PipeChat Digest #2285 - Sunday, August 5, 2001
 
Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Comment concerning nicking of pipes
  by "westbach" <westbach@t-online.de>
Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Comment concerning nicking of pipes
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
Filling nicks with solder
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Hudson (NY) Choral Society conductor/accompanist openings
  by "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com>
Re: Hudson (NY) Choral Society conductor/accompanist openings
  by <Mick709@aol.com>
Re: Reed pressure and resonator length
  by <RJAYWILL@aol.com>
Happy Birthday
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING & Pipe makers art!
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Hudson (NY) Choral Society conductor/accompanist openings
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 14:30:27 -0700 (PDT)   Dear Paul:   If you were to try to solder those pipes with a regular soldering iron, the pipes would melt. If you used a low-temperature iron, the solder would'nt stick to the languid.   I've tried a couple of times to solder scrap pipes in the shop, and without sizing them and using the correct iron, the pipes would suddenly have a big hole appear. I learned very quickly not to try soldering pipes, and I would NEVER try that out on a job away from the factory and its pipeshop.   D. Keith Morgan --- Paul Valtos <chercapa@enter.net> wrote: > Dear Doug, I guess it would have to do with the kind > of metal the pipes were > made of. I have some 1920 Moller pipes that have > such a degree of lead in > them they could be used as a weapon.If you use those > low temp, pinpoint > soldering irons like those used in electronic, it > should work without > warping anything, Paul > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2001 4:52 PM > Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING > > > > Dear Paul: > > > > Just try filling nicks with heated solder and > you'll > > see very quickly why it can't be done. Just be > sure > > you're not working on a good organ. > > > > D. Keith Morgan > > --- Paul Valtos <chercapa@enter.net> wrote: > > > TO the list, > > > I don't know why those nicks can't be > filled > > > with heated solder and > > > then smoothed and burnished. From what I see of > the > > > pipes that I have, it > > > should not prove too difficult. The result would > act > > > just like the nicks > > > never existed. > > > > > > Paul > > > ----- Original Message ----- > > > From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> > > > To: "PIPECHAT" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > > Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2001 3:45 PM > > > Subject: RE.: NICKING & DE-NICKING > > > > > > > > > > Much has been said on this subject - both > > > seriously > > > > and humorously. > > > > > > > > I'l like to tell you about my philosophy on > > > nicking > > > > based on my experience as a voicer at > > > Aeolian-Skinner. > > > > > > > > Our pipes were made without nicks, and the > > > pipemakers > > > > certainly did not place any nicks in the > languids, > > > nor > > > > did we have a manual telling us how to > arbitrarily > > > > place nicks with no regard for the final > result. > > > > > > > > Our decision to nick was based entirely on the > > > organ > > > > placement and the acoustical environment in > which > > > the > > > > organ was to be installed. If the organ went > to a > > > > resonant stone building and was encased, > speaking > > > > directly into the nave, very little nicking > was > > > done > > > > and then very light nicking was done IN THE > > > BUILDING > > > > to achieve as clear and musical a sound as > > > possible. > > > > If, on the other hand, the organ was to be > buried > > > in > > > > deep chambers and speak indirecty into a > padded > > > cell, > > > > it would be nicked more heavily and the pipes > > > would be > > > > cut up higher so we could sock the wind to > them > > > and > > > > blow the daylights out of the pipes in an > attempt > > > to > > > > blast as much sound out of the chambers as > > > possible so > > > > that the organ would work. Obviously, what > was > > > gained > > > > in volume was lost in quality. > > > > > > > > After leaving Aeolian-Skinner and coming to > Texas, > > > I > > > > installed a small organ for a company in the > > > mid-west > > > > whose name I won't give, because I'm about to > tell > > > you > > > > what I think of their tonal work. > > > > > > > > This organ, amoung other faults, had a > Spitzflote > > > and > > > > Celeste which were sent out with "open toes" > and > > > no > > > > nicks. The organ was installed in a padded > cell > > > and > > > > these pipes made the mose foolish spitting and > > > > sizzling sound you ever heard. I revoiced > them > > > and > > > > nicked the daylights out of them in a > partialluy > > > > successful attempt to achieve a musical sound. > > > This > > > > church found an "expert" to come inspect the > > > organ. > > > > He didn't know a Spitzflote from a > screwdriver, > > > but he > > > > was an "expert". He liked the result and > said, > > > "NOW > > > > WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T NICK THEM!" > > > > > > > > Actually, the best sound this organ made came > out > > > of > > > > the blower room. > > > > > > > > There is no way to say that pipes should be > nicked > > > > this way or that way, and it is absolutely > > > > preposterious to say that pipes should be > > > completely > > > > un-nicked. The same thing applies to wind > > > pressures. > > > > There was a time that I thought they would > replace > > > the > > > > blower with a vacuum pump and get the pipes to > > > speak > > > > by sucking in air - but that's another > subject. > > > > > > > > D. Keith Morgan > > > > > > > > > __________________________________________________ > > > > Do You Yahoo!? > > > > Make international calls for as low as > $.04/minute > > > with Yahoo! Messenger > > > > http://phonecard.yahoo.com/ > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > > > organs & related topics > > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: > > > mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > > > organs & related topics > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: > mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > > __________________________________________________ > > Do You Yahoo!? > > Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute > with Yahoo! Messenger > > http://phonecard.yahoo.com/ > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > =3D=3D=3D message truncated =3D=3D=3D     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger http://phonecard.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 04 Aug 2001 17:42:18 -0400       Paul Valtos wrote:   > TO the list, > I don't know why those nicks can't be filled with heated solder and > then smoothed and burnished. From what I see of the pipes that I have, = it > should not prove too difficult. The result would act just like the nicks > never existed. > Paul   Hi Paul, Would this procedure not change the intended density of the metal, and result in a whole different voicing issue? I have also learned that many different formulations of solder have been used in the past, and any incompatibility might rear it's ugly head in a most unpleasant manner. If = you intend to try soldering your pipes, I would be most interested in a = follow-up report on your success, or otherwise.   Thanks Mike    
(back) Subject: Re: Comment concerning nicking of pipes From: "westbach" <westbach@t-online.de> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 23:41:31 +0200   Dear List,   During the 1997/98 restoration of the 1732 A. Silbermann organ in = Ebersm=FCnster, Alsace (France), fine nicking of some pipes, attributed to Silbermann = himself, was documented. Don't all organ historians agree that nicking has been = practiced at least since the time of the oldest organs which are still in existence = today? Isn't it a simply a technique, amoung others, used to voice a pipe? = Whether the result sounds "good" or "bad" depends on all the factors previously = mentioned by others, and not simply whether a pipe has the presence of nicking or not. = So, shouldn't the myth that nicking is always a questionable technique be put = to rest? I personally learned of the anti-nicking bias from E.Power Biggs' = records.   Would it be fair to say that if the only purpose of nicking pipes was to = speed up voicing rather than taking the time to carefully fit the speech/tone of = the pipe to the organ and room, then it probably is not a technique that should be encouraged?   In the very readable book by L.G. Monette, "The Art of Organ Voicing", the = author describes the removal of nicking in some wooden and metal pipes (p.122 - = 123) as he details the rebuilding and revoicing of a church organ.   I have learned that many of the historical organs of which I am familar = were built on site; for example, apparently A. Silbermann cast the metal for = the (metal) pipes in his workshop in Stra=DFbourg, but actually assembled them =   (soldering, etc.) in the abbey at Ebersm=FCnster.   Sam Westbrook        
(back) Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 17:58:11 -0400   Dear Doug, I used those pipes from that old Moller as a facade for the = electronic in the house. Some of the ears were knocked off. I used a soldering iron = to resolder the ears I fabricated back on and had no problem. Again I think it has to do with the kind of metal. I think that a = high zinc content would take solder well as opposed to spotted metal or a = really high lead content. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2001 5:30 PM Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING     > Dear Paul: > > If you were to try to solder those pipes with a > regular soldering iron, the pipes would melt. If you > used a low-temperature iron, the solder would'nt stick > to the languid. > > I've tried a couple of times to solder scrap pipes in > the shop, and without sizing them and using the > correct iron, the pipes would suddenly have a big hole > appear. I learned very quickly not to try soldering > pipes, and I would NEVER try that out on a job away > from the factory and its pipeshop. > > D. Keith Morgan > --- Paul Valtos <chercapa@enter.net> wrote: > > Dear Doug, I guess it would have to do with the kind > > of metal the pipes were > > made of. I have some 1920 Moller pipes that have > > such a degree of lead in > > them they could be used as a weapon.If you use those > > low temp, pinpoint > > soldering irons like those used in electronic, it > > should work without > > warping anything, Paul > > ----- Original Message ----- > > From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> > > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2001 4:52 PM > > Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING > > > > > > > Dear Paul: > > > > > > Just try filling nicks with heated solder and > > you'll > > > see very quickly why it can't be done. Just be > > sure > > > you're not working on a good organ. > > > > > > D. Keith Morgan > > > --- Paul Valtos <chercapa@enter.net> wrote: > > > > TO the list, > > > > I don't know why those nicks can't be > > filled > > > > with heated solder and > > > > then smoothed and burnished. From what I see of > > the > > > > pipes that I have, it > > > > should not prove too difficult. The result would > > act > > > > just like the nicks > > > > never existed. > > > > > > > > Paul > > > > ----- Original Message ----- > > > > From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> > > > > To: "PIPECHAT" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > > > Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2001 3:45 PM > > > > Subject: RE.: NICKING & DE-NICKING > > > > > > > > > > > > > Much has been said on this subject - both > > > > seriously > > > > > and humorously. > > > > > > > > > > I'l like to tell you about my philosophy on > > > > nicking > > > > > based on my experience as a voicer at > > > > Aeolian-Skinner. > > > > > > > > > > Our pipes were made without nicks, and the > > > > pipemakers > > > > > certainly did not place any nicks in the > > languids, > > > > nor > > > > > did we have a manual telling us how to > > arbitrarily > > > > > place nicks with no regard for the final > > result. > > > > > > > > > > Our decision to nick was based entirely on the > > > > organ > > > > > placement and the acoustical environment in > > which > > > > the > > > > > organ was to be installed. If the organ went > > to a > > > > > resonant stone building and was encased, > > speaking > > > > > directly into the nave, very little nicking > > was > > > > done > > > > > and then very light nicking was done IN THE > > > > BUILDING > > > > > to achieve as clear and musical a sound as > > > > possible. > > > > > If, on the other hand, the organ was to be > > buried > > > > in > > > > > deep chambers and speak indirecty into a > > padded > > > > cell, > > > > > it would be nicked more heavily and the pipes > > > > would be > > > > > cut up higher so we could sock the wind to > > them > > > > and > > > > > blow the daylights out of the pipes in an > > attempt > > > > to > > > > > blast as much sound out of the chambers as > > > > possible so > > > > > that the organ would work. Obviously, what > > was > > > > gained > > > > > in volume was lost in quality. > > > > > > > > > > After leaving Aeolian-Skinner and coming to > > Texas, > > > > I > > > > > installed a small organ for a company in the > > > > mid-west > > > > > whose name I won't give, because I'm about to > > tell > > > > you > > > > > what I think of their tonal work. > > > > > > > > > > This organ, amoung other faults, had a > > Spitzflote > > > > and > > > > > Celeste which were sent out with "open toes" > > and > > > > no > > > > > nicks. The organ was installed in a padded > > cell > > > > and > > > > > these pipes made the mose foolish spitting and > > > > > sizzling sound you ever heard. I revoiced > > them > > > > and > > > > > nicked the daylights out of them in a > > partialluy > > > > > successful attempt to achieve a musical sound. > > > > This > > > > > church found an "expert" to come inspect the > > > > organ. > > > > > He didn't know a Spitzflote from a > > screwdriver, > > > > but he > > > > > was an "expert". He liked the result and > > said, > > > > "NOW > > > > > WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T NICK THEM!" > > > > > > > > > > Actually, the best sound this organ made came > > out > > > > of > > > > > the blower room. > > > > > > > > > > There is no way to say that pipes should be > > nicked > > > > > this way or that way, and it is absolutely > > > > > preposterious to say that pipes should be > > > > completely > > > > > un-nicked. The same thing applies to wind > > > > pressures. > > > > > There was a time that I thought they would > > replace > > > > the > > > > > blower with a vacuum pump and get the pipes to > > > > speak > > > > > by sucking in air - but that's another > > subject. > > > > > > > > > > D. Keith Morgan > > > > > > > > > > > > __________________________________________________ > > > > > Do You Yahoo!? > > > > > Make international calls for as low as > > $.04/minute > > > > with Yahoo! Messenger > > > > > http://phonecard.yahoo.com/ > > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > > > > organs & related topics > > > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: > > > > mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > > > > organs & related topics > > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: > > mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > > > > > > __________________________________________________ > > > Do You Yahoo!? > > > Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute > > with Yahoo! Messenger > > > http://phonecard.yahoo.com/ > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > > organs & related topics > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > =3D=3D=3D message truncated =3D=3D=3D > > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger > http://phonecard.yahoo.com/ > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Comment concerning nicking of pipes From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 15:01:09 -0700 (PDT)   In his E-mail, Sam Westbrook wrote:   Would it be fair to say that if the only purpose of nicking pipes was to speed up voicing rather than taking the time to carefully fit the speech/tone of the pipe to the organ and room, then it probably is not a technique that should be encouraged?   Dear Sam:   Nicking has nothing at all to do with speeding up voicing. Nicks are simply to limit transiant noises. In a live building, we don't want to completely eliminate ALL this, because the acoustical liveness of the building handles this as brilliance and transparency. In a padded cell, we have to eliminate a great deal (but not all) of this noise, because if we left the pipes un-nicked, the congregation would be climbing the walls after about two minutes of this.   We can't expect them to pay $100,000 or more for something they can't stand, can we?   D. Keith Morgan --- westbach <westbach@t-online.de> wrote: > Dear List, > > During the 1997/98 restoration of the 1732 A. > Silbermann organ in Ebersm=FCnster, > Alsace (France), fine nicking of some pipes, > attributed to Silbermann himself, > was documented. Don't all organ historians agree > that nicking has been practiced > at least since the time of the oldest organs which > are still in existence today? > Isn't it a simply a technique, amoung others, used > to voice a pipe? Whether the > result sounds "good" or "bad" depends on all the > factors previously mentioned by > others, and not simply whether a pipe has the > presence of nicking or not. So, > shouldn't the myth that nicking is always a > questionable technique be put to > rest? I personally learned of the anti-nicking bias > from E.Power Biggs' records. > > Would it be fair to say that if the only purpose of > nicking pipes was to speed up > voicing rather than taking the time to carefully fit > the speech/tone of the pipe > to the organ and room, then it probably is not a > technique that should be > encouraged? > > In the very readable book by L.G. Monette, "The Art > of Organ Voicing", the author > describes the removal of nicking in some wooden and > metal pipes (p.122 - 123) as > he details the rebuilding and revoicing of a church > organ. > > I have learned that many of the historical organs of > which I am familar were > built on site; for example, apparently A. Silbermann > cast the metal for the > (metal) pipes in his workshop in Stra=DFbourg, but > actually assembled them > (soldering, etc.) in the abbey at Ebersm=FCnster. > > Sam Westbrook > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger http://phonecard.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Filling nicks with solder From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 18:11:12 EDT   I hope you're kidding. If not, be warned: you'll destroy the pipes. SMG  
(back) Subject: Hudson (NY) Choral Society conductor/accompanist openings From: "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 18:58:23 -0400   Dear Pipechatters,   While I was involved in the final day of the Hudson Valley BachFest, an AGO picnic and a Band Concert at West Point, there was a message on Choralist about an opening in the far north of the Hudson Valley.. in Hudson, New York, en route to Tanglewood in the Berkshires..   Perhaps there is an organist in that beautiful area who would enjoy conducting or accompanying the community group.   Pat Maimone Post Chapel West Point, NY III/57 hybrid ----- David Griggs-Janower of Schenectady posted it for a colleague. To: choralist <choralist@lists.colorado.edu> Date: Sunday, July 29, 2001 10:23 AM Subject: Hudson (NY) Valley Choral Society conductor/accompanist openings   >The Hudson Valley Choral Society is seeking to fill the paid positions of >Conductor and Accompanist. Rehearsals Monday evenings at Hudson High >School, Hudson, NY. Concerts the first weekend in December and usually >the last weekend in April. > >For more info: >Ruth Dufault >518/672-4475 or >PO Box 286 >Claverack, NY 12513 ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.  
(back) Subject: Re: Hudson (NY) Choral Society conductor/accompanist openings From: <Mick709@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 19:44:17 EDT     --part1_92.187759e9.289de2d1_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   How does one join the "Choralist" BB?? Would love to see what they have =   listed!   --part1_92.187759e9.289de2d1_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>How does one join the "Choralist" &nbsp;BB?? &nbsp;&nbsp;Would = love to see what they have <BR>listed! </FONT></HTML>   --part1_92.187759e9.289de2d1_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Reed pressure and resonator length From: <RJAYWILL@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 21:27:51 EDT   Didn't the original Willis make some of his really big reeds on 30 - 50 inches of pressure with resonators that were progressively double and = triple length? If I remember correctly, these sets usually had the word harmonic = in the title, as in "Clarion Harmonique".   R Jay Williamson      
(back) Subject: Happy Birthday From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 22:52:13 EDT     --part1_d3.189db208.289e0edd_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Happy Birthday greetings to Simon Preston, whose birthday it is today (Saturday, Aug 4th).   Our classical radio station aired Mr. Preston playing Widor's Toccata = (5th) on the Westminster Abbey Organ. What a delight to hear that first thing = in the morning.   Peace to you all. Neil Brown   --part1_d3.189db208.289e0edd_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>Happy Birthday greetings to Simon Preston, whose birthday it is = today <BR>(Saturday, Aug 4th). <BR> <BR>Our classical radio station aired Mr. Preston playing Widor's Toccata = (5th) <BR>on the Westminster Abbey Organ. &nbsp;What a delight to hear that = first thing in <BR>the morning. <BR> <BR>Peace to you all. <BR>Neil Brown</FONT></HTML>   --part1_d3.189db208.289e0edd_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING & Pipe makers art! From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 23:55:21 EDT   Hi Paul Valtos:   If you read my post of how Richard Bond removed nicks on a rank or two of pipes for me in 1968, you'll understand why using a soldering iron is the exact wrong thing to do. The pipe is solder to a point. That's why=20 pipe makers are paid so well and are sort of kranky. You'll burn a hole in t= he pipe, and then it's all over. Pipe makers use a special paste on the metal that acts as a heat sync. The iron never touches the pipe, the solder is run onto the pipe into the seam. All master builders have to learn to do it=20 right or they don't pass the exam until they can consistantly. The same=20 can be said for all pipe makers in training. After you see how hard it is to= =20 do, you'll throw up your hands and run for the exit. These people make it LOOK easy, IT'S NOT!=20   Richard used a thin metal rod up the pipe foot and scraped the nicks out.   Pipe makers use two or three irons or more heated over a gas or coal=20 fire until the iron begins to glow red. Flux is used on the tip of the iron to hold an amount of solder just before it drips. The handle is made of a special wood that clamps over the free end of the iron. Bar solder about 3/4" wide and 1/2" in depth is suspended over the top of the iron and the solder is run onto the pipe. Flux is applied once or twice during=20 a run. when the solder doesn't run a new iron takes its place and the used one is reheated. As they say it pays to keep your iron hot. Pipe feet are very tricky, as they need to be tacked, with the pipe body and foot in a special trough to hold them steady, in several places then a run is accomplished. If the solder isn't hot enough the joint will crumble and fall apart. Small mixture and upper octave pipes are even tougher. Languids are tough too. Some are real small. :)   All the best   Ron Severin   PS There is no room for mistakes here. I handle all metal pipes with a sort awe and reverence.   http://www.musicbase.org/E/SEV001.html J=E4ger und Brommer Orgelbau St. Mary's by the Sea  
(back) Subject: Re: Hudson (NY) Choral Society conductor/accompanist openings From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sat, 04 Aug 2001 22:51:40 -0500     --------------2FACF9087C627B6E0586BE7B Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit       Mick709@aol.com wrote:   > How does one join the "Choralist" BB?? Would love to see what they > have > listed!   I believe that the details are on the Choralnet website, at   <http://choralnet.org/>   ns     --------------2FACF9087C627B6E0586BE7B Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> <body bgcolor=3D"#FFFFFF"> &nbsp; <p>Mick709@aol.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>How = does one join the "Choralist"&nbsp; BB??&nbsp;&nbsp; Would love to see what they have</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font = size=3D-1>listed!</font></font></blockquote> I believe that the details are on the Choralnet website, at <p>&lt;<A HREF=3D"http://choralnet.org/">http://choralnet.org/</A>> <p>ns <br>&nbsp; </body> </html>   --------------2FACF9087C627B6E0586BE7B--