PipeChat Digest #2041 - Saturday, April 21, 2001
 
Goodall Psalm 23
  by <Doppelflote8@aol.com>
St. George's Moller, New York/St. Paul the Apostle
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Organ history and design- two questions
  by <AMADPoet@aol.com>
Professional Musicians don't need to practice...
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Organ history and design- two questions
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...
  by "Ben Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net>
Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...??Hello!
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: St. George's Moller, New York/St. Paul the Apostle
  by "edward a mc callum" <edmack2@juno.com>
Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...
  by "Marilyn Oakes" <oakesmarilyn@yahoo.com>
Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...??Hello!
  by "Marilyn Oakes" <oakesmarilyn@yahoo.com>
Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Goodall Psalm 23 From: <Doppelflote8@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 20:17:52 EDT     --part1_a1.146eb260.28137d30_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Those interested in learning more about Howard Goodall may wish to visit his web site: http://www.howardgoodall.co.uk/   Has anyone tried out his choral music? Looks intriguing.   One of the more remarkable things about him, in my view, is that he looks alarmingly like Bill Clinton!   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu   Randy....   The Chancel Choir is performing the Goodall Psalm 23 on May 6th. Should = be interesting as they have yet to get thru a rehearsal of it without a = chuckle about the "Britcom".   Alan E. Carrick Organist and Director of Music First Church Congregational Methuen MA     --part1_a1.146eb260.28137d30_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial Black" LANG=3D"0">Those = interested in learning more about Howard Goodall may wish to <BR>visit his web site: &nbsp;http://www.howardgoodall.co.uk/ <BR> <BR>Has anyone tried out his choral music? &nbsp;Looks intriguing. <BR> <BR>One of the more remarkable things about him, in my view, is that he <BR>looks alarmingly like Bill Clinton! <BR> <BR>Randy Runyon <BR>organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati <BR>runyonr@muohio.edu <BR> <BR>Randy.... <BR><B> <BR>T</B>he Chancel Choir is performing the Goodall Psalm 23 on May 6th. = &nbsp;Should be <BR>interesting as they have yet to get thru a rehearsal of it without a = chuckle <BR>about the "Britcom". <BR> <BR>Alan E. Carrick <BR>Organist and Director of Music <BR>First Church Congregational <BR>Methuen MA <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_a1.146eb260.28137d30_boundary--  
(back) Subject: St. George's Moller, New York/St. Paul the Apostle From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 20:56:46 EDT     --part1_cb.10345d7f.2813864e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Bob Scarborough mentions the 1958 Moller at St. George's Episcopal Church, =   Stuyvesant Square, New York City.   I am very familiar with that instrument, having used it for several months = in 1999 for practice purposes (while preparing for my recital that summer at l'Oratoire St. Joseph, Montreal).   It's an interesting instrument, but not especially well designed or = voiced. No comparison to the smaller but much superior 1938 (Whitelegg) Moller at Holy Name of Jesus uptown. I heard E. Power Biggs in recital at St. = George's back in the 60s, when he played to a packed house. The once-wealthy = church has fallen on hard times in recent years, evidently, and is no longer = packed. (It seems to have a considerable gay clientele nowadays, including the entire staff.)   It's a pity that Mr. Whitelegg died prematurely. (I'm told, on = trustworthy authority, that he was overly fond of the bottle.) Moller just seemed to = go downhill after that. One successful instrument of their later years of = which I am aware is the 1965 instrument in the Church of St. Paul the Apostle, = near Lincoln Center in New York City. I heard Michael Schneider and Andre = Marchal perform on this organ, to great effect. The highpoint of the Marchal = recital was his improvisation on a Gregorian theme, submitted to him on the spot = by the then music director of the church, Father Foley. The improvisation was =   stunning. How a person who is totally blind can achieve these results --- = or even perform at all, especially on such a complex instrument as the organ = --- is beyond my understanding. The highpoint of the Schneider recital was = his performance of the Ciacona by Karl Ho"ller, who had dedicated the work to Schneider. I promptly went out and bought the score. (Evidently, I was = the only one in attendance who did, because I haven't heard of any American organists performing this work, since then --- and that was over 30 years ago!) The organ, incidentally, was a bequest to the church. It fell into =   serious disrepair in the 90s, and they have been conducting a campaign to raise funds for its restoration.   One quirk of this organ, though, is that there is a fraction of a second delay between the time the organist depresses the key and the time the = sound emits from the corresponding pipe. This makes is awkward to play. And it =   becomes painfully obvious when the organ is accompanying a choir, and the organ sound is lagging a fraction of a second behind the choral sounds.   Father Foley, for many years, was director of the Paulist Choristers, a celebrated all-male choir of men and boys --- one of several in New York Catholic churches, in the old days. I remember hearing them back in = 1962, when I was new in New York and the Mass was still in Latin. It made a tremendous impression on me. Alas, after the changes of 1964, the choir = was eventually disbanded --- and there was even serious consideration given to =   tearing down the church altogether: it had lost much of its once immense congregation when the entire Lincoln neighborhood was razed to make way = for Lincoln Center. Father Foley died, of a broken heart, it is said., and is =   buried in the crypt. (Eventually, the church was saved, partly through = the intervention of Cardinal Cooke of New York, and partly through the sale of =   adjacent church-owned property. Today, high-rises tower over the church, dwarfing the huge edifice which once dominated the neighborhood.)   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_cb.10345d7f.2813864e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Bob Scarborough = mentions the 1958 Moller at St. George's Episcopal Church, <BR>Stuyvesant Square, New York City. <BR> <BR>I am very familiar with that instrument, having used it for several = months in <BR>1999 for practice purposes (while preparing for my recital that summer at <BR>l'Oratoire St. Joseph, Montreal). <BR> <BR>It's an interesting instrument, but not especially well designed or = voiced. &nbsp; <BR>No comparison to the smaller but much superior 1938 (Whitelegg) Moller = at <BR>Holy Name of Jesus uptown. &nbsp;I heard E. Power Biggs in recital at = St. George's <BR>back in the 60s, when he played to a packed house. &nbsp;The = once-wealthy church <BR>has fallen on hard times in recent years, evidently, and is no longer = packed. <BR>&nbsp;(It seems to have a considerable gay clientele nowadays, = including the <BR>entire staff.) <BR> <BR>It's a pity that Mr. Whitelegg died prematurely. &nbsp;(I'm told, on = trustworthy <BR>authority, that he was overly fond of the bottle.) &nbsp;Moller just = seemed to go <BR>downhill after that. &nbsp;One successful instrument of their later = years of which <BR>I am aware is the 1965 instrument in the Church of St. Paul the = Apostle, near <BR>Lincoln Center in New York City. &nbsp;I heard Michael Schneider and = Andre Marchal <BR>perform on this organ, to great effect. &nbsp;The highpoint of the = Marchal recital <BR>was his improvisation on a Gregorian theme, submitted to him on the = spot by <BR>the then music director of the church, Father Foley. The improvisation = was <BR>stunning. &nbsp;How a person who is totally blind can achieve these = results --- or <BR>even perform at all, especially on such a complex instrument as the = organ --- <BR>is beyond my understanding. &nbsp;The highpoint of the Schneider = recital was his <BR>performance of the Ciacona by Karl Ho"ller, who had dedicated the work = to <BR>Schneider. &nbsp;I promptly went out and bought the score. = &nbsp;(Evidently, I was the <BR>only one in attendance who did, because I haven't heard of any = American <BR>organists performing this work, since then --- and that was over 30 = years <BR>ago!) &nbsp;The organ, incidentally, was a bequest to the church. = &nbsp;It fell into <BR>serious disrepair in the 90s, and they have been conducting a campaign = to <BR>raise funds for its restoration. <BR> <BR>One quirk of this organ, though, is that there is a fraction of a = second <BR>delay between the time the organist depresses the key and the time the = sound <BR>emits from the corresponding pipe. &nbsp;This makes is awkward to = play. &nbsp;And it <BR>becomes painfully obvious when the organ is accompanying a choir, and = the <BR>organ sound is lagging a fraction of a second behind the choral = sounds. <BR> <BR>Father Foley, for many years, was director of the Paulist Choristers, = a <BR>celebrated all-male choir of men and boys --- one of several in New = York <BR>Catholic churches, in the old days. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I remember = hearing them back in 1962, <BR>when I was new in New York and the Mass was still in Latin. &nbsp;It = made a <BR>tremendous impression on me. &nbsp;Alas, after the changes of 1964, = the choir was <BR>eventually disbanded --- and there was even serious consideration = given to <BR>tearing down the church altogether: it had lost much of its once = immense <BR>congregation when the entire Lincoln neighborhood was razed to make = way for <BR>Lincoln Center. &nbsp;Father Foley died, of a broken heart, it is = said., and is <BR>buried in the crypt. &nbsp;&nbsp;(Eventually, the church was saved, = partly through the <BR>intervention of Cardinal Cooke of New York, and partly through the = sale of <BR>adjacent church-owned property. &nbsp;Today, high-rises tower over the = church, <BR>dwarfing the huge edifice which once dominated the neighborhood.) <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_cb.10345d7f.2813864e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Organ history and design- two questions From: <AMADPoet@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 21:55:59 EDT   Hi everyone-   I'm doing some research on the history/evolution of the organ and was wondering if any drawings or reproductions of the Hydraulis exist. Any additional info y'all might have on this instrument would be welcome- I'm still trying to imagine in my head (and ears, for that matter) how the = thing worked.   Also- and I'm not quite sure how to ask this question- with regards to = say, reed pipes and actual reed instruments, is similarity in construction what =   causes the sound to be similar, or did some organ builder years ago experiment until he found a way of re-creating the sound of various instruments? Do pipes have the same components as the instruments they are =   representing? I hope I'm communicating what I'm trying to ask, I've been reading so much info in the past few days my thoughts are jumbled!   Humbly, Mandy  
(back) Subject: Professional Musicians don't need to practice... From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 22:29:41 EDT   I was faced with a the very statement (from a non musical/non church = member) "Well, professional musicians don't need to practice..." earlier today. = My response was, "EXCUSE ME ... it's quite the opposite..." I wonder how = many of our parishioners think the same way? How can people be so dumb? This = may be the very reason why our salaries are so low in general... Any one care = to share their opinions/experiences?   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ history and design- two questions From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 22:38:21 EDT   Hi Mandy:   The questions you ask about probably can be answered all in one book! It's called "THE ORGAN" by Peter Williams and Barbara Owen. It's part of the New Glove Musical Instrument Series published by W.W. Norton & Co. New York And London ISBN 0-393-30516-3   Organ Historical Society may have this book for sale on-line. Give them a try anyway, also Brenda Durden, The Frantic Organist Shop. bdurden@ix.netcom.com http://ohscatalog.org/   All the best in your search,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice... From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 22:37:44 -0400   >I was faced with a the very statement (from a non musical/non church = member) >"Well, professional musicians don't need to practice..." earlier today. = My >response was, "EXCUSE ME ... it's quite the opposite..." I wonder how = many >of our parishioners think the same way? How can people be so dumb? This = may >be the very reason why our salaries are so low in general... Any one = care to >share their opinions/experiences? > >John >   And why is it that choir directors tend to get more money than organists when _they_ don't have to spend hours practicing?   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu  
(back) Subject: Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice... From: "Ben Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 22:44:26 -0400   Dear PipeChatters:   This is written in response to DRAWKNOB's statement.   Lots of people think that church musicians do what they do for "fun" and = some others as a free offering to God. Therefore, from this point-of-view, = outside services (like weddings and funerals) should be pro bono, and services of = the church should be compensated in a minimal and unjust manner. That's why = many of us have gone to other lines of work, and are no longer available to do = musical work in parishes. Just try to find a competent substitute = organist-choirmaster. Why would one pay $30K per year to a good University to get a graduate = degree in something that MIGHT pay $10K per year?   In a slightly cynical, but otherwise cheerful mood,   Ben Baldus    
(back) Subject: Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...??Hello! From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 22:52:41 EDT   Hi John:   In answer to this person's "Well, professional musicians don't need to practice..." You might want to say, Do you mean a professional chef doesn't have to practice? Does that imply that I could become a professional chef = overnight or that you could become a professional musician with three easy lessons? Depending on how friendly you are with this person, sit him down to the organ and ask him to find middle C on any keyboard. Most people can't! Ask him if he knows without hearing them what each stop on the organ = sounds like. Put down a stop yourself and tell him he has one chance out of four or three etc. to touch the right keyboard. I think that will put things in =   proper perspective. Then reask his Question, and let him answer it.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: St. George's Moller, New York/St. Paul the Apostle From: "edward a mc callum" <edmack2@juno.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 23:01:37 -0400   your comments regarding the blind organist--reminds of when as a very young choirboy, at the holy name church in west roxbury (boston) we were rehearsing for the consecration of our pastor--father ryan--to be bishop of burlington vermont. frank mahler was the organist and choir director. we worked on the TE DEUM-- i believe it was by palestrina for weeks. we went to the rehearsal (final) at the cathedral of the holy cross in the city. there i witnessed the performance of a man who if i am not mistaken--was theodore (ted) marea. he was blind if my memory serves me correctly and today at age 71 i still remember that glorious time and that very talented man. our whole life was involved with that church and the great music that was made there. frank mahler was great, and he also had an assistant--margeret lally, who was a fine organist. gosh--i was 10 or 11 at that time--seems like yesterday--! my dad was a fine tenor also and always sang the 6th word of dubois famous 7 last words every easter season. my brothers and i were all boy sopranos. my youngest son--a talented organist and pianist, lost his eyesight in a bicycle accident at age 14 and has mastered my B-3 and many other organs and keyboards since. he never ceases to amaze me and everyone else. excuse me if i spelled ted mareas' name incorrectly. enough for now.   ed mc callum melbourne florida  
(back) Subject: Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice... From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 22:04:45 -0500   In many churches, organists are taken for granted and left to themselves.   Rick    
(back) Subject: Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice... From: "Marilyn Oakes" <oakesmarilyn@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 20:11:19 -0700 (PDT)   Randy - New to the ListServ, but not to the profession. I've said for years that organists make it look too easy. If we stripped to shorts and sweated a lot (like professional athletes), then we might get more respect.<g> Don't get me wrong - I love sporting events, but nobody believes Michael Jordan quit practicing after college.   I don't think the problem is limited to musicians, however. The population, in general, doesn't understand the hours of work that excellence in any profession requires. A recent example:   I quit music, went back to school, got another degree, and have made my living as a professional rehabilitation counselor for the last 20 years. One of the things I do as a rehab counselor is manage medical cases. I've worked on zillion dollar litigated cases, formally lectured to doctors, lawyers and psychologists at seminars and grand rounds, educated myself on the legal ins and outs of disability issues, and have given copious advice to attorneys how to do their jobs better when handling litigated disability cases. When I announced that I was offering medical case management services to lawyers, a legal clerk (high school graduate but no more), remarked to me that she'd appreciate it if I would give her "a few tips" (free, naturally) on how to better manage her cases like I manage mine. I muttered something polite and told my husband later that I make this job look entirely too easy. 20 years' professional experience, a master's degree, a professional license, and multiple national certifications, and a legal clerk thinks I can turn her into me with a "few tips."   Rampaging ignorance is everywhere. We don't live in a society that values or rewards excellence in the rank-and-file person.   I don't have any answers for the low wages. However, if I were in a music job, then I would make my practicing VERY visible, so that everyone knew how much face time I was spending. I might also tally my hours and reduce it to an hourly wage, which might shame the Powers That Be into raises. Unfortunately, we pay (or don't pay) for what we value, and our society does not value either truth or beauty.   I've also said for years that every church musician would benefit from a counseling degree. Your job duties require significant behavioral management in a day's time, more than many professional counselors, whether you know it or not. Some church musicians have excellent people management skills; others create their own problems. Me, personally, I ran like hell. <g>   Marilyn T. Oakes, CRC, LPC, CLPC Certified Pain Practitioner (and sometimes organist)       --- Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote: > >I was faced with a the very statement (from a non > musical/non church member) > >"Well, professional musicians don't need to > practice..." earlier today. My > >response was, "EXCUSE ME ... it's quite the > opposite..." I wonder how many > >of our parishioners think the same way? How can > people be so dumb? This may > >be the very reason why our salaries are so low in > general... Any one care to > >share their opinions/experiences? > > > >John > > > > And why is it that choir directors tend to get more > money than > organists when _they_ don't have to spend hours > practicing? > > Randy Runyon > organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati > runyonr@muohio.edu > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...??Hello! From: "Marilyn Oakes" <oakesmarilyn@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 20:21:33 -0700 (PDT)   Ron - No offense intended, but if you put a person on the spot like that, you'll make an enemy for life, no matter how friendly they were formerly.   When someone says really ignorant things like that, a better strategy is something like, "Oh, boy, I wish that were true! That's a very common misunderstanding and you shouldn't feel bad, because you're not the first person I've heard say that. I'm really flattered that you think I make it look so easy. The real truth is that people in my line of work spend XX hours weekly practicing, if they're any good at all. I wouldn't DARE offer something to God that wasn't my best effort. This just takes a TON of time. Last week, alone, I spent XX hours, and during really business times like Lent, Easter, Advent and Christmas, I might spend XX hours."   ... or whatever suits your personal style.. The rules are to be unfailingly polite and respectful, allow them to save face, while teaching them what you need for them to know to appreciate the job you're doing. The next time you see them, make a point to speak, ask about the family, etc. If they like you, then they're more likely to support your work, even if they don't understand the technicalities.   NEVER, EVER make an enemy in a church setting, even if you end up with teeth marks in your tongue.They might be a high dollar donor with the undivided attention of the rector. Or a member of your next salary/job review committee.   Marilyn T. Oakes, CRC, LPC, CLCP Certified Pain Practitioner         --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Hi John: > > In answer to this person's "Well, professional > musicians don't need to > practice..." > You might want to say, Do you mean a professional > chef doesn't have to > practice? Does that imply that I could become a > professional chef overnight > or that you could become a professional musician > with three easy lessons? > Depending on how friendly you are with this person, > sit him down to the > organ and ask him to find middle C on any keyboard. > Most people can't! > Ask him if he knows without hearing them what each > stop on the organ sounds > like. Put down a stop yourself and tell him he has > one chance out of four > or three etc. to touch the right keyboard. I think > that will put things in > proper > perspective. Then reask his Question, and let him > answer it. > > Ron Severin > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice... From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 20:36:09 -0700   At 10:29 PM 4/21/2001 -0400, you wrote: >"Well, professional musicians don't need to practice..." earlier today. = My >response was, "EXCUSE ME ... it's quite the opposite..." I wonder how = many >of our parishioners think the same way? How can people be so dumb?<snip>   Easy. They have no musical education of any worth themselves, therefore = do not appreciate musical performance properly. Indeed, many unmusical = people seem to think that music just sort of "happens".   >This may be the very reason why our salaries are so low in general... = <snip>   Good point!   dB    
(back) Subject: Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice... From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2001 23:58:17 EDT     --part1_a4.12f392e5.2813b0d9_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 4/21/01 7:30:36 PM Pacific Daylight Time, = DRAWKNOB@aol.com writes:     > I was faced with a the very statement (from a non musical/non church = member) > "Well, professional musicians don't need to practice..." earlier today. = My > response was, "EXCUSE ME ... it's quite the opposite..." I wonder how = many > of our parishioners think the same way? How can people be so dumb? = This > may > be the very reason why our salaries are so low in general... Any one = care > to > share their opinions/experiences? > This is also complicated by the recurrent practice of handing organists = music and having it sightread for them, very often without complaint. Have we brought it on ourselves by being to nice? Too few people see or hear us practicing. Because most of us are part-time, our practicing is done outside of "business hours" . One thing I always did was to practice = at times when the altar guild was working, and I was doing real practicing on =   quiet stops, working slowly. It helped. Altar guild ladies talk, ya = know!! ;-)     Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_a4.12f392e5.2813b0d9_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 4/21/01 7:30:36 PM Pacific Daylight Time, DRAWKNOB@aol.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I was faced with a = the very statement (from a non musical/non church member) <BR>"Well, professional musicians don't need to practice..." earlier = today. &nbsp;My <BR>response was, "EXCUSE ME ... it's quite the opposite..." &nbsp;I = wonder how many <BR>of our parishioners think the same way? &nbsp;How can people be so = dumb? &nbsp;This <BR>may <BR>be the very reason why our salaries are so low in general... &nbsp;Any = one care <BR>to <BR>share their opinions/experiences? <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">This is also complicated by the recurrent = practice of handing organists music <BR>and having it sightread for them, very often without complaint. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Have we <BR>brought it on ourselves by being to nice? &nbsp;&nbsp;Too few people = see or hear us <BR>practicing. &nbsp;&nbsp;Because most of us are part-time, our = practicing is done <BR>outside of "business hours" . &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;One thing I = always did was to practice at <BR>times when the altar guild was working, and I was doing real = practicing on <BR>quiet stops, working slowly. &nbsp;It helped. &nbsp;&nbsp;Altar guild = ladies talk, ya know!! <BR>&nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_a4.12f392e5.2813b0d9_boundary--