PipeChat Digest #2040 - Saturday, April 21, 2001
 
Larkin info
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
X-post: Stories in Glass (+help!)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: X-post: Stories in Glass (+help!)
  by "Ben Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net>
Messaien and Loriod/National Shrine performance with notes
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Re: Howard Goodall
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Howard Goodall
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Howard Goodall
  by <Cpmnhartus@aol.com>
Re: Messaien and Loriod/National Shrine performance with notes
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 

(back) Subject: Larkin info From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 06:42:21 -0700 (PDT)   **From Julian's "Dream Organs" Page** -R.T.     MOLLER ORGANS OF THE ROMANTIC ZENITH   THE LARKIN ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, BUFFALO, NEW YORK, = USA MOLLER 1925           The Larkin Administration Building was designed in 1904 by Frank Lloyd = Wright (1869-1959), who wrote that it was:   ...a simple cliff of brick hermetically sealed (one of the first = air-conditioned buildings in the country) to keep the interior space clear of the poisonous gases in the smoke from the New York Central = trains that puffed along beside it.   It was built of masonry material - brick and stone; and in terms of = the straight line and flat plane the Larkin Administration Building was a genuine expression of power directly applied to = purpose, in the same sense that the ocean liner, the plane or the car is so. And it=92s only fair to say that it has had a profound = influence upon European architecture for this reason.   The building housed the administrative staff of the Larkin Soap = Manufacturing Company. Art historian Neil Levine wrote:   What Wright was trying to do... was to create a modern building = that would give the workers a sense of what he called a family gathering place. The interior... opened up into what, today, we would call an = atrium-like space which in effect does for the office building what the hearth or the fireplace did for the family home. That=92s to = say, provide a sense of focus.   The central atrium was surrounded by five stories of open balconies = and was top-lit. Staircase towers stood at each of the four corners. No distinction was made between managers and employees - it was a model = of open-plan, non-hierarchical, democratic office planning. The building housed more than 1,800 employees and had over 50,000 visitors = annually. There was an employees' lounge with a piano, and the management provided weekly lunchtime concerts. Moller was commissioned = to install a 146-stop concert organ, an apt focal point for the interior and a fitting symbol of a united community. It cost $63,000 = and stood at one end of the Atrium on the third storey.   The following stoplist is taken from Moller specification sheets found = in 1990 in the library of the Royal College of Organists, London.     GREAT 16 Double Diapason front 16 Tibia Clausa wood 8 First Diapason wood & metal 8 Second Diapason 8 Third Diapason 8 Fourth Diapason 8 Gross Flute wood 8 Gross Gedeckt wood 8 Fern Flute wood 8 Fern Celeste wood 8 Violoncello mild tone 8 Cello Celeste 8 Gemshorn 8 Gemshorn Celeste 5 1/3 Solo Flute wood & metal 4 Octave 4 Flute Harmonic 2 2/3 Twelfth 2 Fifteenth III Cornet 12.15.17 16 Double Trumpet 8 Tromba 8 Trumpet ext. 4 Clarion Chimes 25 bars Harp 8 TC; 61 bars Harp 4 ext.; 61 notes Piano 8 Piano 4 CHORUS GREAT (enclosed) 8 Choral Diapason 8 Violin 2rks 8 Cello 2rks 8 Tibia Plena wood 8 Major Tibia Clausa wood 5 1/3 Salicional Quint [given as 2 2/3ft. in the = source] 4 Suabe Flute 2 Solo Piccolo 8 Harmonic Tuba 8 Harmonic Trumpet 8 English Post Horn 8 Major Vox Humana Marimba 49 notes Marimbaphone 49 notes Orchestral Bells 49 notes Glockenspiel 49 notes GREAT DUPLEX (from Choir) 8 Concert Flute 8 Flute Celeste 8 Dulciana 4 Flute d'Amour 8 French Horn 8 Orchestral Oboe 8 Musette SWELL 16 Contra Viole 16 Bourdon wood 8 Diapason Phonon 8 Open Diapason 8 Violin Diapason 8 Hohl Flute wood 8 Gedeckt wood 8 Flauto Dolce Celeste wood [2 ranks?] 8 Viole d'Gamba 8 Viole Celeste 8 Viole d'Orchestre 8 Viole Celeste 8 Salicional 8 Salicional Celeste 5 1/3 Gemshorn 4 Principal 4 Violina 4 Rohr Flute wood 2 2/3 Flute Twelfth 2 Flageolet V Dulciana Mixture 16 Posaune 8 Cornopean 8 Oboe 4 Clarion 8 Vox Humana Tremolo Chimes Great CHORUS SWELL (enclosed) 8 Choral Diapason 8 Violin 2rks 8 Cello 2rks 8 Tibia Plena wood 8 Major Tibia Clausa wood 5 1/3 Salicional Quint 4 Suabe Flute 2 Harmonic Piccolo 8 Harmonic Tuba 8 Harmonic Trumpet 8 English Post Horn 8 Major Vox Humana Marimba 49 notes Marimbaphone 49 notes Orchestral Bells 49 notes Glockenspiel 49 notes SWELL DUPLEX (from Solo) 8 Philomela 8 Gross Gamba 8 Gross Gamba Celeste 8 Major Violin 4 Hohl Pfeife 8 French Trumpet 8 Cor Anglais CHOIR 16 Quintaton 8 English Diapason 8 Geigen Principal 8 Concert Flute wood 8 Flute Celeste wood 8 Dulciana 8 Unda Maris 8 Mezzo Violin 4 Flute d'Amour wood & metal 2 2/3 Nazard 2 Harmonic Piccolo 1 3/5 Tiercina 1 1/3 Larigot 8 Clarinet 8 French Horn 8 Orchestral Oboe 8 Musette 8 Ethereal Dulciana (5 ranks "as at West Point", each rank drawing independently. 341 pipes.) Tremolo Harp 8 Harp 4 SOLO 8 Stentorphone wood & metal = 8 Philomela wood 8 Gross Gamba 8 Gross Gamba Celeste 8 Major Violin very keen tone 4 Hohl Pfeife wood & metal 8 French Trumpet 8 Cor Anglais 16 Tuba Profunda ext. 8 Tuba Mirabilis 4 Tuba Clarion ext. Tremolo PEDAL 32 Contra Bourdon wood 32 Resultant wood 16 First Diapason wood 16 Second Diapason wood 16 Third Diapason Great 16 Violone wood 16 Contra Viole Swell 16 Tibia Clausa Great 16 Bourdon ext. 16 Lieblich Gedeckt Swell 10 2/3 Quint ext. Bourdon 8 Octave Bass ext. 8 Cello Great 8 Bass Flute ext. 32 Bombard 16 Trombone 16 Trumpet Great 16 Posaune Swell 16 Tuba Profunda Solo 8 Tromba Great 8 Tuba Mirabilis Solo 4 Clarion Solo Piano 16 Piano 8 PEDAL CHORUS (enclosed) 16 Open Diapason ext. manual Tibia Plena 16 Bourdon wood 8 Tibia Plena manual 8 Cello manual 8 Flute ext. 16 Tuba manual ext. 8 Tuba manual Expression pedals: Swell, Choir, Solo, Chorus, Register Crescendo. Piano expression and sustain.     In the Moller stoplist the piano was specified as a 8ft. 11 1/2in. = Steinway; in other sources it was noted as a 9ft. Chickering. The Choir five-rank = Ethereal Dulciana was presumably modelled after the Choir Unda Maris ranks at West Point, = which included very sharp, sharp, flat and very flat celeste ranks.   The larger chorus structures of the Larkin instrument are typical of = their time, rather majestic in a foundational kind of way. It is the reciprocal interplay = of stops among the divisions which is the main feature of interest. The resonances = include:   Chorus: Violin - Choir: Mezzo Violin - Solo: Major Violin Great: Violoncello - Chorus: Cello Great: Tibia Clausa 16 - Chorus: Tibia Plena & Major Tibia = Clausa 8 Great: Solo Flute 5 1/3 - Chorus: Solo Piccolo 2 Swell: Salicional 8 - Chorus: Salicional Quint 5 1/3 Great: Gemshorn 8 - Swell Gemshorn 5 1/3   The way in which these ranks appear from division to division, = sometimes at unexpected pitches, often standing apart from the main tonal structure, creates = in the stoplist a multi-layered quality reminiscent of many large 16th to 18th-century = European organs; a deliberately un-logical, dislocated quality as though some additional = tonal forces were waiting in the wings, as though some part of a largely unrealised = scheme had managed to gain a hold in reality. It also serves as a unifying force, a subtle = means of drawing the whole stoplist together.   There are eleven unison manual diapasons but no chorus mixture. Great = has a mass of lush 8ft. tone including three celestes. The Solo, as was often the case in = contemporary American organs, is in effect a Bombard division; the 'solo' registers = are in the Chorus division, available on Great, Swell and Pedal. There are 25 ranks of = unison manual strings, from delicate Dulcianas and Salicionals, through warm Gemshorns and = Gambas, to rich cellos, keen violins, and the Gross Gamba on Solo.   There is little manual extension in the instrument; the number of = stops is some thirty fewer than at Holy Communion Church, South Orange, NJ but there are = more than twice the number of ranks. This lavish approach meant that a tonal cornucopia = could be created, a Joseph's Coat of colour. When compared with Frank Lloyd Wright's = building it seems rather old-fashioned; the spiralling tonal columns of the West Point organ, = or the big, clean lines of the Atlantic City instrument, would accord better with the = modernist architecture. But as a tone-producer it has a leonine dignity all its own.   The Larkin Building was demolished in the 1950s; the organ was sold to = the Schlicker Organ Co. and was broken up for parts.           =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Randy Terry Minister of Music, Organist & Choirmaster The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California www.stpetersrwc.org   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Auctions - buy the things you want at great prices http://auctions.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: X-post: Stories in Glass (+help!) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 10:15:03 EDT     --part1_33.13e89dff.2812efe7_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   Below is my program for Stories In Glass (April 22). All I need to=3D20 complete it is a birthdate for Noel Goemanne.... anybody?   Stories in Glass =3D20 Holy Trinity Episcopal Church 22 April 2001 -- Four o=3DE2=3D80=3D99clock pm   Colour, Style and Decorations Bruce Cornely, organist   The Program   Prelude and Fugue in d-minor . . . Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)   from Six Small Preludes . . . Hermann Schroeder (1904-1984) II. Trio =3D20 V. Fugue VI Fanfare & Fugue =3D20   from The First Organ Book . . . Jean-Francois Dandrieu (1682-1738) Duo Trio Basse et dessus de Trompette =3D20     Chromatic Fugue in d-minor . . . Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706)   Fughetta in D-major (from Opus 123a) . . . Josef Rheinberger = (1839-190=3D 1)     Adagio in a-minor . . . Johann Sebastian Bach (from Toccata, Adagio & Fugue in C)   Chant sans Paroles . . . Charles Callahan (b. 1951)   Aria . . . Flor Peeters (1903-1986)   Cantilena (from Sonata No. #) . . . Josef Rheinberger=3D20   Interlude (from Three Characteristic Pieces) . . . Jean = Langlais=3D20 (1907-1991)     Rejoice . . . Noel Goemanne     + + +     Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com =3D20 with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_33.13e89dff.2812efe7_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>Below is my program = for S=3D tories In Glass (April 22). &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;All I need to=3D20 <BR>complete it is a birthdate for Noel Goemanne.... anybody? <BR> <BR>Stories in Glass &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> Holy Trinity Episcopal Church <BR>22 April 2001 &nbsp;&nbsp;-- &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Four = o=3DE2=3D80=3D99cloc=3D k pm <BR> <BR>Colour, Style and Decorations <BR>Bruce Cornely, organist <BR> <BR>The Program <BR> <BR>Prelude and Fugue in d-minor &nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;Johann = Sebast=3D ian Bach (1685-1750) <BR> <BR>from Six Small Preludes . &nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;Hermann Schroeder = (1904-=3D 1984) <BR>II. &nbsp;Trio &nbsp; <BR>V. Fugue <BR>VI Fanfare &amp; Fugue &nbsp; <BR> <BR>from The First Organ Book &nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;Jean-Francois = Da=3D ndrieu (1682-1738) <BR>Duo <BR>Trio <BR>Basse et dessus de Trompette &nbsp; <BR> <BR> <BR>Chromatic Fugue in d-minor &nbsp;&nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Joh=3D ann Pachelbel (1653-1706) <BR> <BR>Fughetta in D-major (from Opus 123a) &nbsp;&nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;. = &nbsp=3D ;&nbsp;Josef Rheinberger (1839-1901) <BR> <BR> <BR>Adagio in a-minor &nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;&nbsp;Johann Sebastian = B=3D ach <BR>(from Toccata, Adagio &amp; Fugue in C) <BR> <BR>Chant sans Paroles &nbsp;&nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;&nbsp;Charles = Cal=3D lahan &nbsp;(b. 1951) <BR> <BR>Aria &nbsp;&nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;&nbsp;Flor Peeters = (1903-1986) <BR> <BR>Cantilena &nbsp;(from Sonata No. #) &nbsp;&nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;. = &nbsp;=3D &nbsp;Josef Rheinberger=3D20 <BR> <BR>Interlude (from Three Characteristic Pieces) &nbsp;&nbsp;. &nbsp;. = &nbsp=3D ;. &nbsp;&nbsp;Jean Langlais=3D20 <BR>(1907-1991) <BR> <BR> <BR>Rejoice &nbsp;&nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;. &nbsp;&nbsp;Noel Goemanne <BR> <BR> <BR>+ &nbsp;+ &nbsp;+ <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/<=3D /FONT></HTML>   --part1_33.13e89dff.2812efe7_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: X-post: Stories in Glass (+help!) From: "Ben Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 10:17:13 -0400   Noel Goemanne-10 Dec 1926-in West Flanders, Belgium.   Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > Below is my program for Stories In Glass (April 22). All I need to > complete it is a birthdate for Noel Goemanne.... anybody? > > Stories in Glass > Holy Trinity Episcopal Church > 22 April 2001 -- Four o=E2=80=99clock pm > > Colour, Style and Decorations > Bruce Cornely, organist > > The Program > > Prelude and Fugue in d-minor . . . Johann Sebastian Bach > (1685-1750) > > from Six Small Preludes . . . Hermann Schroeder (1904-1984) > II. Trio > V. Fugue > VI Fanfare & Fugue > > from The First Organ Book . . . Jean-Francois Dandrieu (1682-1738) > > Duo > Trio > Basse et dessus de Trompette > > > Chromatic Fugue in d-minor . . . Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706) > > Fughetta in D-major (from Opus 123a) . . . Josef Rheinberger > (1839-1901) > > > Adagio in a-minor . . . Johann Sebastian Bach > (from Toccata, Adagio & Fugue in C) > > Chant sans Paroles . . . Charles Callahan (b. 1951) > > Aria . . . Flor Peeters (1903-1986) > > Cantilena (from Sonata No. #) . . . Josef Rheinberger > > Interlude (from Three Characteristic Pieces) . . . Jean Langlais > > (1907-1991) > > > Rejoice . . . Noel Goemanne > > > + + + > > > Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi > Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/    
(back) Subject: Messaien and Loriod/National Shrine performance with notes From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 11:22:31 EDT     --part1_75.1382128c.2812ffb7_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   The piano recital by Olivier Messaien to which I previously referred was actually a duo-recital, with M. Messaien and his wife Yvonne Loriod as pianists, = playing his works for the piano. That occurred at Hunter College in New York. I = believe they also took this program to several other U.S. cities. As I recall, they = used the score when playing together; but Mme Loriod played from memory, when playing = alone.   A few days before, Messaien gave a historic performance on the organ of = the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, DC: the world premiere of his "Meditations sur le Mystere da la Sainte Trinite' ", = before a packed house. (People had come from all over the country, evidently, to = hear this unique performance.) That was on Monday, March 20, 1972.   For this occasion, Messaien wrote detailed program notes --- eight pages = of them! I still have that program booklet in my library, after all these years. I =   was glad he had written them, because without the printed notes, I would = have been lost! All sat in reverence of the great man, as he performed, but = how many actually understood what they were hearing? I suspect rather few. Messaien's notes discussed communicable language and his effort to create = an actual musical language --- and is far too lengthy to quote here. Well, = his musical language was about as easy to understand as Sanskrit! However, = when I heard the work again a few years later in New York (performed by Jon Gillock), I found that it wasn't really necessary to refer to the notes, although I had brought them along. So Messaien's musical language can = become more accessible upon repeated hearings. Still, I don't think that this = music will ever have wide appeal to the general concertgoer. Any more than late =   Arnold Schoenberg has had.   A note about the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception: this is = the largest Catholic church in the United States. From the outside, it is a stunning edifice, with a brilliantly decorated dome and a high campanile (which, oddly, resembles the minaret of a Muslim mosque!). Inside, the effect (to me, anyway) is ponderous. There is a stunning mosaic of a stern Christ in Majesty in the apse. = Perhaps if the rest of the walls and ceiling were covered by mosaics (as at Westminster Cathedral, London), the effect would be more successful; but = who knows if or when that will ever happen?   The two organs (gallery and sanctuary) were built by Moller in the early 1960s, a gift from Cardinal Spellman of New York. (That same Cardinal who =   didn't want organ concerts in his own cathedral!) They are rather typical =   for Moller organs of that period, other than (in the case of the gallery organ) being larger. In other words, not in the same league as that organ = in Montreal about which I've been known to enthuse from time to time.   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_75.1382128c.2812ffb7_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>The piano recital by = Olivier Messaien to which I previously referred was <BR>actually a <BR>duo-recital, with M. Messaien and his wife Yvonne Loriod as pianists, = playing <BR>his <BR>works for the piano. &nbsp;That occurred at Hunter College in New = York. &nbsp;I believe <BR>they <BR>also took this program to several other U.S. cities. &nbsp;As I = recall, they used <BR>the score <BR>when playing together; but Mme Loriod played from memory, when playing = alone. <BR> <BR>A few days before, Messaien gave a historic performance on the organ = of the <BR>National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, DC: the = world <BR>premiere of his "Meditations sur le Mystere da la Sainte Trinite' ", = before a <BR>packed house. &nbsp;(People had come from all over the country, = evidently, to hear <BR>this unique <BR>performance.) &nbsp;That was on Monday, March 20, 1972. <BR> <BR>For this occasion, Messaien wrote detailed program notes --- eight = pages of <BR>them! <BR>I still have that program booklet in my library, after all these = years. &nbsp;I <BR>was glad he had written them, because without the printed notes, I = would have <BR>been lost! &nbsp;&nbsp;All sat in reverence of the great man, as he = performed, but how <BR>many actually understood what they were hearing? &nbsp;I suspect = rather few. &nbsp; <BR>Messaien's notes discussed communicable language and his effort to = create an <BR>actual musical language --- and is far too lengthy to quote here. = &nbsp;Well, his <BR>musical language was about as easy to understand as Sanskrit! = &nbsp;However, when <BR>I heard the work again a few years later in New York (performed by Jon =   <BR>Gillock), &nbsp;I found that it wasn't really necessary to refer to = the notes, <BR>although I had brought them along. &nbsp;So Messaien's musical = language can become <BR>more accessible upon repeated hearings. &nbsp;Still, I don't think = that this music <BR>will ever have wide appeal to the general concertgoer. &nbsp;Any more = than late <BR>Arnold Schoenberg has had. <BR> <BR>A note about the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception: = &nbsp;this is the <BR>largest Catholic church in the United States. &nbsp;From the outside, = it is a <BR>stunning edifice, with a brilliantly decorated dome and a high = campanile <BR>(which, oddly, resembles the minaret of a Muslim mosque!). = &nbsp;Inside, the <BR>effect (to me, anyway) is ponderous. <BR>There is a stunning mosaic of a stern Christ in Majesty in the apse. = &nbsp;Perhaps <BR>if the rest of the walls and ceiling were covered by mosaics (as at <BR>Westminster Cathedral, London), the effect would be more successful; = but who <BR>knows if or when that will ever happen? &nbsp; <BR> <BR>The two organs (gallery and sanctuary) were built by Moller in the = early <BR>1960s, a gift from Cardinal Spellman of New York. &nbsp;(That same = Cardinal who <BR>didn't want organ concerts in his own cathedral!) &nbsp;They are = rather typical <BR>for Moller organs of that period, other than (in the case of the = gallery <BR>organ) being larger. &nbsp;In other words, not in the same league as = that organ in <BR>Montreal about which I've been known to enthuse from time to time. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_75.1382128c.2812ffb7_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Howard Goodall From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 18:09:20 +0100   Yes, this is the same Howard Goodall... there has also been a third = series called Howard Goodall's Big Bangs here in the UK all about landmark things in music history. I have a CD of many of his choral works called (imaginatively enough) Howard Goodall Choral Works. Mr Bean theme is = called 'Ecce Homo'. The translation of the latin text is "Behold! The man who is = a bean. Farewell O man who is a bean."!! He has also written a lovely setting of Psalm 23 for a BBC TV comedy called the Vicar of Dibley... has = it made it around the world? He has written themes for lots of other UK comedies too... Red Dwarf? 2point4 Children? Thin Blue line? Blackadder? Thinking about it, he probably wrote the theme to the Organ programme... = he certainly did for the Big Bang series (I have that on a separate CD = too...)   Hope this info in useful to you!   Steve Barker Organist and Choirmaster St Stephens Canterbury UK     ----- Original Message ----- From: "edward a mc callum" <edmack2@juno.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, April 21, 2001 3:56 AM Subject: Re: Howard Goodall mystery piece     > is this the same howard goodall who did the theme for mr.bean series? if > so ---i would like to know the name > of the piece. it is a melody that i think of often, and would like to = get > the music. > > ed mc callum, melbourne, florida > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Howard Goodall From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 13:55:36 -0400   Those interested in learning more about Howard Goodall may wish to visit his web site: http://www.howardgoodall.co.uk/   Has anyone tried out his choral music? Looks intriguing.   One of the more remarkable things about him, in my view, is that he looks alarmingly like Bill Clinton!   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu  
(back) Subject: Re: Howard Goodall From: <Cpmnhartus@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 15:02:04 EDT   21 April 2001   Howard Goodall's Psalm 23, the Vicar of Dibley opening theme music, is a splendid setting. It opens with a beautiful melody sung by a solo soprano, =   then repeated by the full choir, followed by a contrasting middle section = of rhythmic and melodic interest. Choirs and congregations love it.   This is only one of many interesting choral works on the CD called Howard Goodall's Choral Works. The CD is well worth owning.   George Bayley Senior U. S. Consultant Copeman Hart America   1-800-773-4858 www.copemanhart.co.uk    
(back) Subject: Re: Messaien and Loriod/National Shrine performance with notes From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 13:53:17 -0700   At 11:22 AM 4/21/2001 -0400, you wrote: >The two organs (gallery and sanctuary) were built by Moller in the early >1960s, a gift from Cardinal Spellman of New York. (That same Cardinal who >didn't want organ concerts in his own cathedral!) They are rather typical >for Moller organs of that period, other than (in the case of the gallery >organ) being larger.<snip>   I've heard this organ, and agree that the organs yield a rather=20 "off-the-shelf" M=F8ller sound. Spellman (or most all other catholic=20 honchos) obviously didn't (don't) care much for organs in general in the=20 US, hence this one wasn't anything unique. It's a pretty standard Ernest=20 White design, with the trademark reeds by Adolph Zajic. Zajic's=20 interesting (sometimes overbearing) reed stops were in contrast to M=F8ller'= s=20 too-thin, too-bright flue work at the time. For a very close tonal=20 comparison, think the 1958 M=F8ller at St. George's, NYC.   DeserTBoB