PipeChat Digest #2024 - Saturday, April 14, 2001
 
Re: Peragallo
  by "Antoni Scott" <ascott@epix.net>
Re: Interesting new Disney Hall organ
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Disney Organ's Not THAT Bad, it's WORSE
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Disney's not THAT bad!  It's WORSE!
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Cheap CDs
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
DIsney and art history
  by "Panning" <jpanning@cal-net.net>
Joining OHS
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
Blower oil (was: emergency organ advice sought)
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Blower oil
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: DIsney and art history
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Cheap CDs
  by "Greg Corbett" <corbettg@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Disney's not THAT bad!  It's WORSE!
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
Re: Cheap CDs
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Todd Wilson at Severance Hall (Long)
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: DIsney and art history
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Cheap CDs
  by <AMADPoet@aol.com>
"Chatty" recitalists
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Peragallo From: "Antoni Scott" <ascott@epix.net> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 07:20:16 -0400   Hi John:   Peragallo has some good and no so good organs. I heard and played a nice three manual organ in Newton and Succasunna , New Jersey. Most of the churches in the area are short on money so the "Peragallo" organs usually comprises of an upgrade or enlargement using previous pipework. I suppose there is nothing wrong with that. Given a blank check I suppose they could do some super stuff.     Antoni  
(back) Subject: Re: Interesting new Disney Hall organ From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 20:29:02 +0800       Bruce Dersch wrote: > > Dessert Bob > With or without ice cream? Bob Elms    
(back) Subject: Re: Disney Organ's Not THAT Bad, it's WORSE From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 10:47:42 EDT     --part1_84.1456329a.2809bd0e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 4/13/01 6:31:12 PM Pacific Daylight Time, mswal@adelphia.net writes:     > They pushed through the "Mickey Mouse" bill, which extends copyright > protection, meaning we will have to wait another 20 years or so before > anymore music comes out into the public domain. > >   Oh no! They'll copyright the facade design and NOBODY will be able to use =   it!!   Oh grief! Oh gloom! Oh.....   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_84.1456329a.2809bd0e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 4/13/01 6:31:12 PM Pacific Daylight Time, <BR>mswal@adelphia.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000ff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px">They pushed through the "Mickey Mouse" bill, which extends copyright <BR>protection, meaning we will have to wait another 20 years or so before =   <BR>anymore music comes out into the public domain. &nbsp; <BR> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Oh no! &nbsp;They'll copyright the facade design and NOBODY will be = able to use <BR>it!! <BR> <BR>Oh grief! &nbsp;Oh gloom! &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Oh..... <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_84.1456329a.2809bd0e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Disney's not THAT bad! It's WORSE! From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 11:07:43 EDT     --part1_66.df2469a.2809c1bf_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 4/13/01 7:52:17 PM Pacific Daylight Time, jlspeller@mindspring.com writes:     > In this respect I would liken it to the "Hand of God" organ > case that was done some years ago in France. But please, when someone = has > finally managed to produce an organ case design that is genuinely = original > and > creative, please don't knock it. >   I think the "Hand of God" case is very attractive and creative and fresh. =   However, I would not place it in the same category as the "Wrath of God" = .... oh gee, what is the word: not design... not case....   oh heck, we'll just rhymn it: the "Wrath of God Facade".   I think it looks like something Hook and Hastings might have tried on a = night after too much "mountain dew". It's disappointing to me, since there = are so many other modern and outrageous possibilities for a facade.   Yet, I won't say that I hate it. It's still very strange appearning, but = I think this is one that will have to be seen, up close and personal, before = a final judgment of merit can be made. As far as the stoplist, that also = can appear bizarre on paper and be dull as toast in reality. I, however, cannot fathom the combination of builders and finishers on this organ = coming up with something dull.   Now if all of the people so far involved can produce an exciting = instrument, I certainly hope that the organists who play it will use it to fullest = (and not necessarily loudest) advantage, both tonally and with regard to repertoire.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_66.df2469a.2809c1bf_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 4/13/01 7:52:17 PM Pacific Daylight Time, <BR>jlspeller@mindspring.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">In this respect I = would liken it to the "Hand of God" organ <BR>case that was done some years ago in France. &nbsp;But please, when = someone has <BR>finally managed to produce an organ case design that is genuinely = original <BR>and <BR>creative, please don't knock it. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I think the "Hand of God" case is very attractive and creative and = fresh. &nbsp; <BR>However, I would not place it in the same category as the "Wrath of = God" .... <BR>oh gee, what is the word: <BR>not design... <BR>not case.... <BR> <BR>oh heck, &nbsp;we'll just rhymn it: &nbsp;the "Wrath of God Facade". <BR> <BR>I think it looks like something Hook and Hastings might have tried on = a night <BR>after too much "mountain dew". &nbsp;&nbsp;It's disappointing to me, = since there &nbsp;are <BR>so many other modern and outrageous possibilities for a facade. <BR> <BR>Yet, I won't say that I hate it. &nbsp;It's still very strange = appearning, but I <BR>think this is one that will have to be seen, up close and personal, = before a <BR>final judgment of merit can be made. &nbsp;&nbsp;As far as the = stoplist, that also can <BR>appear bizarre on paper and be dull as toast in reality. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I, however, <BR>cannot fathom the combination of builders and finishers on this organ = coming <BR>up with something dull. <BR> <BR>Now if all of the people so far involved can produce an exciting = instrument, <BR>I certainly hope that the organists who play it will use it to fullest = (and <BR>not necessarily loudest) advantage, both tonally and with regard to <BR>repertoire. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_66.df2469a.2809c1bf_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Cheap CDs From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 11:09:31 EDT     --part1_9d.141b049d.2809c22b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 4/13/01 8:14:43 PM Pacific Daylight Time, = AMADPoet@aol.com writes:     > But > enough of that new stuff, tell us who recorded the Bach before we have a =   > mutiny on our hands! >   As I mentioned, the tape is unmarked. If whomever sent me the tape can remember, they can then clear up the dilemma.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_9d.141b049d.2809c22b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 4/13/01 8:14:43 PM Pacific Daylight Time, AMADPoet@aol.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">But <BR>enough of that new stuff, tell us who recorded the Bach before we have = a <BR>mutiny on our hands! <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>As I mentioned, the tape is unmarked. &nbsp;If whomever sent me the = tape can <BR>remember, &nbsp;they can then clear up the dilemma. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_9d.141b049d.2809c22b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: DIsney and art history From: "Panning" <jpanning@cal-net.net> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 10:19:58 -0500   DeserTBob writes:   >> Even money says Salonen gets run out of town also for championing this mess, hall and organ inclusive. Kids don't patronize places like concert halls on a regular basis; subscribing = patrons do. And to that segment of the population, silliness like this can only raise titters of mocking laughter, thus destroying any artistic merit of both the organ AND the venue. <<   Although our resident sage is not likely swayed by arguments based on artistic grounds, I think it should be evident to all that the artistic merit a work possesses cannot be destroyed by "titters of mocking laughter". A casual acquaintance with architectural or music history provides countless examples of works that were decried by the "experts" at the opening but have been subsequently acclaimed as masterpieces. And we recall that even within the lifetime of some of our list members, the very notion of placing organ pipes in visible functional arrays was condemned = as artistic barbarism. The irony that a design principle once considered the work of philistines is now regarded by many list members as the pinnacle = of modern organ design seems lost on Disney's detractors. Is there a lesson here for the self-styled prognosticators?   John A. Panning Lake City, Iowa      
(back) Subject: Joining OHS From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 11:25:01 -0400   Alan B wrote to PipeChat: "I have tried repeatedly to join the OHS with no success . . ."   I'm sorry you had trouble joining OHS and I would like to know the circumstances if you would please write to me privately about it.   For the record, one may join OHS trouble-free by writing a check for $35 and dropping it in the snail-mail to OHS, Box 26811, Richmond VA 23261. If you're 25 years of age or fewer, send $19. If you're 65 or greater, send $29. Or, send more if you like!   Bill  
(back) Subject: Blower oil (was: emergency organ advice sought) From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 11:46:09 -0500   At 10:53 AM 4/13/01 -0700, DeserTBoB wrote: >Laukauf's lubrication specification should indeed be >consulted, and the proper base stock and grade of oil obtained >locally. I'm still willing to bet good money it's light amber turbine = oil, >however.   Laukhuff sells two types of oil for their "Ventus" brand blowers. The larger, slow-speed machines (with ring bearings) get one sort, which is presumably a light grade machine oil of some kind. The smaller, = high-speed machines (sleeve bearings) take a lightweight *synthetic* oil formulation. Unfortunately, the Laukhuff catalog (or the labels on the oil bottles themselves) does not specify exactly *what* the formulation of either is (though I think the blower spec sheets do...).   Meidinger blowers have similar style bearings to the Ventus machines, and I'd think they would be happy with *either* Laukhuff oil, or indeed any other good quality light machine oil. As Bob points out, it would be preferable to not mix 'n match oil types in the same motor -- if you can determine what sort of oil has been used in this motor in the past (assuming that it was not just the "oilcan in the boiler room"), use something similar.   The thing about these small blowers (very much unlike old Spencers, Kinetics, etc) is that they do not NEED frequent oiling. The spec sheets that come with the (Ventus) machines specify something like a couple of drops every 10,000 hours of operation...any more than that is just a waste of expensive oil, and will eventually end up on the floor under the = blower.   Fortunately, over oiling the things won't *hurt* them -- as "10,000 hours" just *seems* too long to wait for oilings to many people, and thus many of these machines I've seen are indeed over-oiled by the conciensous church sexton, who faithfully fills up the oil cups every 6 months (just like he did to the big blower on the old organ in the old church, for the previous 47 years...<g>). Makes rather a mess of the blower area...but the motor couldn't care less.   I can honestly say that I have seen more of these blowers fried due to electrical supply mishaps than due to bad bearings...so I guess whatEVER they are doing with those bearings must work well! Drop a leg of the 3-phase, OTOH..., and watch 'em smoke!!   Cheers all --   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR          
(back) Subject: Blower oil From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 13:12:29 -0400   In an earlier life, (when I was much younger), I trained with an = Instrument Maker. Where I worked was an elderly gentleman who brought his alarm = clock for me to repair.   I really did not have to do much to it at all, for when I took the back off, loads of light oil poured out, and having cleaned it all up the clock =   was as good as new. When I gave it back to him, he told me that it had been a Wedding present over 50 years old, and he had "oiled" it regularly every Saturday for all that time!   However, I got my own back on him, for I had wound it up, and set the = alarm for 6.00 PM, which would be just as he was on the trolley going home. As the alarm clock was of the variety known as a Post Office alarm, which was =   good and loud, I felt that I got my revenge for having my clean bench top smothered with oil!   The following morning some of my friends, who were on the same trolley, told me that he was going to "murder the little sod"! When he came in, I was pleased to find that he had seen the joke, and bore me no grudge!   Keeping on to organ matters, I reckon that any light machine oil would be OK for an organ blower's bearings, - just don't oil it too often!   The "Oily Boid" gets the worm!   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: DIsney and art history From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 10:06:23 -0700   At 10:19 AM 4/14/2001 -0500, you wrote: >The irony that a design principle once considered the >work of philistines is now regarded by many list members as the pinnacle = of >modern organ design seems lost on Disney's detractors. Is there a lesson >here for the self-styled prognosticators?<snip>   We've ALL heard this argument before, thank you. Since Greco-Roman times, =   architecture has, in some way or another, sought to find resonating = harmony with the human psyche. The "barbarism" mentioned of exposed ranks of functioning pipes was an exercise in "form follows function", something which will find resonance with the practical side of ones mentality, much as did the now-reviving Bauhaus school. One must analyze said "exposed ranks" and find that the mathematical relationships of the pipes to each other delight the mind in their mathematical order and relative complexity. However, I submit that "Wizzley" has no such "hook" to = delight the beholder. Rather, Gehry has chosen his favorite mode of recent expression, chaos, to make his statement. The well-adjusted mind does not =   revel in chaos, and will naturally seek to eliminate it with order in one form or another. Thus, I find the time-worn missive that "what was once reviled is now art" to be possibly not applicable here. For every work of =   the various arts that was "misunderstood" upon its creation only to be loved later, there are probably many more examples that remained "misunderstood" and disappeared into the dustbin of history. I'm willing to bet that "Wizzley" will be one such example.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Cheap CDs From: "Greg Corbett" <corbettg@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 10:56:01 -0700   If it is the tape that I think it is Bruce, it should be:   The Organ Works - J.S.Bach, Organist - Peter Hurford London 444 410-2 17 CD set, not for the faint of pocket book, and not as the e-mail title suggests either, I think I paid $140.00 for it, but felt as a reference, it was worth it.    
(back) Subject: Re: Disney's not THAT bad! It's WORSE! From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 13:05:24 -0500   Is it really a tracker? I don't mind the looks too much. (after all, it is Disney) I may want to get there some time and hear it. But,,, the building looks like a sailing ship. It seems to me it would be 'gone with the wind.' Luther    
(back) Subject: Re: Cheap CDs From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 11:15:46 -0700   At 10:56 AM 4/14/2001 -0700, you wrote: > The Organ Works - J.S.Bach, Organist - Peter Hurford > London 444 410-2<snip>   $140's nothing to sneeze at, but I've heard Hurford over the years perform =   various works of Bach and consider him to be an authoritative performer of =   Bach's works. FAR cheaper was the Walter Kraft "VoxBox" set of LPs, = fairly poorly recorded and pressed, later re-released by "Murray Hill Records" in =   the US in the '80s. These show up on eBay from time to time for not much money. Kraft tends toward a scholastic presentation of Bach. Of interest =   in this collection was the surviving examples of Baroque organ building he =   played throughout Germany, Austria and Holland to make the recordings. = If one has a very clean set of these discs and can mentally "filter" some of the engineering and recording equipment goofs as one listens, it's a very =   cost effective "reference set". Of course, for about the same money, one could also collect a lot of old Biggs LPs, far better engineered and recorded, but all you hear is Flentrop, Flentrop, FLENTROP!   dB    
(back) Subject: Todd Wilson at Severance Hall (Long) From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 14:48:53 -0400   Hi Everyone,   Last night I attended the performance of Todd Wilson at the Norton Memorial Organ in Severance Hall. I was utterly and totally delighted by Todd's performance, and the Skinner was spectacular, demonstrating color and depth beyond anything I had heard from this instrument in the 2 previous concerts in this dedication series.   Mr. Wilson's program selection was most entertaining, and his remarks to the audience before each selection gave him a very friendly presence, and gave us guidance for what to expect from each piece. The fact that most of the music was highly recognizable also added to the relaxation and enjoyment of the program for the audience. Todd most assuredly puts on a great show.   Todd kicked off the show with Bach's Toccata and Fugue in Dm which allowed us to savor the Skinner's tonal colors in a way that might not be possible with less recognizable literature. His interpretation was very unique, and I was again amazed at how different this piece can sound at the hands (and feet) of an organist who is not afraid to impart a judicious amount of artistic freedom without staying too far from Bach's original intent.   The second selection was Come, Sweet Death based on a chorale by Bach, and arranged by Virgil Fox. I had not heard this piece before, but due to Todd's preparatory remarks about the gradual crescendo from the quietist stops, up to full organ, and back down again, it created an anticipatory thrill, as the addition of stops progressed towards the climax, and then were removed one by one as the piece faded into nothingness. It left me wanting to hear this beautiful music again and again in the future, and the magnificence shown by the Skinner left me breathless. What an extreme treat.   Next we enjoyed Dance macabre by Saint-Saens (apology for lack of diacritical) arranged by Edwin Lemare. This delightful and familiar piece was preceded by Todd's remarks on the history of the piece, how it was appropriate for Friday the13th, and that it was technically a difficult piece for the organist, but that he would "do his best for us". Of course he performed it perfectly, and we all marveled at Todd's athletic ability as he crossed hands, crossed feet, and changed registrations like it was nothing at all. Again, what a fine treat.   During intermission, I spoke with the people around me including some friends who had spent 12 hours on an Amtrack train just to hear this organ, and it was obvious that everyone was thrilled. But the best was yet to come. We watched as a giant movie screen was pulled up on center stage, and the organ console was shifted to a position to the right of the screen (isn't electronic action wonderful). This was done in preparation for a viewing of the original silent movie, The Phantom of the Opera, with Lon Chaney, to which Todd played an original accompaniment that captured all of the suspense, humor, and scene relevance in a masterful way. It was simply and totally spectacular. Considering that the movie is about 30 minutes long, and Todd played with many registration changes and improvised themes, it was obviously a gigantic workout for him. I am awed by his stamina.   The movie and Todd's performance ended in a unanimous standing ovation for him from a most appreciative audience who seemed to sense that asking him for an encore after the strenuous workout he had just delivered, was a bit over the top of reasonability. It would have been quite difficult to follow his amazing performance in any event. Many members of the audience seem to linger on in the Hall rather than the mass exodus you normally see at the end of a concert. It was as if we were all wanting to savor the musical "buzz" we had recieved for a little while longer.   Some of you may remember my amateur reviews of the other 2 previous concerts in this dedication series in which I suggested that perhaps this instrument did not have quite enough foundation to serve as a solo concert instrument in the beautiful Severance Hall. I hereby retract that opinion and have garnered a new respect for the presence and power of the Norton Memorial Organ. I extend my heartfelt congratulations to Mr. E.M. Skinner for designing such a wonderful tonal pallet, to The Shantz Organ Company for resurrecting this historic gem for the Cleveland community, and to the Severance Hall Foundation for making such excellent decisions regarding the restoration design of the Norton Memorial Organ. It is but another large feather in the cap of a city that has witnessed the rebirth of itself as a truly great place to live, a leading supporter of the performance arts, and a wonderful place in which to be an organ lover.   In finish, I would ask to be allowed your indulgence for any mistakes or inaccuracies I may have made in the creation of this post. I am an admitted "rank" amateur, and I may have overlooked some grammatical correctness in all my excitement. This night was a major highlight in my newfound appreciation for the pipe organ. I am lucky to be alive to experience such wonder.   Sincerely Mike Gettelman    
(back) Subject: Re: DIsney and art history From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 14:55:42 EDT   Hi John:   I know you like the Disney Facade. How about something similar for the Cardinal Mahoney Memeorial Chapel? The pipes collapse when the wind is off and rise to full height when the wind is on, sort of a flexable = case work. With flexable wind they would kind of sag and rise with the wind demand. I like that! Go to it pal! I know YOU Guys can do this.   Ron Severin Tongue firmly in cheek!  
(back) Subject: Re: Cheap CDs From: <AMADPoet@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 15:16:43 EDT   In a message dated 4/14/01 10:10:50 AM Central Daylight Time, Cremona502@cs.com writes:   << As I mentioned, the tape is unmarked. If whomever sent me the tape can =   remember, they can then clear up the dilemma. >>   Sorry to make you repeat yourself, Bruce. I just couldn't help but milk = this thing- the nerve, leading us on like that! ;o)   annnnd....   Greg Corbett writes: <<The Organ Works - J.S.Bach, Organist - Peter Hurford London 444 410-2 17 CD set, not for the faint of pocket book, and not as the e-mail title suggests either, I think I paid $140.00 for it, but felt as a reference, it was worth it. >>   This set is only put back in print every solar eclipse it seems, at least = in my corner of the world. Luckily, it does appear on ebay fairly regularly, usually going for about 85-130 $. Anyone interested in Hurford's interpretations of Bach, or in PH himself, should check out the interview = in Choir & Organ (Nov/Dec 2000). What a guy!   Mandy  
(back) Subject: "Chatty" recitalists From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2001 12:25:23 -0700   At 02:48 PM 4/14/2001 -0400, you wrote: >Mr. Wilson's program selection was most entertaining, and his >remarks to the audience before each selection gave him a very friendly >presence, and gave us guidance for what to expect from each piece.<snip>   Thanks for the review; it is most welcomed, as are any that are posted.   However, this opens a new area for discussion, that of the "chatty" recitalist. I was pretty much taught to follow the example of concert pianists of my time, who never spoke, except perhaps to the press after a performance. One would come in, take an initial bow to (hopefully) welcoming applause, and then head to the console and "do one's stuff", and =   hopefully get applause afterwards, to which an encore would be provided, = IF one didn't feel needles from disapproving eyes in the audience. Now, it seems that we've come from a brief statement at the head end of a recital to being lrather ike theater organists, who seem wont to "work the crowd" in between selections. I note Dame Weir took some heat from someone on = the list for having this rather aloof posture, but I find it quite dignified and proper. Although I'm trained in public speaking and have no animus towards speaking to the crowd, I find the current trend rather = undignified, preferring instead to author an informative recital program headed out at the door. Of course, my opinion is moot, since I haven't "recitaled" in years. Opinions?   dB