PipeChat Digest #2312 - Tuesday, August 14, 2001
 
pitch
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Cleveland Public Hall
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Cleveland Public Hall
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: pitch
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Cleveland Public Hall
  by "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@bayou.com>
Purvis, Dubois and Callahan [x-posted]
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Oragnitis a pipe organ disease
  by <MWORGLBAU@aol.com>
Re: Allegro and Saint Tobias
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Cleveland Skinners and others
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Purvis, Dubois and Callahan [x-posted]
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Cleveland Public Hall
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Purvis, Dubois and Callahan
  by "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com>
19th century pitch/Old St Pat's NYC
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: 19th century pitch/Old St Pat's NYC
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
"The Temple," Cleveland
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: 19th century pitch/Old St Pat's NYC
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Allegro and Saint Tobias
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: pitch From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 17:30:42 -0700     --------------BA8F55EF7DD47A711E5917C6 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   John, I find that odd ... most of the 19th century Koehnken & Grimms around Cincinnati were at A=3D435; the Music Hall Hook/Austin (rebuilt in the teens) was at 435 also ... BIG shock whenever the orchestra played with it (grin) ... they didn't bother to tune down; Old St. Mary's 1928 Austin was at something weird like 438, so the pitch was coming up by then.   The original Skinner at Oberlin was at 435, because GDH didn't repitch the chimes and the harp in the 1950 rebuild.   I thought in general 19th century organ pitch was LOWER, not higher. Could K & G have been a regional and/or a German/American thing?   Cheers,   Bud   "John L. Speller" wrote:   > A pitch approaching A=3D450 would be fairly standard for English or > American pipe organs built in the second half of the nineteenth > century. John Speller > > From: Joe Karashani wrote: > The tuning is quite sharp, about A=3D446 in ET. >   --------------BA8F55EF7DD47A711E5917C6 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> <body bgcolor=3D"#A6CAF0"> John, I find that odd ... most of the 19th century Koehnken &amp; Grimms around Cincinnati were at A=3D435; the Music Hall Hook/Austin (rebuilt in the teens) was at 435 also ... BIG shock whenever the orchestra played with it (grin) ... they didn't bother to tune down; Old St. Mary's 1928 Austin was at something weird like 438, so the pitch was coming up by = then. <p>The original Skinner at Oberlin was at 435, because GDH didn't repitch the chimes and the harp in the 1950 rebuild. <p>I thought in general 19th century organ pitch was LOWER, not higher. Could K &amp; G have been a regional and/or a German/American thing? <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <p>"John L. Speller" wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><style></style> <font face=3D"Arial"><font size=3D-1>A pitch approaching A=3D450 would be fairly standard for English or American pipe organs built in the second half of the nineteenth = century.</font></font>&nbsp;<font face=3D"Arial"><font size=3D-1>John Speller</font></font> <blockquote style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: = 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px"> <div style=3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: = black"><b>From:</b> <a href=3D"mailto:jtkarash@copperNET.zm" = title=3D"jtkarash@copperNET.zm">Joe Karashani</a> <b>wrote:</b></div> <font color=3D"#800000">The tuning is quite sharp, about A=3D446 in = ET.</font></blockquote> </blockquote>   </body> </html>   --------------BA8F55EF7DD47A711E5917C6--    
(back) Subject: Re: Cleveland Public Hall From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 17:52:36 -0700   It's a five-manual E.M. Skinner which was briefly revived in the 1970s = with a replacement console ... the original one, stored under the stage, was destroyed by a leaking fountain at a garden show.   The American Michael Murray was appointed Civic Organist at that time (a post once held by Dr. Edwin Arthur Kraft, late organist of Trinity = Cathedral in Cleveland); but I gather nothing much ever came of that, and the organ sank back into disrepair.   It was never very successful, despite its size. It's in the stage-house between two auditoriums, the enormous Public Hall and the smaller Recital Hall ... tonal egress isn't good, despite Skinner's pleadings with the architects at the time.   I never heard it, but my roommate played it on one of the last occasions = it WAS played ... he said that onstage it was GLORIOUS, particularly the = reeds.   Perhaps now with all the hoopla about the Severance Hall Skinner, interest in the Public Hall Skinner will follow.   Cheers,   Bud   Mike Gettelman wrote:   > Hi everyone, > I posted the following message on Piporg-L a short time ago, and a > suggestion was made that this list might have some people who know this > organ too. So please forgive the unannounced cross-post. > > I read an interesting article in the Cleveland Plain Dealer this > weekend about a large pipe organ that has been quietly residing at the > Cleveland Public Hall, but has not been played regularly since 1950. The > > author said the instrument is 91 years of age. The article gave no name > of builder or specification, but did say it had 10,042 pipes. There was > a picture of the manuals, and there are at least 4 and possibly 5. An > organ tech named George Krejci was named as the person responsible for > the operation of the organ, which was indeed played in June for a > Unitarian Universalists General Assembly this past June. It is said to > need a complete overhaul, but still plays quite nicely despite its > deteriorated condition. > With that information, I wonder if any list members might know this > organ and tell us a little more about it. It sounds like quite a > substantial instrument. > > Thanks > Mike > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Cleveland Public Hall From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 21:33:41 -0400       quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > It's a five-manual E.M. Skinner <Snip>   Bud, you have made my day. Not just an old big organ, but a Skinner! I = just must find my way inside with my camera. It must not be too bad if it = played this year. I wonder if the OHS is aware of this instrument. I shall look into = it further and keep you posted. Thanks so much Bud. You are a wondrous = fountain of organ knowledge.   Cheers Mike    
(back) Subject: Re: pitch From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 20:37:17 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00F2_01C12500.E8782460 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   A=3D3D435 was the norm from about 1910 to 1940 when A=3D3D440 came into = =3D vogue for organs (though it had been an internationally recognized pitch = =3D for some decades before this and organbuilders were about the last =3D people to catch on!) Obviously some builders were ahead of, and some =3D behind, the genaral trend. I recall from the Orpha Ochse book that =3D Austin was one of the earliest companies to adopt A=3D3D435 and =3D subsequently A=3D3D440. Whether A=3D3D435 was a German thing, or whether = =3D Koehnken & Grimm were an unusually early example, I don't know. A =3D higher pitch around A=3D3D450 was certainly the norm in the second half of = =3D the nineteenth century -- at least in the English-speaking world .   John Speller   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   John, I find that odd ... most of the 19th century Koehnken & Grimms =3D around Cincinnati were at A=3D3D435; the Music Hall Hook/Austin (rebuilt = =3D in the teens) was at 435 also ... BIG shock whenever the orchestra =3D played with it (grin) ... they didn't bother to tune down; Old St. =3D Mary's 1928 Austin was at something weird like 438, so the pitch was =3D coming up by then.=3D20 The original Skinner at Oberlin was at 435, because GDH didn't repitch = =3D the chimes and the harp in the 1950 rebuild.=3D20   I thought in general 19th century organ pitch was LOWER, not higher. =3D Could K & G have been a regional and/or a German/American thing?=3D20     ------=3D_NextPart_000_00F2_01C12500.E8782460 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Dwindows-1252" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#a6caf0> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>A=3D3D435 was the norm from about = 1910 to =3D 1940 when=3D20 A=3D3D440 came into vogue for organs (though it had been an =3D internationally=3D20 recognized pitch for some decades before this and organbuilders were =3D about the=3D20 last people to catch on!)&nbsp; Obviously some builders were ahead of, =3D and some=3D20 behind, the genaral trend.&nbsp; I recall from the Orpha Ochse book that = =3D Austin=3D20 was one of the earliest companies to adopt A=3D3D435 and subsequently =3D A=3D3D440. =3D20 Whether A=3D3D435 was a German thing, or whether Koehnken &amp; Grimm were = =3D an=3D20 unusually early example, I don't know.&nbsp; A higher pitch around =3D A=3D3D450 was=3D20 certainly the norm in the second half of the nineteenth century -- at =3D least in=3D20 the English-speaking world <FONT face=3D3D"Times New Roman"=3D20 size=3D3D3>.</FONT></FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>John Speller</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: = =3D 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:quilisma@socal.rr.com"=3D20 title=3D3Dquilisma@socal.rr.com>quilisma@socal.rr.com</A> wrote:</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>John, I find that odd ... most of the 19th century =3D Koehnken=3D20 &amp; Grimms around Cincinnati were at A=3D3D435; the Music Hall =3D Hook/Austin=3D20 (rebuilt in the teens) was at 435 also ... BIG shock whenever the =3D orchestra=3D20 played with it (grin) ... they didn't bother to tune down; Old St. =3D Mary's 1928=3D20 Austin was at something weird like 438, so the pitch was coming up by = =3D then.=3D20 <P>The original Skinner at Oberlin was at 435, because GDH didn't =3D repitch the=3D20 chimes and the harp in the 1950 rebuild.=3D20 <P>I thought in general 19th century organ pitch was LOWER, not =3D higher. Could=3D20 K &amp; G have been a regional and/or a German/American thing?=3D20 </P></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00F2_01C12500.E8782460--    
(back) Subject: Re: Cleveland Public Hall From: "Sand Lawn" <sandlawn@bayou.com> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 20:47:17 -0500   Cleveland Auditorium ....   E.M.Skinner, Opus 328 1921 5m, Gr, Sw, Ch. So, Str. Ech, Ped 147 st, 117 rg. 150 rk, 9965 pp Opening recital by Edwin Arthur Kraft on Sept. 10, 1922; extant; = temporary Klann console in 1971; some restorative work by Joseph Nagle in the mid 1970's; = original console in storage; metal pipes of Echo stolen by May, 1990.   This are the facts as I know them.   Sand Lawn        
(back) Subject: Purvis, Dubois and Callahan [x-posted] From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 21:15:43 -0500   Some dates for these guys are coming up, and I have questions:   (1) Has anyone recorded Dubois' Fiat Lux? I've played it through, but = have never heard it done.   (2) Does anyone have any favorite Purvis music suitable for service? I've played the first two movements from the Four Prayers in Tone, no longer in print (again I've never heard anyone do this music), and bought the only volume of his that I've found in print. It has mainly Christmas music, so I'm looking for suggestions.   (3) What is your favorite Charles Callahan piece suitable for prelude, communion or postlude?   Thanks,   Glenda Sutton              
(back) Subject: Re: Oragnitis a pipe organ disease From: <MWORGLBAU@aol.com> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 23:06:10 EDT   Dear Ron and list,   "Many of us were born with an incurrable disease called Organitis."   God, I haven't heard this term used in I don't know when. I was first =   accused of having this disease by my 5th grade teacher, Mrs. Freed. A real =   mean spirited woman that could not stand that I, or any one else, was so enthusiastic about anything. She hated the fact that I loved pipe organs = so much. She told me, in front of the entire class, that I had "organitis", trying to embarrass me in front of the class, and to get me to shut up = about pipe organs. As you can see, 31 years later, the disease is still running = its course. And if it is of any consolation, I drove her so crazy that she retired at the end of the school year that I had her. Thanks for bring up = a wonderful memory :-)!     Michael R. Williamson Williamson-Warne & Associates Hollywood Ca.  
(back) Subject: Re: Allegro and Saint Tobias From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 23:11:44 -0400   on 8/14/01 11:03 PM, Paul R. Swank at prswank@surfbest.net wrote:   > I'll try again, it works for me. > > It brings up the ArchConfraternity of the Misericordia which has as one = of > its patron saints, Saint Tobias. > > > <http://www.mega.it/eng/egui/monu/bud.htm> > Thanks! This time I was able to get it. Very curious.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Cleveland Skinners and others From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 20:25:13 -0700   Oh, OHS is very MUCH aware of it ... it's one of several Skinners in = Cleveland listed as "endangered" ... I understand that Trinity Cathedral is gone, = except for the windchests and a few pedal pipes; Emmanuel Episcopal, which was the pro-cathedral before Trinity was built, has a Skinner that lost its = console in a fire many years ago ... there was SOME water damage to the organ itself, = but I understand it's still in restorable condition ... the church has had a = Hammond Concert Model for as long as I can remember, and I remember the place from = the early 1960s. Then there's a Christian Science church, but I don't know anything = about that one. St. Thomas Aquinas RC on Superior Ave had a three-manual Skinner, = which I understand was saved when the church was torn down, but I don't know where = it went. Church of the Holy Oil-Can, so called because that's what it LOOKS like (Epworth-Euclid Methodist) has (or had) a Skinner rebuilt by Holtkamp; I = don't know if it's still there.   The Temple on University Circle HAD an enormous Kimball (I think it was) = ... Sebastian Gluck was looking for information about that one ... but I think = it's been rebuilt and altered so much that there's not much Kimball left. At the = time I played it, it still had the old Kimball console, which had been altered for a = one-legged organist ... an additional set of expression shoes and controls had been = added at the bass end of the pedal-board, sticking out at an angle on a little = shelf.   The RC Cathedral is a fine large early Holtkamp, east and west-end organs = with duplicate consoles ... I have no idea if they play it, or if they have any = kind of music program these days. In my day, the organist was also organist of the = Stadium and the Arena, and he DIDN'T change styles when he came to play at St. = John's ... needless to say, he WASN'T playing Gregorian Chants at the Stadium (grin) = ... every time we went to Mass there, somebody would whisper, "Let's All SKATE!" = (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Mike Gettelman wrote:   > quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > > It's a five-manual E.M. Skinner <Snip> > > Bud, you have made my day. Not just an old big organ, but a Skinner! = I just > must find my way inside with my camera. It must not be too bad if it = played this > year. I wonder if the OHS is aware of this instrument. I shall look into = it > further and keep you posted. Thanks so much Bud. You are a wondrous = fountain of > organ knowledge. > > Cheers > Mike > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Purvis, Dubois and Callahan [x-posted] From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 23:23:40 -0400   on 8/14/01 10:15 PM, Glenda at gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com wrote:   > > > (2) Does anyone have any favorite Purvis music suitable for service? = I've > played the first two movements from the Four Prayers in Tone, no longer = in > print (again I've never heard anyone do this music), and bought the only > volume of his that I've found in print. It has mainly Christmas music, = so > I'm looking for suggestions. > >   I like his "7 Chorale Preludes on Tunes Found in American Hymnals", publ. Carl Fischer. Includes: Ton-y-Botel, Forest Green, Liebster Jesu, = Austria, Tallis' Canon, Manna [Mercy], In Babilone. I'm playing the one on Tallis' Canon for Offertory this Sunday. From "Four Dubious Conceits" the "Cantilena" makes a nice offertory (if your pew-sitters aren't too strait-laced). According to John Henderson, Purvis lied at least twice about his age, if not his birthday. Henderson: "Purvis sometimes himself used both 1915 and 1917 as his birthyear. 1913 is definitely correct."       Callahan's written some exceedingly lovely things. Aria, in particular.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Cleveland Public Hall From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 23:21:31 -0400   This organ is listed as originally E. M. Skinner 1921 Opus 328 5 manual, restored 1976 by Joseph Nagle, little used, has OHS Historic Plaque No. = 81. Echo metal pipes stolen 1990, original console in storage, temporary = Klann console 1971. Taken from OHS Skinner/Aeolian Skinner Opus list compiled by Allen Kinzey and Sand Lawn. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Re: Purvis, Dubois and Callahan From: "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 23:56:10 -0400   Dear Glenda and Pipechatters,   (3) What is your favorite Charles Callahan piece suitable for prelude, communion or postlude?   Callahan has written a marvelous setting of "Simple Gifts" for piano and organ duet. The pianist has the more difficult part, if I remember correctly. It was several years ago that a USMA Concert Band member and I played it at the Post Chapel.   For organ solo, I enjoy playing Callahan's "Voluntary on "Engelberg". That one requires some careful practice and registration.   Both are published by Morning Star.   Regards to all,   Pat Maimone in the slightly cooler, much more comfortable Hudson Valley Post Chapel West Point, NY III/57 hybrid ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.  
(back) Subject: 19th century pitch/Old St Pat's NYC From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Aug 2001 00:02:19 EDT   Dear Pipechatters:   I am in concurrence with John Speller on the late 19th century pitch of = 450. The three-manual Henry Erben organ in the gallery of Old Saint Patrick's Cathedral in New York City, dating from 1868, clearly has the unaltered pipework speaking with relaxed and eloquent grandeur at this "high" pitch. = A reader on another list informed me that this was common pitch for European =   opera companies during the second half of the 19th century.   To the many of you who have enquired about this organ privately, I should state that we are only engaged in research, study, and documentation of = the organ at this point. There have been many historical interventions with = the organ, but principally on the mechanical end of things. One of the difficulties in the research process is that all documentation regarding = the instrument, its 19th century alterations, and some rather drastic measures =   taken in the 20th century, has "disappeared" from the Cathedral's = archives.   While restoration is certainly the goal of the Cathedral, these first = couple of years are going to be dedicated to study and documentation, letting the =   organ tell us about itself. Ongoing conservation efforts keep the = instrument playing as part of Parish life as we study this masterpiece, trying to = piece together the trail of what was done to it, what must be UN-done, and to = what point in its history it is to be restored (there was one episode of tonal change very shortly after the organ was built).   Almost all of the components of the elaborate offset crankshaft = triple-feeder double-rise winding system have been recovered from various parts of the Cathedral compound, and are being catalogued and evaluated for the = possible reintroduction of the manually-winded option.   Current trends in musical instrument restorations involve much more preliminary research and documentation before launching into the act of restoration. Research and documentation present little chance of damage = or erasing historical clues, whereas overly-restored, or hastily restored instruments obliterate many of the clues that teach us how organs were = built. As John Watson, Curator and Conservator of Musical Instruments at = Colonial Williamsburg says, "The examination and documentation of any musical instrument can amount to an apprenticeship with that builder." Looking = for tool marks, saw patters, the direction in which the glue drips run, all = tell us how they were made, and in what order parts were assembled.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: 19th century pitch/Old St Pat's NYC From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Wed, 15 Aug 2001 00:05:04 EDT     --part1_68.12be2a1f.28ab4ef0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Not meaning to sound dumb or anything, but where is Old St. Pat's in = relation to the present Cathedral?   Neil Brown     --part1_68.12be2a1f.28ab4ef0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>Not meaning to sound dumb or anything, but where is Old St. Pat's = in relation <BR>to the present Cathedral? <BR> <BR>Neil Brown <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_68.12be2a1f.28ab4ef0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: "The Temple," Cleveland From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Aug 2001 00:20:28 EDT   Dear Pipechatters:   Bud is correct, I did have the opportunity to inspect and document, as = much as possible within the limited time I had, the large four manual 1924 = Kimball organ, opus 6739, in what is affectionately known as "The Temple" in Cleveland. The building is rarely used now, as the congregation built a modern facility in the suburbs, and the seven-sided domed structure is = used only for great cermonial occasions and the High Holy Days.   Designed by Carlton H. Bullis as a large concert unit organ, its 37 ranks = and Deagan 61-note Celesta are all enclosed in expression chambers, and it originally possessed a magnificent four-manual horseshoe console. Sadly, that console is now gone, the organ has been reduced to three manuals, and =   rather re-specified. The new keydesk is a bit of a plywood cigar box = butcher job, unfortunately. If there is sufficient interest, and I have the time, = I can try to post the original specifications, as well as the extended = stoplist.   One of my favorite oddball features of this organ is the triangular = 12-note offset chest, which is home to the 16' octave of the 85-pipe Swell Oboe = Horn unit. The chest plan is triangular, and the pipes are planted as if they were billiard balls racked in a frame. Although wedged into that tiny bit = of odd corner space in the wierdest recesses of the chamber, the tuning iron still reaches each and every tuning wire.   As I continue to work on my book, "The History of the Pipe Organ in the American Synagogue," I welcome any and all documentary material on this subject. Stoplists, photographs, original contracts, any information possible, of organs extant and extinct, is much appreciated, and the costs = of getting those materials to our archives will be reimbursed.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: 19th century pitch/Old St Pat's NYC From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Aug 2001 00:25:12 EDT   Hi List:   I'm also fascinated by the 1880 George Jardine pictured in Organist's Book of Days for January 6-10. It was the first organ in the new Cathedral Of St. Patrick. Are there any others like it? or was it one of a kind? St. George's Episcopal was similar in NY I was told. This organ had party horns before they ever got popular. What ever happened to it?   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Allegro and Saint Tobias From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Aug 2001 00:45:27 EDT     --part1_133.9b61.28ab5867_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/14/01 5:54:55 PM Eastern Daylight Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:     > > The computer and the Internet are amazing things, but also very = powerful. > > > > There is a Saint Tobias listed as the alternate patron saint (with = Saint > > Sebastian) of a very strange group of Italians. > > > > Read down into the text at: > > > > <http://www.mega.it/eng/equi/monu/bud.htm> > > Are you sure that's the right address? I tried it but couldn't get it = to > work. > > I did find mention of a Saint Tobias at > http://www.themiracleofstjoseph.org/revs/r000417a.htm > but only in the title, nothing in the body of the text. > >   I did a little on-line research, and it led me to the Book of Tobit, in = the Apocrypha of the Bible, which is not included in many printings. (The Apocrypha is where the story of the Maccabees is found as well.) Tobit, indeed, was blinded.   Tobias is the son of Tobit, and he was assisted by the Archangel Raphael, = who help arrange his marriage and helped Tobias cure his father's blindness. = In return, Tobias led a faithful and good life, praising God.   Vicki   --part1_133.9b61.28ab5867_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D"#000080" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D"Calligraph421 BT" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated = 8/14/01 5:54:55 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>runyonr@muohio.edu writes: <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">&gt; The computer = and the Internet are amazing things, but also very powerful. <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; There is a Saint Tobias listed as the alternate patron saint = (with Saint <BR>&gt; Sebastian) of a very strange group of Italians. <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Read down into the text at: <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; &lt;http://www.mega.it/eng/equi/monu/bud.htm&gt; <BR> <BR>Are you sure that's the right address? &nbsp;I tried it but couldn't = get it to <BR>work. <BR> <BR>I did find mention of a Saint Tobias at <BR>http://www.themiracleofstjoseph.org/revs/r000417a.htm <BR>but only in the title, nothing in the body of the text. <BR> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000080" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SCRIPT" = FACE=3D"Calligraph421 BT" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I did a little on-line research, and it led me to the Book of Tobit, = in the <BR>Apocrypha of the Bible, which is not included in many printings. = &nbsp;(The <BR>Apocrypha is where the story of the Maccabees is found as well.) = &nbsp;Tobit, <BR>indeed, was blinded. <BR> <BR>Tobias is the son of Tobit, and he was assisted by the Archangel = Raphael, who <BR>help arrange his marriage and helped Tobias cure his father's = blindness. &nbsp;In <BR>return, Tobias led a faithful and good life, praising God. <BR> <BR>Vicki</FONT></HTML>   --part1_133.9b61.28ab5867_boundary--