PipeChat Digest #2290 - Monday, August 6, 2001
 
Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
NYC Recital Thursday Aug. 9
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu>
Re: Pipe Organ Building education for the young at heart
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Pipe Organ Building education for the young at heart
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Builders in NYC and environs
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: The pentultimate pipe organ for the home
  by "Josh Edwards" <fbcorganist@att.net>
RE: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
RE: The pentultimate pipe organ for the home
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
compasses, etc.
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Pipe Organ Building education for the young at heart
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
RE: Pipe Organ Building education for the young at heart
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: compasses, etc.
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Mon, 06 Aug 2001 11:46:59 -0500   Look for:| back issues of ISO Information, and ISO News. American Organbuilding, the journal of the American Institute or = Organbuilders Video and Audio tapes of lectures at AIO conventions and seminars Roy Redman   "COLASACCO, ROBERT" wrote:   > On the subject of organ building, is there a contemporary publication on = the > subject that one would recommend? What I mean by "contemporary" is = published > within the last decade and 1/2. And what I mean by organ building is the > actual art/craft of building an organ and all it involves including = voicing. > (Or should I wake up!) > Robert Colasacco > > -----Original Message----- > From: Paul Valtos [mailto:chercapa@enter.net] > Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2001 11:09 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons > > Dear David, > I remember my father using an electrical soldering iron which had a > hexagonal head to it about a 1" OD (approx) at the head. That was the > clumsiest thing I have ever seen. I know there is an art to making pipes > which takes many years of practice under the guidance of masters but = that is > understood. I would never attempt to make pipes for an organ (that is = that > might have a chance of working) I was just adding my comments that = solder > can work to hold on newly made ears and possibly to rid a pipe of nicks. = I > guess as an old A F engineering officer, I always believe in the = possible, > that there has to be a way.It reminds me of taking the wings off of one > F-105 which had a badly damaged fuselage and putting them on an airplane > that had badly damaged wings. Our problem was what tail number should we > use. > Paul > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2001 8:44 PM > Subject: Re: Pipemakers' Soldering Irons > > > At 2:02 PM -0400 8/5/01, TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > > >I do not know of any pipemakers currently heating their soldering = irons > over > > >an open pyre, switching off mid-seam to a feistier brander as they > > >subsequently cool. > > > > Seb > > > > The pipemakers at Eastern Organ Pipes use irons heated on gas > > burners. And I have seen them switch irons in the middle of a large > > pipe. I think most of us use the electric ones but some of the pipe > > shops do still use ones heated on burners. And they do grind them > > for their own preferences. I seem to remember that one of the pipe > > makers is left handed and he has his irons ground for his working as > > a lefty. > > > > David > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: NYC Recital Thursday Aug. 9 From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 11:51:02 -0500 (EST)     Hi!   The fifth in our summer series of noontime organ recitals will be held this Thursday, August 9, from 12:15 to 12:15, at The Church of the Epiphany.     The program is as follows:   Praeludium in E major Vincent Lubeck   Chant de joie Jean langlais   Impromptu Louis Vierne   fantasy and fugue in g minor J. S. Bach     We're at 1393 York Avenue (at East 74th Street) on the Upper East Side. The organ is Aeolian-Skinner opus 1412 by Joseph Whiteford, and is wonderful. Bring all of your friends, your feng shui consultant, and a fat bagel sandwich and come! Visit our website at www.epiphanynyc.org for more information.   Best   Jonathan    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Organ Building education for the young at heart From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 06 Aug 2001 09:59:35 -0700   I did the same thing when I was young ... I had a subscription to the = Diapason from the time I was in GRADE SCHOOL (grin) ... I think I joined OHS = sometime in the 1960s. I read every book there was about pipe organs and = organ-building in the library.   I HAUNTED organ tuners and organ-builders ... fortunately they were all = very patient. I never got to see pipes actually being made, but I DID see slider-windchests being built, and reeds being cleaned and re-tongued. I = actually got to TUNE a few cone-tuned pipes under John Leek's eagle eye ... he was = the organ curator at Oberlin at the time.   I helped unpack the first wave of Flentrop practice organs at Oberlin ... = it was like Christmas morning (grin) ... at that time, for practice organs we had = only the "Chinese Moller" (so called because it was painted red and black), a one-manual Flentrop, and a bunch of old 2-rank (TOO rank) (grin) = electro-pneumatic unit organs (Lewis & Hitchcock? I don't remember) and some Estey 2 manual = reed organs in the basement of old Warner Hall.   Haskell Thomson's studio organ was a little old three-manual Moller, much = rebuilt and revoiced; Fenner Douglass' studio organ was the original prototype for = the Holtkamp "Martini" series, nicknamed that because Walter Holtkamp Sr. drew = the original sketch on the back of a cocktail napkin, according to legend.   Old Warner Concert Hall was still the Roosevelt/E.M. Skinner/Holtkamp, = with the Skinner console ... the Positiv and Choir stops were on the same knobs ... = you could use one or the other, but not both together; Finney Chapel was the = GDH rebuild of the original big E.M. Skinner (now replaced by the Fisk); the = seminary chapel was a much-rebuilt Estey (now replaced by the Brombaugh).   I've concluded in conversations with builders over the years that you DO = have to be crazy to love the business (grin).   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Organ Building education for the young at heart From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 13:14:43 -0400   Dear Ron, I took lessons at Marywood college from a Sr. Marie Cecelia who was originally from British Columbia. At the time there was anAeolian Skinner = in the Rotunda of the college and I would gove there for lessons and also to watch her play. She was a fantastic woman and despite the old habits and heeled shoes, she was magnificent. I guess the only way this fits into the conversation is the fact that the building burned and the organ was never replaced on the campus. I remember going to my lessons with fear since she was not one to put = up with laziness or a lack of practice. She had studied under Pietro Yon and she could be understanding but uncompromising. I guess this also fits in with all of our reminiscences of the good = old days of freedom and youth. At age 60 I sure miss those days.Ah, how youth = is wasted on the young. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, August 06, 2001 12:33 PM Subject: Re: Pipe Organ Building education for the young at heart     > Hi Robert: > > I don't have clue as to where you live, but there has to be an organ builder > within a reasonable driving distance from you. You may want to see pipes > being made, call them and find out when they may be pouring pipe metal > and making pipes. When I was a teenager @#years ago, I watched this > process many times. You stand out of the way and don't breathe too hard. > Watching is just as much of an art as the actual doing. Find out when > pipes are being voiced. I used to haunt a small organ shop in Los = Angeles > when Pieter Visser and I were both young. I wangled a couple of summer jobs > just to be there. I guess they got darn tired of shooing me home on my > bicycle. Persistence does pay off! I was 14 and Pieter was about 19 at > the time. He was already a master builder, having apprenticed with > Versherin and Flentrop. He told me before he left Holland he had the = keys > to well over 400 famous organs, and was the tuner and maintainer for = them. > Pieter was a civilian pilot during the Vietnam war and flew 747's supply > planes for the US Government. He missed organ building and moved to > TX and formed his own shop and is even now building tracker pipe organs. > He now has honorary Ph D's for his teaching work in the University = system > in TX. I've known Pieter for nearly 45 years, brilliant and focused man. > Do our tonal tastes always match? Probably not, but being human, that's > to be expected. He prefers liturature based instruments, and I prefer > service oriented instruments. I respect him greatly, and is a fine God fearing > soul. > > Perhaps you'll be able to develop a relationship with an organ builder, and > go and watch in silence like a fly on the wall. Noise is a distraction = to > these > highly trained men. I learned shop ettiquette fast. That's how badly I wanted > to learn. I ignored, "Oh God, He's Back!" and just smiled. I was pretty > mature for 14. Sometimes I'd make light of this and quietly bow in their > direction. :) > > Ron Severin > > PS These are rememberances totally treasured after 45 years of observation. > I'm still fascinated by it as I ever was then, perhaps more so now. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Builders in NYC and environs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 06 Aug 2001 10:18:18 -0700   Robert - Sebastian Gluck is building IN New York City, and he's a FINE = builder. I don't know how amenable he is to visitors, but he's on this list ... you = could ask him.   Sadly, a lot of the fine old organs in NYC have been neglected, and are unplayable, but some ARE still playable: Old St. Patrick's Cathedral ... = I can't think of more offhand, but somebody must have the last OHS NYC = convention book at hand.   For a weekend or summer "field trip", you're not that far from one of the greatest hotbeds of good organ-building in this country: New England ... = here's a partial list:   Andover Bishop Fisk Noak   Boston is a virtual history-book of the American organ ... you can learn a = lot just talking your way into organ-lofts (grin).   There's Patrick J. Murphy in Pennsylvania, Taylor and Boody in Virginia, = and if you want to see how organs USED to be built (grin), there's the Austin = factory in Hartford. But they're important, because they (and Wicks) probably = brought the American "factory" organ of the Industrial Revolution period to its = highest point of development, at least from a PRODUCTION standpoint.   I used to make a point of spending summers wandering around doing things = like that ... watching organs being built, watching organs being installed.   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: RE: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 06 Aug 2001 10:19:35 -0700   I have often wondered what the effect would be of having the ranks above 2' on individual sliders, rather than gathered together as mixtures on a single slider with channelled toe-boards. Certainly the SOUND of it in historical Italian organs is quite different, but I wonder how that would translate to an eclectic American organ. I don't recall seeing any examples, probably because of the increased cost of additional sliders and stop-actions.   Isn't the end result that everything above high "C" at 2' pitch breaks back to the lower octave and you end up with a big pile of 8-4-2 2/3-2 in the top of the keyboard? How is that different from what a garden-variety mixture does?   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: The pentultimate pipe organ for the home From: "Josh Edwards" <fbcorganist@att.net> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 13:22:42 -0400   There is no way that an organ that big can be all pipes in a residence. It would be insane... Can anyone figure out more about it?   Josh in TN    
(back) Subject: RE: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 13:30:11 -0400   How many works even go that far up the keyboard! Not many. Have you ever played up there with just the mutations and mixtures! I have just to get a feel for the sound. It's quite ugly. But as I say there aren't many pieces that play that far up with those kinds of registrations.   -----Original Message----- From: quilisma@socal.rr.com [mailto:quilisma@socal.rr.com] Sent: Monday, August 06, 2001 1:20 PM To: pipechat Subject: RE: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style     I have often wondered what the effect would be of having the ranks above 2' on individual sliders, rather than gathered together as mixtures on a single slider with channelled toe-boards. Certainly the SOUND of it in historical Italian organs is quite different, but I wonder how that would translate to an eclectic American organ. I don't recall seeing any examples, probably because of the increased cost of additional sliders and stop-actions.   Isn't the end result that everything above high "C" at 2' pitch breaks back to the lower octave and you end up with a big pile of 8-4-2 2/3-2 in the top of the keyboard? How is that different from what a garden-variety mixture does?   Cheers,   Bud     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: The pentultimate pipe organ for the home From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 13:37:03 -0400   I think I'll e-mail wicks and see what I can find out.   -----Original Message----- From: Josh Edwards [mailto:fbcorganist@att.net] Sent: Monday, August 06, 2001 1:23 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: The pentultimate pipe organ for the home     There is no way that an organ that big can be all pipes in a residence. It would be insane... Can anyone figure out more about it?   Josh in TN     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 06 Aug 2001 10:41:20 -0700       "COLASACCO, ROBERT" wrote:   > How many works even go that far up the keyboard! Not many.   Well, the French Romantics do, but we weren't talking about the French Romantics (grin).   > Have you ever > played up there with just the mutations and mixtures! I have just to get = a > feel for the sound. It's quite ugly.   Messiaen didn't think so (grin).   > But as I say there aren't many pieces > that play that far up with those kinds of registrations. >   Perhaps not overall, but it would still be interesting to have individual pitches like   2/3 1/2 1/3 1/4   and higher to combine with small reeds or flutes, even if you don't PLAY = in the top of the keyboard (where, of course, they would have broken back to lower pitches anyway).   One of my favorite combinations on one organ I played was an 8' Regal with = a 1' Octave ... completely changed the character of the Regal.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 13:47:44 -0400   I didn't say what I played but Messiaen I ain't. Messiaen is God and can = do music perfectly. And as for "exotic" combinations with one or two high mutations is not = what I was referring to either. I'm talking about opening all mutations and mixtures and playing up there, you know, up THERE!!:0   -----Original Message----- From: quilisma@socal.rr.com [mailto:quilisma@socal.rr.com] Sent: Monday, August 06, 2001 1:41 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style         "COLASACCO, ROBERT" wrote:   > How many works even go that far up the keyboard! Not many.   Well, the French Romantics do, but we weren't talking about the French Romantics (grin).   > Have you ever > played up there with just the mutations and mixtures! I have just to get = a > feel for the sound. It's quite ugly.   Messiaen didn't think so (grin).   > But as I say there aren't many pieces > that play that far up with those kinds of registrations. >   Perhaps not overall, but it would still be interesting to have individual pitches like   2/3 1/2 1/3 1/4   and higher to combine with small reeds or flutes, even if you don't PLAY = in the top of the keyboard (where, of course, they would have broken back to lower pitches anyway).   One of my favorite combinations on one organ I played was an 8' Regal with = a 1' Octave ... completely changed the character of the Regal.   Cheers,   Bud     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 14:19:03 EDT   Hi Bud and Robert:   The ear can't differentiate a pure sound beyond G7 or up to C8 so the Italians broke back these individual ranks every octave by an octave lower when the highest perceiveable pitch is reached. They'll play but will fade from human hearing. They do make sense on the bass end of the keyboard drawn as individual ranks instead of a collective draw. The top notes of the 2 2/3' and 2' are in the outer limits of actual = hearing. Maybe someone knows of pieces that go higher than note 56, but I can't think of any. The Gabler Organ In Weingarten Abbey only went to note 49 if I'm not mistaken. Many builders stop at note 54 to 56. Only Dupre used notes 31 and 32 in the pedals, I suppose because they were there, 30 notes would suffice for Bach's music certainly, and = probably for most of the liturature. 32 notes looks pretty though. Auhentic = European pianos have an 85 note compass AAAA to a. I know the English do this. Midmer-Losh organ keyboards CCC to c6 85 notes two on Atlantic City one 73 note GGG to g5 and the rest CC to c4 I could never see the = advantage though.   The French added notes on their pedalboards even down to GGGG 37 notes I suspect for gravity as per last week's discussion of one of the Bach = pieces.   Regards,   Ron Severin   PS Wasn't it Franck or Farnum or somebody who had extra notes of the 32' trombone added to the regular 32 note or 30 note keyboard? I know it was a special order that raised some eyebrows.  
(back) Subject: RE: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 14:32:45 -0400   If you keep this up, Ron, I won't have to buy ANY books or tapes!!     -----Original Message----- From: RonSeverin@aol.com [mailto:RonSeverin@aol.com] Sent: Monday, August 06, 2001 2:19 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: individual ranks of upperwork in the Italian style     Hi Bud and Robert:   The ear can't differentiate a pure sound beyond G7 or up to C8 so the Italians broke back these individual ranks every octave by an octave lower when the highest perceiveable pitch is reached. They'll play but will fade from human hearing. They do make sense on the bass end of the keyboard drawn as individual ranks instead of a collective draw. The top notes of the 2 2/3' and 2' are in the outer limits of actual hearing. Maybe someone knows of pieces that go higher than note 56, but I can't think of any. The Gabler Organ In Weingarten Abbey only went to note 49 if I'm not mistaken. Many builders stop at note 54 to 56. Only Dupre used notes 31 and 32 in the pedals, I suppose because they were there, 30 notes would suffice for Bach's music certainly, and = probably for most of the liturature. 32 notes looks pretty though. Auhentic = European pianos have an 85 note compass AAAA to a. I know the English do this. Midmer-Losh organ keyboards CCC to c6 85 notes two on Atlantic City one 73 note GGG to g5 and the rest CC to c4 I could never see the = advantage though.   The French added notes on their pedalboards even down to GGGG 37 notes I suspect for gravity as per last week's discussion of one of the Bach pieces.   Regards,   Ron Severin   PS Wasn't it Franck or Farnum or somebody who had extra notes of the 32' trombone added to the regular 32 note or 30 note keyboard? I know it was a special order that raised some eyebrows.   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: compasses, etc. From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 06 Aug 2001 11:37:13 -0700       RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > The Gabler Organ In Weingarten Abbey only went > to note 49 if I'm not mistaken. Many builders stop at note 54 to 56.   If I recall correctly, the little one-manual organ that Haydn wrote the = Little Organ Mass for (still extant, but I forget where) only had THREE octaves.   > Only Dupre used notes 31 and 32 in the pedals, I suppose because they > were there,   I find that interesting because most older French organs only have 30 = notes ... I wonder how he played his Prelude and Fugue in g minor at St. Sulpice (or = if he did)?   Sowerby uses all 32 in "Fast and Sinister", doesn't he? I can think of a = few others ... John Cook's "Flourish and Fugue" ... is that the name of it? = Written for the party horn at St. John the Divine in NYC ... what about Reger?   > 30 notes would suffice for Bach's music certainly, and probably > for most of the liturature. 32 notes looks pretty though.   It also requires proper athletic support (grin), if you have short legs = like I do.   > (snip)   > Wasn't it Franck or Farnum or somebody who had extra notes of the > 32' trombone added to the regular 32 note or 30 note keyboard? I know > it was a special order that raised some eyebrows. >   At Church of the Holy Communion in NYC Farnham (which spelling is = correct?) had one or more PARTIAL 32' stops (down to GGGG or FFFF), because they didn't = have money (or space?) for full-compass ones ... I think I read that they came = on with toe studs, rather than drawknobs.   Every time he's mentioned, I think about that HUGE derelict Casavant he = designed in that Episcopal Church in Boston ... Emmanuel, isn't it? They have a = Rodgers digitoid now (sigh) ... the Casavant is still there, but they cut the = elegant console loose and put it in the basement.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Organ Building education for the young at heart From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 13:40:58 -0500   As far as learning the workings of pipe organs, I found that the video "Voices in the Wind" was very good.   I took many books out of the library and read them.   But,,, the real teacher for me, far better than books, was buying a used 4 rank Kilgen and getting into it.   To me, there is nothing better than a 'hands on' when it comes to understanding what the books ~tried~ to explain.   Luther (retired but still learning)    
(back) Subject: RE: Pipe Organ Building education for the young at heart From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 15:12:52 -0400   I'd be very happy to climb into one anytime. I've not had the offer and don't know who I'd ask! I'd even offer to help with anything I can do, IF there's something the untrained or quickly trained can do. I remember climbing into the organ at Heavenly Rest in NYC with my teacher CDWalker = way back when. What an experience.   -----Original Message----- From: Luther Melby [mailto:lmelby@prtel.com] Sent: Monday, August 06, 2001 2:41 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Pipe Organ Building education for the young at heart     As far as learning the workings of pipe organs, I found that the video "Voices in the Wind" was very good.   I took many books out of the library and read them.   But,,, the real teacher for me, far better than books, was buying a used 4 rank Kilgen and getting into it.   To me, there is nothing better than a 'hands on' when it comes to understanding what the books ~tried~ to explain.   Luther (retired but still learning)     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: compasses, etc. From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 15:46:04 EDT   Hi Bud:   The name of that church in Boston, Emmanuel Episcopal, Wasn't that also the church Charles Courboin played for when he arrived in 1904 from Belgium? Something to that effect! Lynnwood Farnum played it for a while and then moved to The Church of the Holy Communion in NYC? There was an artical in either the TAO or Diapason about 2-3 years ago that = mentioned something like that. Now there is an organ begging to be restored, or rebuilt, That Casavant! If memory serves it was approximately 133 ranks, with wing terraced stop knobs. The only reason to move in my estimation would be more money in NYC or things got hot and ugly. I don't know too = much about Lynnwood's temperment. I fall into that school of organ playing by way of Clarence Mader, a direct student of Farnum's to Ladd Thomas to Esther S. Jones my teacher. Farnum studied with Jacques Lemmens. There is a direct line drawn to J.S. Bach through Johann Krebs in this school of playing. Alex Mc Curdy, and three others were also students of Farnum but memory escapes me.   All the best,   ron Severin