PipeChat Digest #2287 - Monday, August 6, 2001
 
Research
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Research
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING & Pipe makers art!
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: An Open Letter From Scott Foppiano
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Pipemakers' Soldering Irons
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
Re: Happy Birthday
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net>
Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
Solemnity of the Transfiguration (anticipated) - St. Matthew's ACC,  Cost
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
ALL READ - Quoting in Replies
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons
  by <mts@intergrafix.net>
Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Research From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 07:20:24 -0400   Hi all, I am doing some research on a couple of old pipe organs and have come across the name of James P. Bartholomay, Dorchester Mass. organ builder. There is no specific date regarding his work, most likely rebuilding rather than organ construction, possibly around 1914 and maybe earlier. Any clues as to his identity and when he was in business? = Thanks in advance. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Re: Research From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 05 Aug 2001 06:41:36 -0500   Judy A. Ollikkala wrote:   > Hi all, I am doing some research on a couple of old pipe organs and have > come across the name of James P. Bartholomay, Dorchester Mass. organ > builder. There is no specific date regarding his work, most likely > rebuilding rather than organ construction, possibly around 1914 and = maybe > earlier. Any clues as to his identity and when he was in business? = Thanks > in advance.   James Bartholomay is a new one to me. Perhaps he was a relation of = Frederick Bartholomay, who was manager of Roosevelt's Philadelphia branch and later = had his own business in the Philadelphia area.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING & Pipe makers art! From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 12:40:26 -0400   Dear Ron, I've seen the soldering "irons" used by the pipe makers and the= se harken back to the time of the forge, horse shoes and swords. The new electronic jobs heat up quickly, heat up the area to be soldered in secon= ds and are concentrated in a a small area. As I said, I soldered ears on a f= ew pipes with my elecronic iron with no holes, warping or dissolution. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2001 11:55 PM Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING & Pipe makers art!     > Hi Paul Valtos: > > If you read my post of how Richard Bond removed nicks on a rank or two > of pipes for me in 1968, you'll understand why using a soldering iron i= s > the exact wrong thing to do. The pipe is solder to a point. That's why > pipe makers are paid so well and are sort of kranky. You'll burn a hole= in the > pipe, and then it's all over. Pipe makers use a special paste on the me= tal > that acts as a heat sync. The iron never touches the pipe, the solder i= s > run onto the pipe into the seam. All master builders have to learn to d= o it > right or they don't pass the exam until they can consistantly. The same > can be said for all pipe makers in training. After you see how hard it = is to > do, > you'll throw up your hands and run for the exit. These people make it L= OOK > easy, IT'S NOT! > > Richard used a thin metal rod up the pipe foot and scraped the nicks ou= t. > > Pipe makers use two or three irons or more heated over a gas or coal > fire until the iron begins to glow red. Flux is used on the tip of the iron > to hold an amount of solder just before it drips. The handle is made of > a special wood that clamps over the free end of the iron. Bar solder > about 3/4" wide and 1/2" in depth is suspended over the top of the iron > and the solder is run onto the pipe. Flux is applied once or twice duri= ng > a run. when the solder doesn't run a new iron takes its place and > the used one is reheated. As they say it pays to keep your iron hot. > Pipe feet are very tricky, as they need to be tacked, with the pipe bod= y > and foot in a special trough to hold them steady, in several places > then a run is accomplished. If the solder isn't hot enough the joint wi= ll > crumble and fall apart. Small mixture and upper octave pipes are even > tougher. Languids are tough too. Some are real small. :) > > All the best > > Ron Severin > > PS There is no room for mistakes here. I handle all metal pipes with > a sort awe and reverence. > > http://www.musicbase.org/E/SEV001.html > J=E4ger und Brommer Orgelbau > St. Mary's by the Sea > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: An Open Letter From Scott Foppiano From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 10:37:17 -0700 (PDT)   Yes, God bless you.   --- OrganMD@aol.com wrote: > Scott..... > > I for one am sorry to hear of your departure. May > God's speed be with you. > > Bill Hesterman >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger http://phonecard.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 14:02:38 EDT   Pipechatters:   I do not know of any pipemakers currently heating their soldering irons = over an open pyre, switching off mid-seam to a feistier brander as they subsequently cool.   Modern pipemaking irons are electric, and come in both 110 and 220 volt varieties, as well as wattages of 200 and 250. Pipemakers select their = irons based upon the alloys being used. European styles may vary from the aforementioned.   The average pipemaker's iron weighs about two pounds, including the replaceable copper soldering tip, which is grindable and shapeable by the pipemaker according to his or her preference for technique.   If list members are still determined to experiment with home-grown = equipment and without guidance, they should invest in a scrap rank of pipes, with = their own funds, before attempting to work on anybody else's property. The = enemy of the pipe organ has never been the electronic organ, it has always been pipe organ butchery.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 11:13:13 -0700 (PDT)   Dear Mr. Gluck:   AMEN!!!!!In my career as a pipe organ technician, the most trouble I have had (about80%) has been because of tinkerers messing around trying to "improve" an organ (in a couple of cases, G. Donald Harrison masterpipces.   I say to everyone: If you are not an experienced voicer and tonal finisher, LEAVE THE PIPES ALONE.   D. Keith Morgan --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > Pipechatters: > > I do not know of any pipemakers currently heating > their soldering irons over > an open pyre, switching off mid-seam to a feistier > brander as they > subsequently cool. > > Modern pipemaking irons are electric, and come in > both 110 and 220 volt > varieties, as well as wattages of 200 and 250. > Pipemakers select their irons > based upon the alloys being used. European styles > may vary from the > aforementioned. > > The average pipemaker's iron weighs about two > pounds, including the > replaceable copper soldering tip, which is grindable > and shapeable by the > pipemaker according to his or her preference for > technique. > > If list members are still determined to experiment > with home-grown equipment > and without guidance, they should invest in a scrap > rank of pipes, with their > own funds, before attempting to work on anybody > else's property. The enemy > of the pipe organ has never been the electronic > organ, it has always been > pipe organ butchery. > > Sebastian Matthaus Gluck > New York City > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger http://phonecard.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Happy Birthday From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 14:19:14 EDT     --part1_11c.2afdf81.289ee822_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/5/2001 3:44:52 AM Eastern Daylight Time, marika57@earthlink.net writes:     > He shares his birthday with the Queen Mother who turned 101 on August 4. =     That in itself places him in good company. Mr. Preston, however, was born = in 1938, according to the radio announcer.   Neil B   --part1_11c.2afdf81.289ee822_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 8/5/2001 3:44:52 AM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>marika57@earthlink.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">He shares his = birthday with the Queen Mother who turned 101 on August 4. </FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>That in itself places him in good company. &nbsp;Mr. Preston, however, = was born in <BR>1938, according to the radio announcer. <BR> <BR>Neil B</FONT></HTML>   --part1_11c.2afdf81.289ee822_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net> Date: Sun, 05 Aug 2001 13:51:17 -0500   I am not a pipemaker, so I can't really add much (other than I agree with Mr. Gluck, if you must experiment, do it on old pipes), but I have done = some minor pipe repair on site, and added pipe hooks for facade pipes. For = these jobs I used a large electric iron much like described below, but in the shop, I know all the pipemakers use small irons heated in gas ovens. I don't think I've ever seen the electric irons used anywhere on new pipes. That's what I can contribute. Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://www.geocities.com/organwebring The Organ Classifieds http://www.organclassifieds.com ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2001 1:02 PM Subject: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons     > Pipechatters: > > I do not know of any pipemakers currently heating their soldering irons over > an open pyre, switching off mid-seam to a feistier brander as they > subsequently cool. > > Modern pipemaking irons are electric, and come in both 110 and 220 volt > varieties, as well as wattages of 200 and 250. Pipemakers select their irons > based upon the alloys being used. European styles may vary from the > aforementioned. > > The average pipemaker's iron weighs about two pounds, including the > replaceable copper soldering tip, which is grindable and shapeable by = the > pipemaker according to his or her preference for technique. > > If list members are still determined to experiment with home-grown equipment > and without guidance, they should invest in a scrap rank of pipes, with their > own funds, before attempting to work on anybody else's property. The enemy > of the pipe organ has never been the electronic organ, it has always = been > pipe organ butchery. > > Sebastian Matthaus Gluck > New York City > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 12:45:22 -0700 (PDT)   Dear Paul:   On the old Moller case pipes, you were soldering zink. On the smaller pipes (lead, spotted metal, or tin), if the iron is the least bit too hot, and if the pipes are not properly sized, a big hole will be melted in the pipe.   I was talking about someone's remark that nicks in the languid might be filled in with solder.   That can't be done for two reasons: (1) The languid must have a sharp edge and an exact bevel for proper voicing, and (2) one would have to be so very careful not to touch the lower lip with a hot iron. If they did, a big hole would appear, and the pipe would be gone with no hope of re-voicing. Also, the solderer would get a big surprise if he were holding the pipe in his lap.   D. Keith Morgan --- Paul Valtos <chercapa@enter.net> wrote: > Dear Doug, > I used those pipes from that old Moller as a > facade for the electronic > in the house. Some of the ears were knocked off. I > used a soldering iron to > resolder the ears I fabricated back on and had no > problem. > Again I think it has to do with the kind of > metal. I think that a high > zinc content would take solder well as opposed to > spotted metal or a really > high lead content. > > Paul > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2001 5:30 PM > Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING > > > > Dear Paul: > > > > If you were to try to solder those pipes with a > > regular soldering iron, the pipes would melt. If > you > > used a low-temperature iron, the solder would'nt > stick > > to the languid. > > > > I've tried a couple of times to solder scrap pipes > in > > the shop, and without sizing them and using the > > correct iron, the pipes would suddenly have a big > hole > > appear. I learned very quickly not to try > soldering > > pipes, and I would NEVER try that out on a job > away > > from the factory and its pipeshop. > > > > D. Keith Morgan > > --- Paul Valtos <chercapa@enter.net> wrote: > > > Dear Doug, I guess it would have to do with the > kind > > > of metal the pipes were > > > made of. I have some 1920 Moller pipes that have > > > such a degree of lead in > > > them they could be used as a weapon.If you use > those > > > low temp, pinpoint > > > soldering irons like those used in electronic, > it > > > should work without > > > warping anything, Paul > > > ----- Original Message ----- > > > From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> > > > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > > Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2001 4:52 PM > > > Subject: Re: NICKING & DE-NICKING > > > > > > > > > > Dear Paul: > > > > > > > > Just try filling nicks with heated solder and > > > you'll > > > > see very quickly why it can't be done. Just > be > > > sure > > > > you're not working on a good organ. > > > > > > > > D. Keith Morgan > > > > --- Paul Valtos <chercapa@enter.net> wrote: > > > > > TO the list, > > > > > I don't know why those nicks can't be > > > filled > > > > > with heated solder and > > > > > then smoothed and burnished. From what I see > of > > > the > > > > > pipes that I have, it > > > > > should not prove too difficult. The result > would > > > act > > > > > just like the nicks > > > > > never existed. > > > > > > > > > > Paul > > > > > ----- Original Message ----- > > > > > From: "douglas morgan" > <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> > > > > > To: "PIPECHAT" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > > > > Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2001 3:45 PM > > > > > Subject: RE.: NICKING & DE-NICKING > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Much has been said on this subject - both > > > > > seriously > > > > > > and humorously. > > > > > > > > > > > > I'l like to tell you about my philosophy > on > > > > > nicking > > > > > > based on my experience as a voicer at > > > > > Aeolian-Skinner. > > > > > > > > > > > > Our pipes were made without nicks, and the > > > > > pipemakers > > > > > > certainly did not place any nicks in the > > > languids, > > > > > nor > > > > > > did we have a manual telling us how to > > > arbitrarily > > > > > > place nicks with no regard for the final > > > result. > > > > > > > > > > > > Our decision to nick was based entirely on > the > > > > > organ > > > > > > placement and the acoustical environment > in > > > which > > > > > the > > > > > > organ was to be installed. If the organ > went > > > to a > > > > > > resonant stone building and was encased, > > > speaking > > > > > > directly into the nave, very little > nicking > > > was > > > > > done > > > > > > and then very light nicking was done IN > THE > > > > > BUILDING > > > > > > to achieve as clear and musical a sound as > > > > > possible. > > > > > > If, on the other hand, the organ was to be > > > buried > > > > > in > > > > > > deep chambers and speak indirecty into a > > > padded > > > > > cell, > > > > > > it would be nicked more heavily and the > pipes > > > > > would be > > > > > > cut up higher so we could sock the wind to > > > them > > > > > and > > > > > > blow the daylights out of the pipes in an > > > attempt > > > > > to > > > > > > blast as much sound out of the chambers as > > > > > possible so > > > > > > that the organ would work. Obviously, > what > > > was > > > > > gained > > > > > > in volume was lost in quality. > > > > > > > > > > > > After leaving Aeolian-Skinner and coming > to > > > Texas, > > > > > I > > > > > > installed a small organ for a company in > the > > > > > mid-west > > > > > > whose name I won't give, because I'm about > to > > > tell > > > > > you > > > > > > what I think of their tonal work. > > > > > > > > > > > > This organ, amoung other faults, had a > > > Spitzflote > > > > > and > > > > > > Celeste which were sent out with "open > toes" > > > and > > > > > no > > > > > > nicks. The organ was installed in a > padded > > > cell > > > > > and > > > > > > these pipes made the mose foolish spitting > and > > > > > > sizzling sound you ever heard. I revoiced > > > them > > > > > and > > > > > > nicked the daylights out of them in a > > > partialluy > > > > > > successful attempt to achieve a musical > sound. > > > > > This > > > > > > church found an "expert" to come inspect > the > > > > > organ. > > > > > > He didn't know a Spitzflote from a > > > screwdriver, > > > > > but he > > > > > > was an "expert". He liked the result and > =3D=3D=3D message truncated =3D=3D=3D     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger http://phonecard.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Solemnity of the Transfiguration (anticipated) - St. Matthew's ACC, Costa Mesa CA (X-Posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 05 Aug 2001 13:20:25 -0700   Voluntaries Recit de Cromorne (Kyrie? ... I forget) - Couperin (Convent Mass) Meditation - Foote Pater Noster - Foote Grand Jeu (Agnus Dei) - Couperin (Convent Mass)   Hymns O Wondrous Type! - Wareham Now Thank We All Our God - Nun danket O Saviour, Precious Saviour - Watermouth Stand Up, Stand Up For Jesus - Webb   Setting Willan/Scottish Chant   Full church at the early Mass; PACKED church at the late Mass.   DREADFUL sermon about stem cell research, for the second Sunday in a row .... "It's IMMORAL for people to want to live long, healthy lives ... they're SUPPOSED to SUFFER for their SINS, in the shadow of the CROSS" .... yada, yada, yada ... this on the Feast of the Transfiguration. Oh well. At least he commemorated John Mason Neale, after I reminded him.   The footings for the new building are laid; pouring the slab should commence shortly.   I was back on the walker today ... no pedals at early Mass ... couldn't get anyone's attention, so had to drag myself to the communion rail.   But, all in all, Good Church (except for the sermon).   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: RE: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 16:59:16 -0400   Hello: I know of one company that was not using electric soldering irons 10 years ago when I witnessed the pipemakers in the "plumbing department" do their work. Casavant-- I sincerely doubt they've converted over to electricity since that time.   Andrew Mead   -----Original Message-----   Pipechatters:   I do not know of any pipemakers currently heating their soldering irons = over an open pyre, switching off mid-seam to a feistier brander as they subsequently cool.   Modern pipemaking irons are electric, and come in both 110 and 220 volt varieties, as well as wattages of 200 and 250. Pipemakers select their irons based upon the alloys being used. European styles may vary from the aforementioned.      
(back) Subject: Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 19:44:10 -0500   At 2:02 PM -0400 8/5/01, TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: >I do not know of any pipemakers currently heating their soldering irons = over >an open pyre, switching off mid-seam to a feistier brander as they >subsequently cool.   Seb   The pipemakers at Eastern Organ Pipes use irons heated on gas burners. And I have seen them switch irons in the middle of a large pipe. I think most of us use the electric ones but some of the pipe shops do still use ones heated on burners. And they do grind them for their own preferences. I seem to remember that one of the pipe makers is left handed and he has his irons ground for his working as a lefty.   David  
(back) Subject: ALL READ - Quoting in Replies From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 19:46:29 -0500   Folks   Please, Please, Please EDIT your replies. I have seen several postings that are replies that have included the whole thread. We all have read it once so except for maybe a very pertinent quote there shouldn't be the whole post that you are replying to included in your posting.   Thanks   And now back to Happy PipeChatting   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons From: <mts@intergrafix.net> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 02:11:22 GMT     <SNIP> > If list members are still determined to experiment with home-grown = equipment > and without guidance, they should invest in a scrap rank of pipes, with = their > own funds, before attempting to work on anybody else's property. The = enemy > of the pipe organ has never been the electronic organ, it has always = been > pipe organ butchery. > > Sebastian Matthaus Gluck > New York City <Schnippers>     Well Said, Mr. Gluck. I couldn't agree more. Even being practiced at = making metal pipework, great care is required. It is not a novice operation. A sense of EXTREME = care is needed to carry out this daunting task. Soldering nicks? No chance. I've heard of it = being tried, the result was the languid overheating and all kinds of bad things happening. Thank = heavens I didn't see the poor thing, fallen in the line of duty (or rather lack of responsible = duty). Metal content is a substantial factor, but not as much as would be = expected. Taking greatest care and preparation is the key. Nothing is more dissappointing = than when one is almost done then fries a crater in the side of a pipe. ...and it is very = easy to do. Most of my pipemaking "forte" lies in making and voicing wooden = pipes, where I use a non-standard knicking based on a case study of the room. Sure, there are = ideas on what to do, and theory on what sounds like what, but as we know, all cases are = different. I find it more cost effective in time and material to order a fine-made set of quality metal = pipes and then voice to my liking. It seems improbable that I would ever try to remove knicks, and = indeed I cannot   speak from experience on doing so, but I do knick tastefully. That = typewriter sound I so often hear is aggrevating, but crocodile teeth are not my taste either. Best = wishes.   Chris Malocheski      
(back) Subject: Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 05 Aug 2001 19:46:47 -0700   Sebastian - you mean you CAN'T use a SawzAll to shorten pipes? (grinning, = ducking)   Bud   mts@intergrafix.net wrote:   > <SNIP> > > If list members are still determined to experiment with home-grown = equipment > > and without guidance, they should invest in a scrap rank of pipes, = with their > > own funds, before attempting to work on anybody else's property. The = enemy > > of the pipe organ has never been the electronic organ, it has always = been > > pipe organ butchery. > > > > Sebastian Matthaus Gluck > > New York City > <Schnippers> > > Well Said, Mr. Gluck. I couldn't agree more. Even being practiced at = making metal > pipework, > great care is required. It is not a novice operation. A sense of EXTREME = care is needed to > carry > out this daunting task. Soldering nicks? No chance. I've heard of it = being tried, the > result was > the languid overheating and all kinds of bad things happening. Thank = heavens I didn't see > the > poor thing, fallen in the line of duty (or rather lack of responsible = duty). > Metal content is a substantial factor, but not as much as would be = expected. Taking > greatest care and preparation is the key. Nothing is more dissappointing = than when one is > almost done then fries a crater in the side of a pipe. ...and it is very = easy to do. > Most of my pipemaking "forte" lies in making and voicing wooden = pipes, where I use a > non-standard knicking based on a case study of the room. Sure, there are = ideas on what to > do, > and theory on what sounds like what, but as we know, all cases are = different. I find it > more cost > effective in time and material to order a fine-made set of quality metal = pipes and then > voice to > my liking. It seems improbable that I would ever try to remove knicks, = and indeed I cannot > > speak from experience on doing so, but I do knick tastefully. That = typewriter sound I so > often > hear is aggrevating, but crocodile teeth are not my taste either. Best = wishes. > > Chris Malocheski > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org