PipeChat Digest #2047 - Monday, April 23, 2001
 
the gallery organs at St. Thomas NYC, and a Smoky Mary's question
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Medinah Temple Austin (crossposted)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: St. Thomas
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Medinah Temple Austin (crossposted)
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: St. Thomas
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...
  by <JamesM8336@aol.com>
Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice...
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Practice, and keeping the organ locked
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Noehren's invention
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Glorious sounds, swiveling heads, etc.
  by <ALamirande@aol.com>
Re: Noehren's invention
  by "stan e yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: the gallery organs at St. Thomas NYC, and a Smoky Mary's question
  by "stan e yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: Noehren's invention
  by "Jeffrey Trimble" <jtrimble@cc.ysu.edu>
 

(back) Subject: the gallery organs at St. Thomas NYC, and a Smoky Mary's question From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 08:28:56 -0700     --------------D6D15817265ADED340F27C62 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   The Adams instrument was for sale for a very long time ... I seem to remember that it was finally broken up. I too had heard that the problems were primarily mechanical, rather than tonal, although a French baroque more-or-less copy would have had limited usefulness in an Anglican church, I'd think. I vaguely recall it being used for a performance of the Vierne Mass for two organs, but not much else.   That the gallery was previously "sans orgue" is not totally accurate ... there had been an antiphonal/echo previously, at least since the time of the GDH rebuild in the '50s, including (if memory serves) some kind of big solo reed ... or maybe it was REMOVED in the GDH rebuild ... I don't recall seeing stop-knobs for it when I played the organ sometime in the late '50s / early '60s AFTER the rebuild, but it could have been removed in preparation for the Adams by then, or there could have been another rebuild in the interim. At any rate, there had been SOMETHING back there at SOME time (grin), but not (I think) a separate console.   Another NYC curiosity ... does anyone know the history of the rather large chancel swallow's nest organ at Smoky Mary's? Was there ever a separate console, or was it only playable from the Jardine in the back? I understand there are plans to revive it (the Jardine chest is still there, but not the pipes) ... were the Jardine pipes incorporated into the E.M. Skinner? Did Smoky Mary's have a chancel (ritual?) choir at one time? I know there are two consoles NOW, with preparations for a Chancel division.   Cheers,   Bud   Hugh Drogemuller wrote:   > At 07:47 23/04/2001 -0400, Arthur wrote: > >> That's the church where, in the 60s, they spent a >> huge of money to install a "baroque" pipe organ in the rear organ >> loft >> (previously sans orgue). It turned out to be such a flop that >> eventually >> they disposed of it. > > > (SNIP) > I was under the impression that the rear gallery instrument was very > French in style and that the quality of sound was excellent. The > problems were in the action and chests? > > HD   --------------D6D15817265ADED340F27C62 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> The Adams instrument was for sale for a very long time ... I seem to = remember that it was finally broken up. I too had heard that the problems were = primarily mechanical, rather than tonal, although a French baroque more-or-less copy would have had limited usefulness in an Anglican church, I'd think. I = vaguely recall it being used for a performance of the Vierne Mass for two organs, but not much else. <p>That the gallery was previously "sans orgue" is not totally accurate .... there had been an antiphonal/echo previously, at least since the time of the GDH rebuild in the '50s, including (if memory serves) some kind of big solo reed ... or maybe it was REMOVED in the GDH rebuild ... I = don't recall seeing stop-knobs for it when I played the organ sometime in the late '50s / early '60s AFTER the rebuild, but it could have been removed in preparation for the Adams by then, or there could have been another rebuild in the interim. At any rate, there had been SOMETHING back there at SOME time (grin), but not (I think) a separate console. <p>Another NYC curiosity ... does anyone know the history of the rather large chancel swallow's nest organ at Smoky Mary's? Was there ever a = separate console, or was it only playable from the Jardine in the back? I = understand there are plans to revive it (the Jardine chest is still there, but not the pipes) ... were the Jardine pipes incorporated into the E.M. Skinner? Did Smoky Mary's have a chancel (ritual?) choir at one time? I know there are two consoles NOW, with preparations for a Chancel division. <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <p>Hugh Drogemuller wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE>&nbsp;At 07:47 23/04/2001 -0400,&nbsp; Arthur wrote: <blockquote type=3Dcite class=3Dcite cite><font face=3D"arial"><font = size=3D-1>&nbsp;That's the church where, in the 60s, they spent a</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial"><font size=3D-1>huge of money to install a = "baroque" pipe organ in the rear organ loft</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial"><font size=3D-1>(previously sans orgue).&nbsp; It turned out to be such a flop that eventually</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial"><font size=3D-1>they disposed of = it.</font></font></blockquote>   <p><br>(SNIP) <br>I was under the impression that the rear gallery instrument was very French in style and that the quality of sound was excellent. The problems were in the action and chests? <p>HD</blockquote> </html>   --------------D6D15817265ADED340F27C62--    
(back) Subject: Re: Medinah Temple Austin (crossposted) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 10:32:46 -0500   Jon C. Habermaas wrote:   > According to a abc7chicago news story last Friday, the Austin is = currently > being removed from the Medinah Temple building as the new owner prepares = to > convert the venerable auditorium into retail space. The organ had to go, > and since a buyer was not found, the organ was donated to the City of > Chicago in order to preserve the instrument. The city is removing the = organ > and storing it using a city crew under the supervision of Austin Organ > Company employees. >   I understand the building is to become a Bloomingdales. Lord & Taylor, of course, have a six-manual in their Philadelphia store (formerly = Wanamakers). Has anyone tried asking Bloomingdales why they think they have a less = cultured staff and customers than Lord & Taylor? <g>   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Thomas From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 10:40:14 -0500     --------------63AF60F0917978BB881B0496 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Robert Clooney wrote:   > Ever been there at a festal Evensong when both organs are being > played? Or, when they switch verses back and forth, then join > in together on the refrain? It's chilling. Glorious sound is > bouncing all round the space. One sees heads start to swivel > and, in laymen's terms thinking to themselves, is that the > front one or the back one playing? "Lighten our darkness, we > beseech thee O Lord . . . "   .... and then a subway train passes under the church and obliterates everything ...   John Speller   --------------63AF60F0917978BB881B0496 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML> <BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#FFFFFF"> Robert Clooney wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE><STYLE></STYLE> <FONT SIZE=3D-1>Ever been there at a festal Evensong when both organs are being played?&nbsp; Or, when they switch verses back and forth, then join in together on the refrain?&nbsp; It's chilling.&nbsp; Glorious sound is bouncing all round the space.&nbsp; One sees heads start to swivel and, in laymen's terms thinking to = themselves, is that the front one or the back one playing?</FONT>&nbsp;<FONT = SIZE=3D-1>"Lighten our darkness, we beseech thee O Lord . . . "</FONT>&nbsp;</BLOCKQUOTE> .... and then a subway train passes under the church and obliterates = everything .... <P>John Speller </BODY> </HTML>   --------------63AF60F0917978BB881B0496--    
(back) Subject: Re: Medinah Temple Austin (crossposted) From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 10:59:54 -0500   At 10:32 AM 4/23/01 -0500, John L. Speller wrote:   >I understand the building is to become a Bloomingdales. Lord & Taylor, = of >course, have a six-manual in their Philadelphia store (formerly = Wanamakers). >Has anyone tried asking Bloomingdales why they think they have a less = cultured >staff and customers than Lord & Taylor? <g> Many groups and individuals including the Chicago OHS Chapter lobbied hard =   to convince to new owners to retain the organ....they were not interested and stated that the organ chambers occupied too much space which could be better utilized for retail purposes.   jch    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Thomas From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 12:14:19 EDT     --part1_21.a9299ec.2815aedb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Just for the benefit of the doubters... here is an excerpt from the St. Thomas webpage:   The Saint Thomas Soup Kitchen lay ministry to the homeless welcomes new volunteers throughout the year, but especially during the summer months. = Each Saturday morning, between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., approximately 350 lunches are prepared at the Choir School (202 West 58th Street) by the students and adult volunteers and then distributed on various street = routes. For every additional volunteer, a further 20 homeless people can be fed. ~~~ Not too shabby!   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/       --part1_21.a9299ec.2815aedb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Just for the benefit of = the doubters... here is an excerpt from the St. <BR>Thomas webpage: <BR> <BR>The Saint Thomas <B>Soup Kitchen</B> lay ministry to the homeless = welcomes new <BR>volunteers throughout the year, but especially during the summer = months. Each <BR>Saturday morning, between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., approximately 350 =   <BR>lunches are prepared at the Choir School (202 West 58th Street) by the =   <BR>students and adult volunteers and then distributed on various street = routes. <BR>For every additional volunteer, a further 20 homeless people can be = fed. <BR> <BR>~~~ <BR>Not too shabby! <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_21.a9299ec.2815aedb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice... From: <JamesM8336@aol.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 12:22:24 EDT     --part1_43.13f61a6b.2815b0c0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 4/21/01 10:40:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:     > And why is it that choir directors tend to get more money than >   However, they do need to spend hours planning the music to be used. Being =   organist and choir director, I am very aware of this!   Jim   --part1_43.13f61a6b.2815b0c0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 4/21/01 10:40:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>runyonr@muohio.edu writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">And why is it that = choir directors tend to get more money than <BR>organists when _they_ don't have to spend hours = practicing?</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>However, they do need to spend hours planning the music to be used. = &nbsp;Being <BR>organist and choir director, I am very aware of this! <BR> <BR>Jim</FONT></HTML>   --part1_43.13f61a6b.2815b0c0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice... From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 12:39:21 EDT     --part1_cb.103d54f3.2815b4b9_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 4/23/01 9:23:31 AM Pacific Daylight Time, JamesM8336@aol.com writes:     > However, they do need to spend hours planning the music to be used. = Being > organist and choir director, I am very aware of this! >   Having done both for years, I feel it's more work to learn the music, especially for rehearsal and performance, than it is to pick it out. In =   addition, there is more of a burden on the accompanist for the success of = the music than there is on the director. It's much easier for a choir to continue if a director faints than if the organist faints!! ;-)   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_cb.103d54f3.2815b4b9_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 4/23/01 9:23:31 AM Pacific Daylight Time, <BR>JamesM8336@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">However, they do = need to spend hours planning the music to be used. &nbsp;Being <BR>organist and choir director, I am very aware of this! <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>Having done both for years, I feel it's more work to learn the music, <BR>especially for rehearsal and performance, than it is to pick it out. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;In <BR>addition, there is more of a burden on the accompanist for the success = of the <BR>music than there is on the director. &nbsp;It's much easier for a = choir to <BR>continue if a director faints than if the organist faints!! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_cb.103d54f3.2815b4b9_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Professional Musicians don't need to practice... From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 09:48:24 -0700     --------------EF582B0C0C84A305AEA7DD05 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Does ANYBODY in an Anglican church REALLY balance the two responsibilities?   Perhaps those with paid choirs can spend less time on the choral side, but I've been in anglo-catholic churches with mostly volunteer choirs for most of my career, and the choral side has ALWAYS consumed about 90% of my time and energy.   I find this to be true now, even though I'm in a full-time situation ... in the case of St. Matthew's, composing, printing, and graphics layouts for the service-books take up most of what might be organ practice time.   Fortunately I have a low-maintenance repertoire of organ music for the service ... if I didn't, they'd get even more improvisations than they do now (grin).   Practically speaking, the opening voluntary takes five minutes; the closing voluntary even less; but in the course of the service the choir sings about 30 minutes' worth of music every Sunday. Not ALL of it changes EVERY Sunday, to be sure; but it changes often ENOUGH that it has to be PREPARED.   Cheers,   Bud   JamesM8336@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 4/21/01 10:40:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time, > runyonr@muohio.edu writes: > > > >> And why is it that choir directors tend to get more money than >> organists when _they_ don't have to spend hours practicing? > > However, they do need to spend hours planning the music to be used. > Being > organist and choir director, I am very aware of this! > > Jim   --------------EF582B0C0C84A305AEA7DD05 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> Does ANYBODY in an Anglican church REALLY balance the two = responsibilities? <p>Perhaps those with paid choirs can spend less time on the choral side, but I've been in anglo-catholic churches with mostly volunteer choirs for most of my career, and the choral side has ALWAYS consumed about 90% of my time and energy. <p>I find this to be true now, even though I'm in a full-time situation .... in the case of St. Matthew's, composing, printing, and graphics = layouts for the service-books take up most of what might be organ practice time. <p>Fortunately I have a low-maintenance repertoire of organ music for the service ... if I didn't, they'd get even more improvisations than they do now (grin). <p>Practically speaking, the opening voluntary takes five minutes; the closing voluntary even less; but in the course of the service the choir sings about 30 minutes' worth of music every Sunday. Not ALL of it changes EVERY Sunday, to be sure; but it changes often ENOUGH that it has to be PREPARED. <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <p>JamesM8336@aol.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>In = a message dated 4/21/01 10:40:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time,</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>runyonr@muohio.edu = writes:</font></font> <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><font = face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>And why is it that choir directors tend to get more money than</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>organists when _they_ = don't have to spend hours practicing?</font></font></blockquote>   <p><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>However, they do need to spend hours planning the music to be used.&nbsp; Being</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>organist and choir = director, I am very aware of this!</font></font> <p><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font = size=3D-1>Jim</font></font></blockquote> </html>   --------------EF582B0C0C84A305AEA7DD05--    
(back) Subject: Re: Practice, and keeping the organ locked From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 12:49:06 EDT   Hi Bud:   So much for open consoles to accomodate the young organist. People ruin things for themselves by their egregious actions. It's really too bad that you have to lock things up. Burgular alarm, for the tabernacle, That should get strong consideration in light of what's already happened.   Sounds to me like someone who knows organs well enough, knows how to cancel combination pistons. I'd really investigate that one! It's got = to be someone who knows you, and that's not funny!   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Noehren's invention From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 12:59:06 EDT     --part1_d.13858a2f.2815b95a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Some decades ago, organist Robert Noehren built a number of organs, the = most celebrated of which was (is?) the organ in St. John's R.C. Cathedral in Milwaukee.   For these organs, Mr. Noehren invented a computerized system, whereby the organist could punch his chosen combinations onto a computerized card. = That computer card would then carry a permanent record of the combinations. Which, I presume, could be re-activated by punching the card into the appropriate slot in the organ console.   For some reason, this invention does not seem to have been adopted by = other organ companies. Whether that is because Noehren holds the patent, or for =   some other reason, I don't know. But it certainly sounds like a good idea = to me.   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_d.13858a2f.2815b95a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Some decades ago, = organist Robert Noehren built a number of organs, the most <BR>celebrated of which was (is?) the organ in St. John's R.C. Cathedral = in <BR>Milwaukee. <BR> <BR>For these organs, Mr. Noehren invented a computerized system, whereby = the <BR>organist could punch his chosen combinations onto a computerized card. = &nbsp;That <BR>computer card would then carry a permanent record of the combinations. = &nbsp; <BR>Which, I presume, could be re-activated by punching the card into the <BR>appropriate slot in the organ console. <BR> <BR>For some reason, this invention does not seem to have been adopted by = other <BR>organ companies. &nbsp;Whether that is because Noehren holds the = patent, or for <BR>some other reason, I don't know. &nbsp;But it certainly sounds like a = good idea to <BR>me. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_d.13858a2f.2815b95a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Glorious sounds, swiveling heads, etc. From: <ALamirande@aol.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 13:21:48 EDT     --part1_e5.54304e2.2815beac_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   If I want to hear glorious sounds coming from both front and rear, I'll go = to l'Oratoire St. Joseph in Montreal, where there is a glorious choir in the front (behind the high altar) and a glorious organ in the back (in the "tribune"). Most Montrealais know better, though, than to swivel their heads. (Occasionally, some country bumpkins who've wandered in do swivel their heads, when the great organ peals forth in all its majesty, at the post-Gospel fanfare!)   One can also have this experience at Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris; and = other French cathedrals.   As for the Gilbert Adams gallery organ (late 1960s) in St. Thomas Church, = New York: my understanding is that it was intended to be French baroque in character. I was there --- can't remember now if it was 1968 or 1969 --- for the dedicatory recital, which was given by Marie-Claire Alain. If memory = serves, poor Mme Alain got panned by the critic of The New York Times who = attended. The brand-new organ apparently had mechanical problems even on that = opening night, which became only worse as time went on.   I wouldn't know what St. Thomas Church spends on the poor, though I tend = to suspect that they probably spend more on the rent for the rector's posh = Park Avenue apartment! I do know that they've spent huge sums of money on unnecessary luxuries: endless rebuilds of the main organ, two rear gallery =   organs in succession, etc. Plus trying (not very successfully) to undo = the chemical damage inflicted on the walls when the church was first built --- =   back when the spoken word was considered king. There are lots of other churches in New York City with fine organs and even distinguished organs, which they are unable to maintain or restore --- not having a tiny = fraction of St. Thomas's financial resources. To me, it just doesn't seem fair, somehow.   Arthur LaMirande   --part1_e5.54304e2.2815beac_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>If I want to hear = glorious sounds coming from both front and rear, I'll go to <BR>l'Oratoire St. Joseph in Montreal, where there is a glorious choir in = the <BR>front (behind the high altar) and a glorious organ in the back (in the =   <BR>"tribune"). &nbsp;Most Montrealais know better, though, than to swivel = their <BR>heads. &nbsp;(Occasionally, some country bumpkins who've wandered in = do swivel <BR>their heads, when the great organ peals forth in all its majesty, at = the <BR>post-Gospel fanfare!) <BR> <BR>One can also have this experience at Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris; and = other <BR>French cathedrals. <BR> <BR>As for the Gilbert Adams gallery organ (late 1960s) in St. Thomas = Church, New <BR>York: &nbsp;my understanding is that it was intended to be French = baroque in <BR>character. <BR>I was there --- can't remember now if it was 1968 or 1969 --- for the <BR>dedicatory recital, which was given by Marie-Claire Alain. &nbsp;If = memory serves, <BR>poor Mme Alain got panned by the critic of The New York Times who = attended. &nbsp; <BR>The brand-new organ apparently had mechanical problems even on that = opening <BR>night, which became only worse as time went on. <BR> <BR>I wouldn't know what St. Thomas Church spends on the poor, though I = tend to <BR>suspect that they probably spend more on the rent for the rector's = posh Park <BR>Avenue apartment! &nbsp;I do know that they've spent huge sums of = money on <BR>unnecessary luxuries: endless rebuilds of the main organ, two rear = gallery <BR>organs in succession, etc. &nbsp;Plus trying (not very successfully) = to undo the <BR>chemical damage inflicted on the walls when the church was first built = --- <BR>back when the spoken word was considered king. &nbsp;There are lots of = other <BR>churches in New York City with fine organs and even distinguished = organs, <BR>which they are unable to maintain or restore --- not having a tiny fraction <BR>of St. Thomas's financial resources. &nbsp;To me, it just doesn't seem = fair, <BR>somehow. <BR> <BR>Arthur LaMirande</FONT></HTML>   --part1_e5.54304e2.2815beac_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Noehren's invention From: "stan e yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 13:28:10 -0400   Arthur LaMirande wrote:   >Some decades ago, organist Robert Noehren built a number of organs, the most celebrated of which was (is?) the organ in St. John's R.C. Cathedral in Milwaukee.   For these organs, Mr. Noehren invented a computerized system, whereby the organist could punch his chosen combinations onto a computerized card.   I recall Bob using this (or a similar) system at First Baptist, Ann Arbor. The card was clamped in a reader placed on top of the console. This MAY have been an optical reader, a la Allen's 'alterable' stop system, but since the card remained in the reader until replaced by another, it may well have been strictly electrical, i.e., the punch-outs allowed contacts to be made through the card. No punch-out, no contact. Part of its attractiveness was that the resident organist could keep the card for a given piece with the music, perhaps in a library pocket.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh        
(back) Subject: Re: the gallery organs at St. Thomas NYC, and a Smoky Mary's question From: "stan e yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 13:46:08 -0400   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > > That the gallery was previously "sans orgue" is not totally accurate > ... there had been an antiphonal/echo previously, at least since the > time of the GDH rebuild in the '50s, including (if memory serves) some > kind of big solo reed ... or maybe it was REMOVED in the GDH rebuild > ...   The brochure A-S published about St. Thomas shows an west end organ (geographic east end) of three divisions: Grand Choeur, Antiphonal (enclosed), and Pedal. The G.C. had a flue chorus, 16-8-4 reed battery and an 8' chamade. The enclosed divison was 5r of soft stuff. The Pedal had a principal at 16 and 8 and the G.C. bourdon at 16 and 8. A 16 posaune was prepared-for.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh    
(back) Subject: Re: Noehren's invention From: "Jeffrey Trimble" <jtrimble@cc.ysu.edu> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 14:08:27 -0400   At 01:28 PM 4/23/01 -0400, you wrote: >Arthur LaMirande wrote: > ><text deleted...> >For these organs, Mr. Noehren invented a computerized system, whereby >the >organist could punch his chosen combinations onto a computerized card.   Klais organs had this on some of the larger ones. I'm thinking of the "Wurtzburg Cathedral" which houses a V/120-something instrument.   The cards were either plastic or heavy cardboard. Even saw a picture of the computer in a book a while back. If anyone is interested, I'll look it up.           Jeffrey A. Trimble Asst. Catalog Librarian Youngstown State University Youngstown, OH jtrimble@cc.ysu.edu (330) 742-2483