PipeChat Digest #2296 - Wednesday, August 8, 2001
 
Re: Kiley, a man of many names
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
re:pedalling
  by "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net>
Re: pedalling
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: pedalling
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Console Motion
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: pedalling
  by <AMADPoet@aol.com>
Re: pedalling
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: pedalling
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Crucifixus
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Crucifixus
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Small churches
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: pedalling
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
WurliTzer recitals in West Australia.
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Kiley, a man of many names From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2001 20:30:44 -0500   I too have the same duplicate platters of Kileys records. As for putting Jesse Crawfords name on some of them, JC was quite popular back then and some recording companies had no ethics, I guess. Crawford's name sold, so.......so what! I seem to remember having a recording of Kiley on Joe Kerns (Dennis the Menace) 3-manual French-style Wurly. He sounded completely different from those "grocery store" bargain platters -quite good, actually. Poor Johnny One-Note et al were corny tunes, but back in the 50s-60s, = there was a revival in organ music with Leon Berry and the great GW, among thers -do I DARE forget Al Melgaard? At least these artists kept a dying instrument alive -albeit many = listeners probably cringed at the playing and music. I don't know the legalities of recording contracts back then, but yes, Kiley's records were re-issued on several labels -but with his same name. BTW, if anyone comes across Guy Melendy, rest assured it IS George Wright!   Have I used-up my nickel yet?   Rick    
(back) Subject: re:pedalling From: "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net> Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2001 21:57:40 -0400   snip........ My teachers always complained that I looked like I was dancing and although one thought it aesthetically pleasing none were in favor of it. Well, I see it as dancing. I have no problem with that, = ie, dancing along the pedal board. I think one should be free to move around = as long as it all comes out well, what's the problem? And that was my answer = to their complaint. snip................................   Sure... what ever...   But... there's a guy out here in my area that plays like that and you = could probably slide a 2 by 4 under is butt when he's playing... and I = have to admit, he looks ridiculous and it shows up as out of control in his playing!   Maybe one should take a video camera and record one's self playing the Jig = Fugue, or the Wedge and see if the shoe fits! Also... listening to the = recording would not be a bad idea either, then you could determine if it is affecting your playing like most of your = teachers have pointed out, or if you do, in fact, "dance across the = pedals" with the greatest of ease!.   Watching most really good players, one will notice the lack of wasted = motion and pure efficiency in their playing...   Wayne    
(back) Subject: Re: pedalling From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2001 23:53:10 EDT     --part1_75.18c8693c.28a211a6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     > Watching most really good players, one will notice the lack of wasted = motion > and pure efficiency in their playing...   Absolutely, and the super good ones are electrifying to watch (even = without all that wasted motion), assuming of course one is in view of the = performance.   I've noticed recently that the pedals on the organ I play have marks where = I know I hit the pedals, regardless of my attempt to play properly. Like hatchet marks. Am I doomed to organ pergatory for this? Do others' pedalboards suffer from the same marks?   I don't hear myself slapping the pedals and I have been more conscious of = my footwork since discovering it.   Cheers, Neil Brown It's hot as h-e-double hockey sticks here at the Jersey Shore       --part1_75.18c8693c.28a211a6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Watching most = really good players, one will notice the lack of wasted motion <BR>and pure efficiency in their playing...</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Absolutely, and the super good ones are electrifying to watch (even = without <BR>all that wasted motion), assuming of course one is in view of the = performance. <BR> <BR>I've noticed recently that the pedals on the organ I play have marks = where I <BR>know I hit the pedals, regardless of my attempt to play properly. = &nbsp;Like <BR>hatchet marks. &nbsp;Am I doomed to organ pergatory for this? &nbsp;Do = others' <BR>pedalboards suffer from the same marks? &nbsp; <BR> <BR>I don't hear myself slapping the pedals and I have been more conscious = of my <BR>footwork since discovering it. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Cheers, <BR>Neil Brown <BR>It's hot as h-e-double hockey sticks here at the Jersey Shore &nbsp; <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_75.18c8693c.28a211a6_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: pedalling From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2001 01:07:59 EDT   Hi Neil Brown and list:   I know what most us were taught about correct pedaling, knees together, right? The virtuoso's don't approach pedaling this way. Charles Courboin, one of the smoothest pedalers, and most relaxed in his console motion, says this: "keep the knee directly over the foot that is playing." He = heeled and toed the pedal keyboard, and anticipated pedal moves and shifts ahead of time. Knees together doesn't work out very well at the either extreme of the pedalboard, only in the center portion of it. If slapping = of the pedals is what you are experiencing, it means you are late in = anticipation of the next foot position. That means you must slow down for correct execution and more practice. It also may mean in order to impress, or the adrenaline is pumping, you are playing faster than the brain can comprehend. What is really and ultimately at work here is pride! Nobody wants to be considered a slow old foggy right! So we up the the speed past what our brain faculties can handle, and you are on the leading edge of disaster. Speed is not going to help your technique. it will eventually ruin it. For a while, play it on the safe side with reasonable tempos. = Play well, play safe, and the technical things will work out faster than = forcing it with speed. Work out your pedal moves and mark them on the score. Clean your pedalboard well and see if what I suggest doesn't eliminate the marks from slapping you described.   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Console Motion From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2001 02:06:44 EDT   Dear List:   If some are experiencing pedaling problems such as slapping the keys, the feet must always be in contact with the pedalboard. You walk on them. The hands can get in a habit of slapping the keys too. Cause: Hands too high off the keyboard. The fingers need to be in contact with the keyboard at all times. The hands should be seen to float as the fingers walk across the keys, the wrists being the flexable pivot and the arms moving only as required to get from point A to point B. Staccato chords in succession? only the fingers move while the hand is within range gliding the hand from place to place and always in contact as much as possible with the keys.   A good case in point! Our Chapter had an open workshop with a known world renowned highly skilled teacher. Various members played parts of very difficult pieces. Staccato, fast runs, you name it. A difficult = French Toccata was next and the player was known to have achieved an AAGO certificate while studying with a well known Boston Teacher now deceased. She couldn't handle the passages at all because her hands were too high off the keyboard. She was nervous, and that didn't help and fright and = flight had taken over. She looked at the teacher and the teacher looked at her for a long time. Finally I piped up, "Keep your hands down and you'll be fine!" She did and played that which she couldn't do a moment before perfectly. I knew she knew what to do, but in the heat of the moment forgot. My suggestion calmed her enough that she could perform. Keep the body flexable, not rigid, but don't weave all over the place either. The head = and neck shouldn't bob either. We all at times forget these little things that can grow into small but ever growing disasters. Be calm at the console as if you are enjoying the experience. You really should be enjoying it. You can if you are prepared to play. Catherine Crozier is the ultimate Queen of what I'm talking about.   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: pedalling From: <AMADPoet@aol.com> Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2001 02:36:24 EDT   In a message dated 8/8/01 12:08:53 AM Central Daylight Time, RonSeverin@aol.com writes:   << Knees together doesn't work out very well at the either extreme of the pedalboard, only in the center portion of it. >>   I've been told never to play knees together, though the technique books I = use say you should. What would be the advantage of playing this way? Is it to help stabilize your motions, or get a point of reference of where you are = on the pedals? I tend to feel like I'm floundering on the pedals when I can't =   glance at my feet.   Mandy  
(back) Subject: Re: pedalling From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2001 02:48:11 EDT     --part1_119.2cd4175.28a23aab_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/7/01 11:53:43 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Innkawgneeto@cs.com writes:     > Absolutely, and the super good ones are electrifying to watch (even = without > all that wasted motion), assuming of course one is in view of the > performance. >   And then there are Virgil Fox and Diane Bish, who defy all the rules but still hit all the notes at the right time.   I am occasionally aware of how much effort it takes to redirect my = attention to proper and "seamless" pedalling. but then, that's part of the fun.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_119.2cd4175.28a23aab_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/7/01 11:53:43 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>Innkawgneeto@cs.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Absolutely, and = the super good ones are electrifying to watch (even without <BR>all that wasted motion), assuming of course one is in view of the <BR>performance. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>And then there are Virgil Fox and Diane Bish, who defy all the rules = but <BR>still hit all the notes at the right time. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>I am occasionally aware of how much effort it takes to redirect my = attention <BR>to proper and "seamless" pedalling. &nbsp;&nbsp;but then, that's part = of the fun. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_119.2cd4175.28a23aab_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: pedalling From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2001 03:00:08 EDT     --part1_ba.17ca6352.28a23d78_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/8/01 2:36:56 AM Eastern Daylight Time, = AMADPoet@aol.com writes:     > >In a message dated 8/8/01 12:08:53 AM Central Daylight Time, > RonSeverin@aol.com writes: > > << Knees together doesn't work out very well at the either > extreme of the pedalboard, only in the center portion of it. >> > Well, that's because of those pesky radiating pedalboards!!! icch! ;-)       > I've been told never to play knees together, though the technique books = I > use > say you should. What would be the advantage of playing this way? Is it = to > help stabilize your motions, or get a point of reference of where you = are > on > the pedals? I tend to feel like I'm floundering on the pedals when I = can't > glance at my feet. > The advantage of playing with your knees together is stability of motion = and point of reference. It also keeps your feet from migrating away from a position because your leg is moving. If you feel like you're = floundering, you probably are, but looking at your feet is only going to make it worse. = Practice pedal parts, as well as scales, without looking and with good position, and you will learn to be comfortable aided by increased = attention concentration.   It's so amusing to watch a student playing a pedal part, and at some point =   placing a foot over the proper key. They, for some reason, question if = it is the right key and the foot searches a bit and inevitably finds the = wrong note. practice makes accurate! When you play a wrong note, DON'T = LOOK, move your foot back to the previous note and try again until you get it right, and then practice the movement. It's well worth the effort, not to =   mention it looks so much better that seeing an organist peering down = between their legs as though they have lost their keys!     Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_ba.17ca6352.28a23d78_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/8/01 2:36:56 AM Eastern Daylight Time, AMADPoet@aol.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">&gt;In a message = dated 8/8/01 12:08:53 AM Central Daylight Time, <BR>RonSeverin@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR>&lt;&lt; Knees together doesn't work out very well at the either <BR>extreme of the pedalboard, only in the center portion of it. = &nbsp;&gt;&gt; <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR>Well, that's because of those pesky radiating pedalboards!!! icch! = &nbsp;;-) <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px">I've been told never to play knees together, though the technique = books I <BR>use <BR>say you should. What would be the advantage of playing this way? Is it = to <BR>help stabilize your motions, or get a point of reference of where you = are <BR>on <BR>the pedals? I tend to feel like I'm floundering on the pedals when I = can't <BR>glance at my feet. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">The advantage of playing with your knees = together is stability of motion and <BR>point of reference. &nbsp;It also keeps your feet from migrating away = from a <BR>position because your leg is moving. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;If you feel like you're floundering, <BR>you probably are, but looking at your feet is only going to make it = worse. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>Practice pedal parts, as well as scales, without looking and with good =   <BR>position, and you will learn to be comfortable aided by increased = attention <BR>concentration. <BR> <BR>It's so amusing to watch a student playing a pedal part, and at some = point <BR>placing a foot over the proper key. &nbsp;&nbsp;They, for some reason, = question if it <BR>is the right key and the foot searches a bit and inevitably finds the = wrong <BR>note. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;practice makes accurate! &nbsp;&nbsp;When you = play a wrong note, DON'T LOOK, <BR>move your foot back to the previous note and try again until you get = it <BR>right, and then practice the movement. &nbsp;It's well worth the = effort, not to <BR>mention it looks so much better &nbsp;that seeing an organist peering = down between <BR>their legs as though they have lost their keys! <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_ba.17ca6352.28a23d78_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Crucifixus From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Wed, 08 Aug 2001 02:53:56 -0500     --------------5C086B398CBA3BF156B4536F Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit       AMADPoet@aol.com wrote:   > Hi all- > > I discovered Antonio Lotti (1667-1740) on a King's College cd and was > wondering if his Crucifixus had ever been transcribed for the organ. I = can > just hear the dissonances in that piece on the organ...   I assume that it is the double choir _Crucifixus_ recorded by King's; you = can download a copy of the choral score from the Choral public domain website (<http://cpdl.snaptel.com/cgi-bin/db.cgi?db=3Ddefault&uid=3Ddefault&ID=3D&D= ate=3D&Composer=3DLotti%2C+Antonio&Title=3D&LargeWork=3D&Source=3D&Editor= =3D&Arranger=3D&Opus=3D&OpusNumber=3D&YearPub=3D&TimePeriod=3D---&LinkingUR= L=3D&SheetMusic=3D&SoundFile=3D&SourceFile=3D&Genre=3D---&SubGenre=3D---&La= nguage=3D---&Language2=3D---&NumVoices=3D&Voicing=3D&Instruments=3D&Program= =3D---&SheetFormat=3D---&Copyright=3D---&Notes=3D&keyword=3D&mh=3D50&sb=3D-= --&so=3Dascend&view_records=3DView+Records> no spaces or carriage returns between the '<' and the '>'); an organ transcription would be trivial.   Lotti started his career as an organist at San Marco in Venice, where his predecessors included both Andreas Gabrieli, and Claudio Moneverdi. He = himself was roughly a contemporary of Bach. There is no mention of significant = organ compositions attributed to him, but at San Marco in Venice, the organ was = not a significant solo instrument at the time.   ns   --------------5C086B398CBA3BF156B4536F Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> &nbsp; <p>AMADPoet@aol.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE>Hi all- <p>I discovered Antonio Lotti (1667-1740) on a King's College cd and was <br>wondering if his Crucifixus had ever been transcribed for the organ. I can <br>just hear the dissonances in that piece on the organ...</blockquote> I assume that it is the double choir _Crucifixus<i>_ </i>recorded by = King's; you can download a copy of the choral score from the Choral public domain website (&lt;<A = HREF=3D"http://cpdl.snaptel.com/cgi-bin/db.cgi?db=3Ddefault&uid=3Ddefault&a= mp;amp;ID=3D&amp;amp;Date=3D&amp;amp;Composer=3DLotti%2C+Antonio&amp;amp;Ti= tle=3D&amp;amp;LargeWork=3D&amp;amp;Source=3D&amp;amp;Editor=3D&amp;amp;Arr= anger=3D&amp;amp;Opus=3D&amp;amp;OpusNumber=3D&amp;amp;YearPub=3D&amp;amp;T= imePeriod=3D---&amp;amp;LinkingURL=3D&amp;amp;SheetMusic=3D&amp;amp;SoundFi= le=3D&amp;amp;SourceFile=3D&amp;amp;Genre=3D---&amp;amp;SubGenre=3D---&amp;= amp;Language=3D---&amp;amp;Language2=3D---&amp;amp;NumVoices=3D&amp;amp;Voi= cing=3D&amp;amp;Instruments=3D&amp;amp;Program=3D---&amp;amp;SheetFormat=3D= ---&amp;amp;Copyright=3D---&amp;amp;Notes=3D&amp;amp;keyword=3D&amp;amp;mh= =3D50&amp;amp;sb=3D---&amp;amp;so=3Dascend&amp;amp;view_records=3DView+Reco= rds">http://cpdl.snaptel.com/cgi-bin/db.cgi?db=3Ddefault&amp;uid=3Ddefault&= amp;amp;ID=3D&amp;amp;Date=3D&amp;amp;Composer=3DLotti%2C+Antonio&amp;amp;T= itle=3D&amp;amp;LargeWork=3D&amp;amp;Source=3D&amp;amp;Editor=3D&amp;amp;Ar= ranger=3D&amp;amp;Opus=3D&amp;amp;OpusNumber=3D&amp;amp;YearPub=3D&amp;amp;= TimePeriod=3D---&amp;amp;LinkingU no spaces or carriage returns between the '&lt;' and the '>'); an organ transcription would be trivial. <p>Lotti started his career as an organist at San Marco in Venice, where his predecessors included both Andreas Gabrieli, and Claudio = Moneverdi.&nbsp; He himself was roughly a contemporary of Bach.&nbsp; There is no mention of significant organ compositions attributed to him, but at San Marco in Venice, the organ was not a significant solo instrument at the time. <p>ns</html>   --------------5C086B398CBA3BF156B4536F--    
(back) Subject: Re: Crucifixus From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Wed, 08 Aug 2001 03:07:28 -0500     --------------08116105FAD10339C17DD0D0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I wrote:   > I assume that it is the double choir _Crucifixus_ recorded by King's; > you can download a copy of the choral score from the Choral public > domain website   and tried to post a link directly into the search results. I botched it.   the link to the CPDL website is   <http://cpdl.snaptel.com>   From there you can access the scores, via the search engines...   ns   --------------08116105FAD10339C17DD0D0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> I wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE>I assume that it is the double choir = _Crucifixus<i>_ </i>recorded by King's; you can download a copy of the choral score from the Choral public domain website</blockquote> and tried to post a link directly into the search results.&nbsp; I botched it. <p>the link to the CPDL website is <p>&lt;<A HREF=3D"http://cpdl.snaptel.com">http://cpdl.snaptel.com</A>> <p>From there you can access the scores, via the search engines... <p>ns</html>   --------------08116105FAD10339C17DD0D0--    
(back) Subject: Re: Small churches From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Wed, 08 Aug 2001 16:29:49 +0800   Well I am back from a holiday in the north of this state in a little town of about 10 000 people just south of the Tropic of Capricorn. I played for two church services while there. Congregation " Less than 20. Standard hymns from the Australian Hymn Book. Organ? Yamaha G606 of about 1975(?). By the time I turned off all the gadgets including the 3 or 4 trems all of which were on fullblast the sound was not too bad. 13 pedal notes of course and short manuals. Good for the soul to get back to a church like this. Some of you people playing 5m 200 stop monsters ought to try it some time. The gratitude of the people made it worthwhile. Bob Elms.   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > > Hi Neil Brown and list: > > I know what most us were taught about correct pedaling, knees together, > right? The virtuoso's don't approach pedaling this way. Charles = Courboin, > one of the smoothest pedalers, and most relaxed in his console motion, > says this: "keep the knee directly over the foot that is playing." He = heeled > and toed the pedal keyboard, and anticipated pedal moves and shifts > ahead of time. Knees together doesn't work out very well at the either > extreme of the pedalboard, only in the center portion of it. If slapping = of > the pedals is what you are experiencing, it means you are late in = anticipation > of the next foot position. That means you must slow down for correct > execution and more practice. It also may mean in order to impress, or > the adrenaline is pumping, you are playing faster than the brain can > comprehend. What is really and ultimately at work here is pride! Nobody > wants to be considered a slow old foggy right! So we up the the speed > past what our brain faculties can handle, and you are on the leading = edge > of disaster. Speed is not going to help your technique. it will = eventually > ruin it. For a while, play it on the safe side with reasonable tempos. = Play > well, play safe, and the technical things will work out faster than = forcing > it with speed. Work out your pedal moves and mark them on the score. > Clean your pedalboard well and see if what I suggest doesn't eliminate = the > marks from slapping you described. > > Regards, > > Ron Severin > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE: http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: pedalling From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Wed, 08 Aug 2001 16:34:24 +0800   Strange. I have never been told to keep my knees together when pedalling and I never have done this. Nor have I seen other organists doing it that way. My students all move the knees. They are all young (12 to 18 years). With knees together they would never reach the notes on the extremes of the pedalboard. Bob Elms.   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Hi Neil Brown and list: > I know what most us were taught about correct pedaling, knees together, > right? The virtuoso's don't approach pedaling this way. Charles = Courboin, one of the smoothest pedalers, and most relaxed in his console = motion, says this: "keep the knee directly over the foot that is playing."    
(back) Subject: WurliTzer recitals in West Australia. From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Wed, 08 Aug 2001 16:39:35 +0800   Thought the theatre organ enthusiasts might be interested in the following from a friend in Perth, West Oz::   > As a coincidence last Sunday I went and enjoyed a concert by Ken Double = from Houston, TX on the Karrinyup Wurlitzer. A magnificent machine = especially with all the good work done by Ray and John and their eager > helpers upgrading it to a 3m. Ken really put it throught its paces to a = packed theatre. Not a seat vacant! > > They have regular recitals every month: > For the rest of this year at 2pm on the following Sundays > September 9 Brett Valiant USA > October 10 John Pound - Perth (Northside Music) > November 25 Ray Clements and John Fuhrmann (owners) > Dec 9 Club Christmas party. > Incidentally Karrinyup is a suburb of the City of Perth, our capital city. Population of Perth is 1.2 million. It is the most isolated capital city in the world. Adelaide, the nearest capital is over 1000 miles east of Perth.