PipeChat Digest #2037 - Thursday, April 19, 2001
 
Christ lag in Todesbanden
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
RE: Christ Lag in Todesbanden; was: Easter preludes
  by "Mike Swaldo" <mswal@adelphia.net>
Francaix: Suite Carmelite
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
Fwd:  Marco Enrico Bossi
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Re: Easter Postlude: correction
  by <JKVDP@aol.com>
RE: Christ Lag in Todesbanden; was: Easter preludes
  by "Randy Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Short organists only need apply
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
Re: Fwd: Marco Enrico Bossi
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
Widor: 5th symphony
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Re: Marco Enrico Bossi
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Tournemire
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Todesbanden vs. Lind <g>
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
pump organ
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Todesbanden vs. Lind <g>
  by "Ben Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net>
Re: Widor: 5th Symphony
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Christ lag in Todesbanden From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 05:31:12 EDT     --part1_29.13a19c0d.28100a60_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   On Easter Sunday, at the 11 a.m. High Mass, Raymond Daveluy played Christ = lag in Todesbanden at l'Oratoire St. Joseph, Montreal, following the Communion =   motet (choir, a capella, contemporary polyphonic).   M. Daveluy played the cantus firmus on a solo reed stop, the other voices being on principal stops. An unusual and very effective way to present = this well-known piece.   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_29.13a19c0d.28100a60_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>On Easter Sunday, at = the 11 a.m. High Mass, Raymond Daveluy played Christ lag <BR>in Todesbanden at l'Oratoire St. Joseph, Montreal, following the = Communion <BR>motet (choir, a capella, contemporary polyphonic). <BR> <BR>M. Daveluy played the cantus firmus on a solo reed stop, the other = voices <BR>being on principal stops. &nbsp;An unusual and very effective way to = present this <BR>well-known piece. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_29.13a19c0d.28100a60_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Christ Lag in Todesbanden; was: Easter preludes From: "Mike Swaldo" <mswal@adelphia.net> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 07:12:34 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000A_01C0C8A0.1B24E820 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Bruce Wrote: BUT..... the particular setting by JSB does not have an Easter sound. I'm sure that Durufle could do something wonderfully suitable. Bach did something very academic and beautiful, but it does not do for me (hence, possibly for others) what is needed. [Mike S. ]   I like these pieces very much, and have used several of them over the years.   Bach's intent when writing the Orgelbuechlein was for educational educational purposes. His intent was to show the different ways one could treat a chorale, since in normal practice, organists imporvised preludes baserd on chorales. Bach would probably be quite surprised to learn that people actually play these things for church.   Mike           ------=3D_NextPart_000_000A_01C0C8A0.1B24E820 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2614.3500" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN = class=3D3D920060411-19042001>Bruce=3D20 Wrote:</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT =3D size=3D3D2>BUT.....=3D20 &nbsp;the particular setting by JSB does not have an Easter sound. =3D &nbsp;I'm=3D20 <BR>sure that Durufle could do something wonderfully suitable.=3D20 &nbsp;&nbsp;Bach did <BR>something very academic and beautiful, but it = =3D does=3D20 not do for me (hence, <BR>possibly for others) what is needed. =3D <BR><FONT=3D20 color=3D3D#0000ff></FONT><FONT size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D920060411-19042001>[Mike S.=3D20 ]&nbsp;</SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff><FONT=3D20 size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D920060411-19042001></SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff><FONT=3D20 size=3D3D2><SPAN class=3D3D920060411-19042001>I like these pieces very = =3D much, and have=3D20 used several of them over the years.&nbsp; =3D </SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff><FONT=3D20 size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D920060411-19042001></SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff><FONT=3D20 size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D920060411-19042001></SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT><FONT=3D20 face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT = color=3D3D#0000ff><FONT =3D size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D920060411-19042001>Bach's intent when writing the =3D Orgelbuechlein=3D20 was&nbsp;for educational educational purposes.&nbsp; His intent was to = =3D show=3D20 the different ways one could treat a chorale, since in normal =3D practice,=3D20 organists imporvised preludes baserd on chorales.&nbsp; Bach would =3D probably be=3D20 quite surprised to learn that people actually play these things for=3D20 church.&nbsp;</SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff><FONT=3D20 size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D920060411-19042001></SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff><FONT=3D20 size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D920060411-19042001>Mike</SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff><FONT=3D20 size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D920060411-19042001></SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff><FONT=3D20 size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D920060411-19042001></SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff><FONT=3D20 size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D920060411-19042001></SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff><FONT=3D20 size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D920060411-19042001></SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></BLOC= =3D KQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000A_01C0C8A0.1B24E820--    
(back) Subject: Francaix: Suite Carmelite From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 07:45:09 -0400   Steven wrote: "I have just purchased the music to Jean Francais's "Suite Carmelite" and I would like to know if anyone out there knows of a recording of these charming pieces."   Yes, there is one available from the OHS Catalog http://www.ohscatalog.org   It is imported by OHS and is number ELCD-028 on the Lade label, a CD entitled "The Sun Organ." It is easiest to find this disc by using the Search Engine at the bottom of the opening page of the catalog. Enter the name Francaix and push go. A link to the full entry for the recording will appear in a moment. Click on the link. Or call OHS at 804-353-9226 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday.   The musical Reinhard Selliger plays. Repertoire on the CD includes:   BUXTEHUDE: Passacaglia in d, BuxWV 161 FRANCAIX: Suite Carm=E9lite LEIDEL: Toccata delectatione, op. 5 MENDELSSOHN: Sonata IV in B, Op. 65, No. 4 KUCHAR: Fantasie in d BACH: Sonata No. 1 in E-flat BWV 525; Toccata & Fugue in d BWV 565 WALTHER: Concerto of Sign. Meck ANON. POLISH: Przygrywka choralowa =97 Colenda   The Sun Organ is named for the remarkable case built by Johann Conrad B=FCchau ca. 1700 for the large Church of St. Peter and Paul in the German town of G=F6rlitz on the river at the border with Poland. B=FCchau = dispersed 17 =93suns=94 symmetrically over the front of the case, arranging pipes of the Pedal Mixture XII as the spokes of a wheel in each =93sun=94 and = capping the center of each with a golden disc. Within the case was a 3m organ of 57 stops completed after six years of effort, in 1703, by the famed Eugenio Casparini who was 74 years old when he started the project in 1697. It became the most famous organ in Silesia, but Andreas Silbermann wrote after a visit, =93I would be much more fond of it if I had not played and heard it myself . . .=94 It was entirely replaced in 1928 by an electropneumatic organ which no longer played by 1978 and was removed from the historic case, wherein the famous =93Sun Mixture=94 remained along with 29 pipes of a wooden Onda Maris.   Mathis built a brand new organ in the case in 1997, with 64 stops on three manuals including 2 stops at 32=92 pitch as well as recreations of stops and devices in the original Sun organ, including several bird calls and drums.   Bill  
(back) Subject: Fwd: Marco Enrico Bossi From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 15:12:53 -0000   --- In musiclassical@y..., ALamirande@a... wrote: Marco Enrico Bossi (1861 - 1925) was, in his time, the foremost organist in Italy, and a significant composer. He formed a triumvirate at the turn of the century with Martucci and Sgambati. All three composers seemed to have fallen into oblivion in subsequent generations.   Bossi composed operas and much instrumental and choral music, none of which is performed nowadays outside of Italy, and not very much there. He is best remembered for his organ works and an organ concerto. These, too, however, are not much performed nowadays.   In 1999, during the summer concert series at l'Oratoire St. Joseph in Montreal (the "theme" of which was Franz Schmidt), German organist Willibald Guggenmos programmed a major work by Bossi: Theme and Variations, op. 131. The music critic dismissed it as "academic". (The same program included Franz Schmidt's Chaconne, and that received high praise from the music critic, both for the musical content of the work and for the performance.)   I have a few works by Bossi in my library, but have never played them in public. I tend to concur with the assessment of the Montreal music critic: academic. His choral works, though, might be more interesting and worthy of revival: e.g., the Canticum canticorum for mezzo-soprano, baritone, chorus, orchestra, and organ, composed 1900; Il paradiso perduto (after Milton) for soloists, chorus, orchestra, and organ, composed 1902; Giovanna d'Arco (after Orsini) for similar forces; and S. Caterina da Siena.   He also composed a Konzertstuck for organ, brass, tympani, and strings (1908), and a Fantasia sinfonica for organ, brass, harp, tympani, and strings (1923). Never having heard these works, I can't comment on them, but the instrumental combinations do sound interesting.   Bossi had the unique experience (for a composer) of dying at sea (1925, while returning to Italy on an ocean liner from New York).   Arthur LaMirande --- End forwarded message ---      
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Postlude: correction From: <JKVDP@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 12:34:55 EDT   In a message dated 4/18/01 4:07:43 PM Pacific Daylight Time, ALamirande@aol.com writes:   << (My views on hymn-singing are, I think, already quite well known.) >>   Have these views been on this list? I think I'm interested - or am I opening a can of worms? Jerry in Seattle  
(back) Subject: RE: Christ Lag in Todesbanden; was: Easter preludes From: "Randy Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 14:01:39 -0500   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1224415592=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii" ; format=3D"flowed"   > >Bach's intent when writing the Orgelbuechlein was for educational >educational purposes. His intent was to show the different ways one >could treat a chorale, since in normal practice, organists >imporvised preludes baserd on chorales. Bach would probably be >quite surprised to learn that people actually play these things for >church. > >Mike   Yes, but some of them are quite wonderful and effective, like "O Mensch, bewein, " "When We In Deepest Need," and "Liebster Jesu."   Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu Organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church Cincinnati, Ohio --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1224415592=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Content-Type: text/enriched; charset=3D"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <excerpt><paraindent><param>right,left</param>   <fontfamily><param>Arial</param><color><param>0000,0000,FFFF</param><smalle= r=3D >Bach's intent when writing the Orgelbuechlein was for educational educational purposes. His intent was to show the different ways one could treat a chorale, since in normal practice, organists imporvised preludes baserd on chorales. Bach would probably be quite surprised to learn that people actually play these things for church.=3D20   =3D20   Mike   </smaller></color></fontfamily></paraindent></excerpt><fontfamily><param>Ar= i=3D al</param><color><param>0000,0000,FFFF</param><smaller>   </smaller></color></fontfamily>Yes, but some of them are quite wonderful and effective, like "O Mensch, bewein, " "When We In Deepest Need," and "Liebster Jesu."   Randy Runyon   runyonr@muohio.edu   Organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church   Cincinnati, Ohio   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1224415592=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D--  
(back) Subject: Short organists only need apply From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 14:08:25 EDT   I thought y'all might enjoy an account of a gig call I received earlier = this week:   Phone rings DJ "Hello" CALLER "Are you short?" "Excuse me?" "I need a short organist. Are you short?" "You'll really have to identify yourself and give me a reason you are = asking that before I'll answer."   The woman went on to explain she'd gotten my phone number from the = musician's union directory listing of organists, and that she's production supervisor =   with Steven Spielberg on a film being shot at the end of this week and = they need a short organist for a scene.   I was sorry to have to reply both that I am decidedly not short ("How = short are you?" "6 foot 1 inch" "That's not short" "Yes, that's true") and I = can't be there anyway since I'm debuting my new score to the silent METROPOLIS = at the Castro Theatre this weekend in San Francisco. I suggested she contact =   one of my perhaps more height-challenged colleagues . . . oh, they never prepared me for this one at ol' I.U.   Dennis James  
(back) Subject: Re: Fwd: Marco Enrico Bossi From: <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw> Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2001 02:09:15 +0800 (CST)   I happen to like Bossi's work, Choral --- I have it in a collection of his works that was published by Boston Music Company... probably that collection is out of print --- I don't know...   I first heard the piece on a record by Ashley Miller played on a Wicks in New York City one of the concert halls... I don't have the record at my present venue, so I can't check and see which hall it was...   Anyway, it sends shivers up my spine when I play it...   Morton Belcher fellow pipechat list member....       On Thu, 19 Apr 2001 ALamirande@aol.com wrote:   > --- In musiclassical@y..., ALamirande@a... wrote: > Marco Enrico Bossi (1861 - 1925) was, in his time, the > foremost organist in Italy, and a significant composer.   > He is best remembered for his organ > works and an organ concerto. These, too, however, are not much > performed nowadays. > True --- some of his works are published by C. F. Peters...   One work, entitled "Alleluia" is found in a number of organ = collections...       > > Bossi had the unique experience (for a composer) of dying at sea > (1925, while returning to Italy on an ocean liner from New York). > > Arthur LaMirande     Thanks, Mr. La Mirande, for taking the time to post the information about =   Mr. Bossi ---       > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: Widor: 5th symphony From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 20:11:57 EDT     --part1_4d.a6974a8.2810d8cd_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Last Sunday (Easter), M. Raymond Daveluy played the Toccata from the Widor =   5th Symphony for the Easter Postlude --- as he usually does.   That got me to thinking: after many months --- or should I say years? --- = of concentrating on the "heavy" stuff, perhaps it might be a change of pace = to go to some lighter fare. Like, say, the Widor Toccata.   So: this afternoon, I did just that. In all these years, I had never = played that old warhorse before. So, I sat down and sight-read it. Then, said I = to myself, might as well learn the rest of the piece. So, in one afternoon, = I learned the Widor 5th Symphony.   Now, I won't claim it's perfect yet. Give me another week.   The Toccata is very Lisztian. Very pianistic. (Of course, Liszt's actual =   piano pieces are very much more difficult --- as I, personally, can = testify from experience.)   Monsieur Daveluy took a rather leisurely tempo last Sunday. I prefer to = take the Toccata at a faster pace. As long as one is going to play a warhorse, =   might as well throw in some visceral excitement, say I.   I think I may include that piece as the conclusion to my recital at Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris, next January.   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_4d.a6974a8.2810d8cd_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Last Sunday (Easter), = M. Raymond Daveluy played the Toccata from the Widor <BR>5th Symphony for the Easter Postlude --- as he usually does. <BR> <BR>That got me to thinking: &nbsp;after many months --- or should I say = years? --- of <BR>concentrating on the "heavy" stuff, perhaps it might be &nbsp;a change = of pace to <BR>go to some lighter fare. &nbsp;Like, say, the Widor Toccata. <BR> <BR>So: this afternoon, I did just that. &nbsp;In all these years, I had = never played <BR>that old warhorse before. &nbsp;So, I sat down and sight-read it. = &nbsp;Then, said I to <BR>myself, might as well learn the rest of the piece. &nbsp;So, in one = afternoon, I <BR>learned the Widor 5th Symphony. <BR> <BR>Now, I won't claim it's perfect yet. &nbsp;Give me another week. <BR> <BR>The Toccata is very Lisztian. &nbsp;Very pianistic. &nbsp;(Of course, = Liszt's actual <BR>piano pieces are very much more difficult --- as I, personally, can = testify <BR>from experience.) <BR> <BR>Monsieur Daveluy took a rather leisurely tempo last Sunday. &nbsp;I = prefer to take <BR>the Toccata at a faster pace. &nbsp;As long as one is going to play a = warhorse, <BR>might as well throw in some visceral excitement, say I. <BR> <BR>I think I may include that piece as the conclusion to my recital at = Notre <BR>Dame Cathedral, Paris, next January. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_4d.a6974a8.2810d8cd_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Marco Enrico Bossi From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 20:08:52 -0500   I have two CDs recorded by my friend Massimo Nosetti of Turin, one with = some Bossi pieces, and the other being all Bossi music. Some of Massimo's CDs are available via OHS.   I find the Bossi organ works to which I have listened to be very = interesting music, of an almost Mendelssohnian quality. I was able to obtain an old score for some of them, and my favorites include his Sicilienne and Giga = (I believe the Giga may be found in the Virgil Fox book), the Landliche Szene (op.132, n. 3), and the Legend (op. 132, n. 1), as well as a Toccata something or other (memory is poor - I can almost see the name, but not quite). I'm sorry that I cannot check my names or spelling or provide = opus numbers of all, because I keep one CD at work, and therefore don't have it handy.   Having been apprised of Mr. Lamirande's facility, these pieces would probably be too tame for him, but I find a lilting singing quality to the music and recommend them. In fact, I listen to these frequently and enjoy the music very much.   Speaking of Massimo, I have just been conversing by internet with him, and he will be in the States next year in March and April, after having spent his recital time this year in Thailand, Japan and Korea, inter alia. He introduced me to music I had never heard before, music by Pierne, Bonnet = and Ritter, as well as by Bossi. I intend to have him for a return engagement at St. Agatha's. If anyone else would be interested in contacting him regarding a recital, please contact me privately and I will be happy to provide his e-mail address for you.   Glenda Sutton   ----- Original Message ----- From: <ALamirande@aol.com>   --- In musiclassical@y..., ALamirande@a... wrote: Marco Enrico Bossi (1861 - 1925) was, in his time, the foremost organist in Italy, and a significant composer. He formed a triumvirate at the turn of the century with Martucci and Sgambati. All three composers seemed to have fallen into oblivion in subsequent generations.   Bossi composed operas and much instrumental and choral music, none of = which is performed nowadays outside of Italy, and not very much there. He is = best remembered for his organ works and an organ concerto. These, too, = however, are not much performed nowadays.   etc.      
(back) Subject: Tournemire From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 20:31:36 -0500   Thanks for all the answers re Brahms' editions. However, not a soul answered my question about Tournemire. I am reprinting it and = cross-posting in the hopes someone will answer. I have heard very little Tournemire in = my life, so:   What was the Tournemire played in the NPR article about the shortage of organists yesterday (now a few days ago)? Only heard snatches and = couldn't place what it was.   Thanks,   Glenda Sutton            
(back) Subject: Todesbanden vs. Lind <g> From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 18:49:47 -0700 (PDT)   --- Robert Lind <Robert_Lind@cch.com> wrote:   > For me they are fine for beginning students, and even > then perhaps in small doses. I'm not looking for flames, even though the > weather here in the Chicago area is chilly, but am hoping some others = will > join me in feeling that these pieces are of limited value rather than > priceless gems that must be taken out of the vault and shown to the = public > at regular intervals.   I agree that many of them are too short to use for the prelude in churches = that need more than a one or 2 minute prelude, and I also pause to seriously consider your point = that (while it is a shame, indeed) for many church goers (wording carefully considered!) they = probably are irrelevant - I myself tend to shy away from these for the very reason of their = brevity and due to the fact that I am tired of people refering to the most beautiful of them - the = ornamented ones played only during Lent - as "dirges," as they are NOT - I can show them some fine = victorian examples that much more fit the bill there! But seriously, there is some truth to the = fact that even in the most sophisticated parish a high portion of the congregation might be more = comfortable with something more 20th Century....ANY music, no matter how fine the musician offering = it, would be sheer torture if one never got any relief!   On the other hand, what IS wrong with playing a group of say, three, when = they are carefully chosen as regards tempo, registration, and season? The only reason I ask = is that each year, during Advent and Lent, I play my favorites, maybe they are only a handful, but = they never get old, and one of my favorite old recordings is a 2 (LP) set by Anton Heiller playing = THE ORGELBUCHLIEN. I can validate your train of thought, but for me they are still little gems.     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Randy Terry Minister of Music, Organist & Choirmaster The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California www.stpetersrwc.org   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Auctions - buy the things you want at great prices http://auctions.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: pump organ From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 22:21:01 -0500   Any Baltimore-ian chatters out there know of a pump organ person? I have = an inquerie from a gentleman from there about recovering bellows and a = general going-over.   Reply me personally so as not to tie-up PipeChat.   Thanks, Rick dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Todesbanden vs. Lind <g> From: "Ben Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 23:22:59 -0400   Greetings:   I like to do Christ lag in Todesbanden, Jesus Christus unser Heiland and = Christ ist Erstanden as a concocted "suite". Then I do the first piece with principals at a stately = tempo, the second somewhat softly and slowly, and much bigger verse-by-verse for the last.   Another piece that's great for an Easter voluntary is Alan Hovhaness' = beautiful Dawn Hymn, Op. 138 (Peters). It starts quietly and builds to full organ and back down to = pianissimo. It's very dramatic and not too difficult to play.   I hope everyone had a joyous Easter and a good rest afterward.   Ben Baldus   Randy Terry wrote:   > --- Robert Lind <Robert_Lind@cch.com> wrote: > > > For me they are fine for beginning students, and even > > then perhaps in small doses. I'm not looking for flames, even though = the > > weather here in the Chicago area is chilly, but am hoping some others = will > > join me in feeling that these pieces are of limited value rather than > > priceless gems that must be taken out of the vault and shown to the = public > > at regular intervals. > > I agree that many of them are too short to use for the prelude in = churches that need more than a > one or 2 minute prelude, and I also pause to seriously consider your = point that (while it is a > shame, indeed) for many church goers (wording carefully considered!) = they probably are irrelevant > - I myself tend to shy away from these for the very reason of their = brevity and due to the fact > that I am tired of people refering to the most beautiful of them - the = ornamented ones played only > during Lent - as "dirges," as they are NOT - I can show them some fine = victorian examples that > much more fit the bill there! But seriously, there is some truth to the = fact that even in the most > sophisticated parish a high portion of the congregation might be more = comfortable with something > more 20th Century....ANY music, no matter how fine the musician offering = it, would be sheer > torture if one never got any relief! > > On the other hand, what IS wrong with playing a group of say, three, = when they are carefully > chosen as regards tempo, registration, and season? The only reason I ask = is that each year, during > Advent and Lent, I play my favorites, maybe they are only a handful, but = they never get old, and > one of my favorite old recordings is a 2 (LP) set by Anton Heiller = playing THE ORGELBUCHLIEN. I > can validate your train of thought, but for me they are still little = gems. > > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > Randy Terry > Minister of Music, Organist & Choirmaster > The Episcopal Church of St. Peter > Redwood City, California > www.stpetersrwc.org > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Auctions - buy the things you want at great prices > http://auctions.yahoo.com/ > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Widor: 5th Symphony From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 23:51:35 -0400   Arthur wrote:   <snip> So: this afternoon, I did just that. In all these years, I had never played that old warhorse before. So, I sat down and sight-read it. Then, said I to myself, might as well learn the rest of the piece. So, in one afternoon, I learned the Widor 5th Symphony.   Now, I won't claim it's perfect yet. Give me another week. <snip> ------------   Arthur, I'm awestruck. How very lucky you are. I'm still trying to learn bass clef over on the new teaching List. You are where we all want to be musically. Best Wishes Mike