor of a root > canal" > > Those of us who know Dame Weir recognize her talent as an > impeccable performance technician, but she did not speak to > the audience, nor did she stray at all from her serious > classical program. Had she encored with Stars and Stripes > Forever, she would have brought the house down.    
(back) Subject: Easter Preludes From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 10:53:01 -0400   Hello--   I am not sticking exclusively to Easter-identified pieces, and I'm not using any of the Bach chorale preludes. Here is our prelude music at Epiphany:   Jesus Christ is Risen Today Calvin Hampton   Canzona (in something or other toni, I forget which, but it's one of the tonier toni) Giovanni Gabrieli, played by the Hudson Valley Brass   Prelude and Fugue in G major, BWV 541 J. S. Bach   Canzona septimi toni Giovanni Gabrieli, played by the Hudson Valley Brass plus yours truly.     Our festive processional music is the Entrata Festiva, opus 93, of Flor Peeters. This is a Fabulous Piece for brass quartet, timp, organ and unison choir. After forty bars of fanfaring, the choir enters in a stentorian unison with "Christus vincit! Christus regnat! Christus imperat!"   We'll sing Jesus Christ is Risen today once the ministers are all = assembled in the chancel.   Naturally, I'm doing the Widor at the end...   I was delighted that the Times picked up our musical offerings for their big spread, "Let the Jubilant Sound of Easter Ring Out Once More," on Friday, April 6.   Another beautiful piece is Howell's Sarabande for the morning of Easter. Not terribly hard and most elegant...   Last night our parish held its first Tenebrae service. The congregation was not very large, but those who attended reported a deeply moving experience. The choir sang the Bruckner "Christus Factus Est" and there was an impressive roll of thunder at the end as the Christ candle re-appeared.     Wishing you all a most wonderful Triduum and Easter...   Jonathan      
(back) Subject: If the Organist wrote the Wedding Columns From: "Dan Miller" <dmiller@rodgers.rain.com> Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 07:55:16 PDT   (thought you'd enjoy this, emailed to me from a friend) -------------------------------------------------------------------   On Saturday, the fifth of August, at well after 2:00 p.m., Ann Jones  and Bob Smith were married at Our Lady of Sorry Acoustics.   The groom wore a dark suit and the bride wore a dress.   The organ is a rebuild by Harvey Piston Shotz VI of a 2m Handyman Special which contains pipework from the original Ox tracker that existed before  the fire.   There were attendants all over the place, but the organist still only  got 3/4 of the way through "The Prince of Denmark March," with no  repeats, ending on the dominant.   The organist played the first four phrases of the Schubert "Ave  Maria" while the couple did something after the vows.   The bride's sister's best friends's adopted niece sang "The Wedding  Song" from the balcony, without interludes (The organist left them  in). It didn't matter, because she used the microphone.   The recessional was the Mendelssohn.   The bride and groom went to college, but did not take any music  appreciation courses.    
(back) Subject: Re: The Palms From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 12:32:40 EDT     --part1_2d.a445a9e.280732a8_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 4/11/01 7:47:34 PM Pacific Daylight Time, Innkawgneeto@cs.com writes:     > > >> Does a recording exist of this song? > >   For shame!!! If anyone wants a recording of this piece, please contact me =   and I find a way to make it! Geez... It ain't Stanford, but it's not = that bad!!! ;-)   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_2d.a445a9e.280732a8_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 4/11/01 7:47:34 PM Pacific Daylight Time, <BR>Innkawgneeto@cs.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Does a recording = exist of this song?</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>For shame!!! &nbsp;If anyone wants a recording of this piece, please = contact me <BR>and I find a way to make it! &nbsp;&nbsp;Geez... &nbsp;&nbsp;It ain't = Stanford, but it's not that <BR>bad!!! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ = &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_2d.a445a9e.280732a8_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter preludes From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 12:55:15 EDT     --part1_38.14d291a6.280737f3_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 4/12/01 5:02:27 AM Pacific Daylight Time, gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com writes:     > I knew you'd say that! >   I'm touched!!!! you 'memberd'!!! ;-)   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_38.14d291a6.280737f3_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 4/12/01 5:02:27 AM Pacific Daylight Time, <BR>gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I knew you'd say = that! <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>I'm touched!!!! you 'memberd'!!! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_38.14d291a6.280737f3_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Historic Organs of Colorado From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 14:16:03 -0400   Historic Organs of Colorado is a brand new set of four compact discs produced by the Organ Historical Society and featuring 23 pipe organs and two harmoniums with 27 organists including Tom Murray, Will Headlee, Peter Sykes, Bruce Stevens, Fred Hohman, George Bozeman, and Charles Rus playing 45 compositions by Richard Purvis (5 works), Kodaly, Easthope Martin, = Gordon Balch Nevin, Fleury, Karg-Elert, Thayer, Warlock, and many more. Organs by Kimball, Welte, Roosevelt, Hook & Hastings, Schuelke, Farrand & Votey, Austin, Wirsching, Ryder, Steere, Kilgen, and more.   A full list of all the works, players, and organs appears at http://www.ohscatalog.org when one clicks on the very first item listed on the opening page.   There are also similar multiple-CD sets available for organs in Michigan, Connecticut, San Francisco, Baltimore, New Orleans, Milwaukee, Maine, Louisville, and Phildelphia. Descriptions are available when one clicks = on the second item on the opening page.   A note to those whose performances appear on this CD: OHS will be sending you a gratis copy of the CD today!   Bill Van Pelt