PipeChat Digest #2321 - Friday, August 17, 2001
 
Re: Allegro  part 8 & End
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
RE:on the Jackel and pitches (way to go Bruce)
  by "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net>
RE: on the Jackel and pitches (way to go Bruce)
  by "Barry H Bodie" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net>
Re: screaming mixtures
  by "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net>
RE: Utah Organ In A Barn
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
RE: Allegro - part 8
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: on the Jackel and pitches (way to go Bruce)
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: screaming mixtures
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Holtkamp
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Holtkamp
  by "Barry H Bodie" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net>
Re: Holtkamp
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Mixtures to scream or not to scream
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
wanted: violin, gamba pipes to complete rank
  by <homerat@mindspring.com>
RE: Utah Organ In A Barn
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Allegro part 8 & End From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 07:12:07 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000B_01C126EB.EC8B3280 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Susan Howatch writes fabulous novels (never knew Anglican priests =3D thought so much about sex!), but not many organs (the kind of which we =3D discuss on this list) abound in them.   Glenda Sutton   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000B_01C126EB.EC8B3280 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Susan Howatch writes&nbsp;fabulous = =3D novels (never=3D20 knew Anglican priests thought so much about sex!), but not many organs =3D (the kind=3D20 of which we discuss on this list) abound in them.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Glenda =3D Sutton</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000B_01C126EB.EC8B3280--    
(back) Subject: RE:on the Jackel and pitches (way to go Bruce) From: "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 09:05:52 -0400     Bruce is right on the money!   In response to this: Snip... Personally, I'd like to see a late English Romantic concert instrument or perhaps one of the many languishing historical American municipal organs in place of this pseudo-Baroque pretender from a high-priced "boutique" builder. snip......   I think the fact that you said "personally" says it all. That's one = person's opinion. I for one, knowing what I know now from having had a = really good organ professor, would not want some organ that was designed to play transcriptions or symphonic music. (unless that's = what I wanted to play)   How will one ever understand the historical perspective or the organ = without an instrument that tries to represent what period builders were = doing. The fact is, these do organs do not play baroque music well. They lack the "specific color" intended by the composers, = especially for improvisations.   Enough said on this, I believe we all have opinions and the logic here is = I would love to go to that school, or Kansas, or Oberlin, or Duke, or PLU. = If I wanted to play and focus on romantic and symphonic literature, I could go to Yale or some school that had an organ = do to the that specific job.   It's really kind of like cars.... If you buy a high end sports car or = roadster, you can't throw the entire family and luggage in there and go, = you need an all purpose vehicle like a station wagon or full sized car. How ever, if you want to be serious about what you're = doing, take what's designed to do the job!   As to pitches and temperaments. I never appreciated the Flentrop I was = playing (whoops... bad word for some of you) until I was able to hear = temperaments in comparison. This was on a Digital Eminent Organ.   Wow.... you would not believe the difference in the music. Play = something like the Buxtehude F major in equal temperament and then set it = to Werkmeister or Volotti. Listen to the music light up! The mixtures are what really come alive as the organ sings in more perfect = tune.   Then for a reality check start playing full triads and go up in half steps = and listen as the music in more the 2 sharps or flats is incredible out of = tune.   Here again it all has it's place. You would not expect an romantic organ = in unequal temperament (or slightly out of tune everywhere), and Baroque = music is just the opposite. It was written in certain keys for color, d minor for example is a big hit in unequal temperament. = It's very dark!   Way to go Bruce... keep up the good work on enlightening people who have = never tasted the grass on the other side of the fence!   Wayne Grauel    
(back) Subject: RE: on the Jackel and pitches (way to go Bruce) From: "Barry H Bodie" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 09:39:50 -0400   I suppose it is all a matter of personal taste. I am enamoured by English Romantic organ music as much a result of heritage and pedagogical background as anything else. My most influential teachers were English musicians and my most memorable organ experiences were with English organs. As a result, this is my preferred period of music and what I enjoy playing the most. I am not a professional musician - obviously. I can understand the logic in the arguments of Bruce and the others. Unfortunately, the instrument in question was designed without benefit of the organist who would be using it for teaching and performance. I hope the college can find an organ professor to start a wonderful program around the instrument.   Just as you have said, we all chose where we want to train. I spent six years in sunny Cleveland enduring a multitude of Holtkamps and butchered Skinners as well as an equivocal installation by Flentrop, because I wanted to train in urology at the best institution available to me - the Cleveland Clinic. My training served me well throughout my career in academic urology and made it possible for me to become "semi-retired" at an early age in a lovely and very cosmopolitan community and able to spend time with my favourite hobby - pipe organs.     Barry H. Bodie, MD, FACS Western Carolina Urological Associates Brevard, NC bbodie@infoave.net -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Wayne Grauel Sent: Friday, August 17, 2001 9:06 AM To: PipeChat Subject: RE:on the Jackel and pitches (way to go Bruce)     Bruce is right on the money!   In response to this: Snip... Personally, I'd like to see a late English Romantic concert instrument or perhaps one of the many languishing historical American municipal organs in place of this pseudo-Baroque pretender from a high-priced "boutique" builder. snip......   I think the fact that you said "personally" says it all. That's one person's opinion. I for one, knowing what I know now from having had a really good organ professor, would not want some organ that was designed to play transcriptions or symphonic music. (unless that's what I wanted to play)   How will one ever understand the historical perspective or the organ without an instrument that tries to represent what period builders were doing. The fact is, these do organs do not play baroque music well. They lack the "specific color" intended by the composers, especially for improvisations.   Enough said on this, I believe we all have opinions and the logic here is I would love to go to that school, or Kansas, or Oberlin, or Duke, or PLU. If I wanted to play and focus on romantic and symphonic literature, I could go to Yale or some school that had an organ do to the that specific job.   It's really kind of like cars.... If you buy a high end sports car or roadster, you can't throw the entire family and luggage in there and go, you need an all purpose vehicle like a station wagon or full sized car. How ever, if you want to be serious about what you're doing, take what's designed to do the job!   As to pitches and temperaments. I never appreciated the Flentrop I was playing (whoops... bad word for some of you) until I was able to hear temperaments in comparison. This was on a Digital Eminent Organ.   Wow.... you would not believe the difference in the music. Play something like the Buxtehude F major in equal temperament and then set it to Werkmeister or Volotti. Listen to the music light up! The mixtures are what really come alive as the organ sings in more perfect tune.   Then for a reality check start playing full triads and go up in half steps and listen as the music in more the 2 sharps or flats is incredible out of tune.   Here again it all has it's place. You would not expect an romantic organ in unequal temperament (or slightly out of tune everywhere), and Baroque music is just the opposite. It was written in certain keys for color, d minor for example is a big hit in unequal temperament. It's very dark!   Way to go Bruce... keep up the good work on enlightening people who have never tasted the grass on the other side of the fence!   Wayne Grauel     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: screaming mixtures From: "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 09:49:34 -0400   > Ron said: > > Also:- The point I am making is that if mixtures "scream" it is not the > fault > of the temperament, it is bad design or bad voicing. >   Ron, absolutely, in fact unequal temperament will make the mixtures sing = (if you're in the right key). To build on your points... the problem with the screaming mixtures is poor design, voicing, or = both... Period! take your typical 1940's organ that has had some upper work done on a = rebuild. or... many other EP organs for that matter... where are the mixtures... = sitting out in the flower box so everyone can see the pretty little pipes! = Yikes... how is that going to sound...   Why do trackers have the mixtures buried back in the case behind the = principals. The mixtures get a chance to blend with the organ. Of course = we want the mixtures to have body, but the typical american organ (meaning the stereotypical do all, play nothing = well, design) have mixtures that are put in the wrong place, voiced = improperly so they are way too loud, and /or of the wrong pitch... meaning way too high. How many organs out = there have mixtures higher than 2' on the great. There's a big part of = the problem!   Mixtures should add body and bite to the principal chorus, and in a good = organ you'll hear the vowels come through in the voicing.   Wayne    
(back) Subject: RE: Utah Organ In A Barn From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 09:02:59 -0500   Nitpick: When the A-S was there it was still Philharmonic Hall.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: John Cormack [mailto:jcorm@bellatlantic.net] Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2001 5:35 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Utah Organ In A Barn     The organ from Avery Fisher Hall is still in the Crystal Cathedral, only = the console is in the barn.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2001 8:58 AM Subject: RE: Utah Organ In A Barn     > > > Here's a link to an article in the Salt Lake Tribune about a Utah farmer who > > has built an organ in his barn. > > http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=3D/news/archive/2001/08/13/s= tat > e1642EDT7314.DTL > > David Carter > Sacramento > > What a wonderful story. Too bad there aren't any photos. And I've always > wondered what happened to the organ that was doomed at Philhamonic Hall. Now > I know. I bet his cows give great milk. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Allegro - part 8 From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 09:11:07 -0500   Coming to a theater near you.... :-)   -----Original Message----- From: Claire [mailto:fleahopper@earthlink.net] Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2001 8:00 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Allegro - part 8     It's over :(   When does the next one start??   Claire     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: on the Jackel and pitches (way to go Bruce) From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 22:06:21 +0800   I am not sure what Wayne was on about. Having no word wrap made things even more difficult to follow. B.E.   Wayne Grauel wrote: > >    
(back) Subject: Re: screaming mixtures From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 22:19:25 +0800   Well Wayne, I was labouring under the impression that the mixtures were situated according to where the tuner had to stand to do his job. If the organ is tuned from the front of the section the mixtures are in the front. Try tuning upperwork which is buried behind an 8' rank.It happens in an organ we tune here and removing pipeowrk to get to the upperwork is not a good way of doing things. it also wastes time waiting till the removed and replaced pipework cools off again. Wayne please check your wordwrap. You are hard to read.   Wayne Grauel wrote: > take your typical 1940's organ that has had some upper work done on a = rebuild. or... many other EP organs for that matter... where are the = mixtures... sitting out in the flower box so everyone can see the pretty = little pipes! Yikes... how is that going to sound... > Why do trackers have the mixtures buried back in the case behind the = principals. The mixtures get a chance to blend with the organ.    
(back) Subject: Holtkamp From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 07:44:08 -0700       Barry H Bodie wrote:   > Just as you have said, we all chose where we want to train. I spent six > years in sunny Cleveland enduring a multitude of Holtkamps and butchered > Skinners as well as an equivocal installation by Flentrop, because I > wanted to train in urology at the best institution available to me - the > Cleveland Clinic.   I'd have to take issue with "enduring" the Holtkamps, Barry ... I was in = the Cleveland area from 1962-1970, and I went exploring .. Cleveland is a virtual living museum of the evolution of Holtkamp's style, from Old St. Joseph's (now gone) romantic/symphonic, to St. Philomena's RC in East Cleveland ... very soft and Italianate ... that was Holtkamp's first = church rueckpositiv, which David Dunkle had restored in the 1980s, to St. John's Cathedral (DEFINITE French accent), to St. James on 55th Street (VERY = early and VERY eclectic), and the Lutheran church (I forget the name ... St. Paul's?) further down 55th Street, which is probably the first statement = of his mature style, to St. Paul's Cleveland Heights (the Holtkamp family church), which *I* think is a WONDERFUL organ.   There was a positively SINGING little 2m Holtkamp in one of the halls or chapels at Case/Western Reserve, but I don't remember which one.   St. John's, Covington KY was a milestone in American organ-building ... somebody compared it to an unfinished Michaelangelo marble.   Holtkamp under Chick went off in several new directions, one of them being the magnificent encased FRENCH tracker in La Mesa Methodist in San Diego.   I don't think Chick can be blamed for the less-that-successful instrument = in new Warner Concert Hall at Oberlin (since replaced by the yawn/bore Flentrop) ... for one thing, his father died while it was under = construction (it might not have been past the design stage ... I don't remember ... didn't Walter Holtkamp Sr. die in 1962?) ... Chick found himself doing a MAJOR organ for a MAJOR center of organ study as one of his first instruments, if not THE first ... Chris Holtkamp tells me that it's MUCH more successful in its subsequent home in Texas, as they built the room specifically for it ... Warner Hall is not particularly kind to organ = music.   I think CHRIS Holtkamp is prepared to build in a VARIETY of styles ... the fashions of his grandfather's day have passed, and he knows it. I had = great fun visiting with him when he was in southern California, as I also knew a few of his GREAT-grandfather's organs, a few of which survive in RC churches, mostly in northern Ohio. He's doing some research on those as Holtkamp prepares to celebrate their 150th anniversary.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: Holtkamp From: "Barry H Bodie" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 11:01:21 -0400   Bud:   As usual, you are correct. My personal tastes drift towards the Romantic instrument, but I do have an appreciation for other periods of organ building as well. Indeed, most of the Holtkamps that I played were of the "screaming Martini" variety, ill suited for service playing and performance of a considerable amount of organ repertoire. One such instrument is a totally unenclosed instrument on very low wind pressure in an Episcopal church in Lakewood - totally inappropriate for its location and purpose. This instrument was the product of a very unfortunate turn in American organ building, but a fine product which is likely to last the church for years to come.   One of the more interesting and successful organs I have seen of late is a Holtkamp in a Presbyterian Church in Greenville, SC. Its specification is at total odds with most of the other Holtkamps I have played. There is even a high-pressure reed included on the choir organ. I agree that the company under Chris's supervision is undergoing a renaissance. They have always built fine instruments, though not always to my personal musical tastes, and are likely to continue to do so in the future. Isn't it funny how things change over time? Personally, I never would have thought Holtkamp would have built such an instrument, but I am pleased that they did.   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of quilisma@socal.rr.com Sent: Friday, August 17, 2001 10:44 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Holtkamp       Barry H Bodie wrote:   > Just as you have said, we all chose where we want to train. I spent six > years in sunny Cleveland enduring a multitude of Holtkamps and butchered > Skinners as well as an equivocal installation by Flentrop, because I > wanted to train in urology at the best institution available to me - the > Cleveland Clinic.   I'd have to take issue with "enduring" the Holtkamps, Barry ... I was in the Cleveland area from 1962-1970, and I went exploring .. Cleveland is a virtual living museum of the evolution of Holtkamp's style, from Old St. Joseph's (now gone) romantic/symphonic, to St. Philomena's RC in East Cleveland ... very soft and Italianate ... that was Holtkamp's first church rueckpositiv, which David Dunkle had restored in the 1980s, to St. John's Cathedral (DEFINITE French accent), to St. James on 55th Street (VERY early and VERY eclectic), and the Lutheran church (I forget the name ... St. Paul's?) further down 55th Street, which is probably the first statement of his mature style, to St. Paul's Cleveland Heights (the Holtkamp family church), which *I* think is a WONDERFUL organ.   There was a positively SINGING little 2m Holtkamp in one of the halls or chapels at Case/Western Reserve, but I don't remember which one.   St. John's, Covington KY was a milestone in American organ-building ... somebody compared it to an unfinished Michaelangelo marble.   Holtkamp under Chick went off in several new directions, one of them being the magnificent encased FRENCH tracker in La Mesa Methodist in San Diego.   I don't think Chick can be blamed for the less-that-successful instrument in new Warner Concert Hall at Oberlin (since replaced by the yawn/bore Flentrop) ... for one thing, his father died while it was under construction (it might not have been past the design stage ... I don't remember ... didn't Walter Holtkamp Sr. die in 1962?) ... Chick found himself doing a MAJOR organ for a MAJOR center of organ study as one of his first instruments, if not THE first ... Chris Holtkamp tells me that it's MUCH more successful in its subsequent home in Texas, as they built the room specifically for it ... Warner Hall is not particularly kind to organ music.   I think CHRIS Holtkamp is prepared to build in a VARIETY of styles ... the fashions of his grandfather's day have passed, and he knows it. I had great fun visiting with him when he was in southern California, as I also knew a few of his GREAT-grandfather's organs, a few of which survive in RC churches, mostly in northern Ohio. He's doing some research on those as Holtkamp prepares to celebrate their 150th anniversary.   Cheers,   Bud     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Holtkamp From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 08:35:55 -0700       Barry H Bodie wrote:   > Bud: > > As usual, you are correct.   Aw shucks (shuffle, blush, grin)...   > My personal tastes drift towards the Romantic > instrument, but I do have an appreciation for other periods of organ > building as well. Indeed, most of the Holtkamps that I played were of > the "screaming Martini" variety, ill suited for service playing and > performance of a considerable amount of organ repertoire. One such > instrument is a totally unenclosed instrument on very low wind pressure > in an Episcopal church in Lakewood - totally inappropriate for its > location and purpose. This instrument was the product of a very > unfortunate turn in American organ building, but a fine product which is > likely to last the church for years to come. >   St. Peter's Lakewood was the brain-child of Fenner Douglass, who, as far = as we could tell, had little liking for ANYTHING Episcopal, high OR low (he often made fun of us for going to St. James for High Mass) ...he basically had that organ built so he could try out his research which later resulted in "The Language of the French Classical Organ". I've never heard it; I understand it's not successful, even of type; but don't blame HOLTKAMP for THAT (chuckle). Fenner designed it; blame HIM (evil grin).   I can't imagine a MORE inappropriate organ in a "low" Episcopal church. = The Flentrop he designed for Christ Church, Oberlin is SOMEWHAT better, I = guess, but it's still all-unenclosed.   I'm always struck by contrasts ... at Eastman, ALL the organ students who weren't otherwise engaged on Sunday morning could usually be found in the pews of St. Paul's (?), where Craighead played a WONDERFUL *untouched* = E.M. Skinner, which he INSISTED they preserve intact.   At Oberlin, I don't think it EVER occurred to ANYBODY to go hear Douglass play a service ... they KNEW what they'd hear (evil grin).   Nor was "service-playing" in his teaching vocabulary ... THAT we mostly = got from bull-sessions with John Gordon Morris, who had studied with Dr. = Thomas Matthews, and from pilgrimages to St. Paul's Cleveland Heights during the reign of Walter Blodgett.   One point I neglected in my earlier message: unpleasant though some = Holtkamp "Martinis" WERE, Holtkamp's clean, crisp action and speech produced a = whole generation of organists from places like Oberlin and Syracuse (at the time Oberlin's "graduate annex") who PLAYED that way: clean and crisp ... Larry Cortner, David Britton, John Gordon Morris, Bill Porter, and an AWFUL lot = of people whose names I've forgotten over the years. The clarity of Holtkamp organs and actions really DID revolutionize the way people played back in the 1950s and 1960s.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: Mixtures to scream or not to scream From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 11:45:03 -0400   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C12733.94C41BA0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   No, excellent teeth that don't decay, however very bad gums that like to recede. -----Original Message----- From: Cremona502@cs.com [mailto:Cremona502@cs.com] Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2001 9:25 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Mixtures to scream or not to scream     In a message dated 8/16/01 3:58:04 PM Eastern Daylight Time, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org writes:         Could we use another term, at least for a while. I've lost 1/2 of the upperwork in my mouth that I'm all too sensitive to that word right now.         Oh dear! Rough vestry meeting???? ;-)   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C12733.94C41BA0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D"text/html; = charset=3Diso-8859-1">     <META content=3D"MSHTML 5.50.4522.1800" name=3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><SPAN class=3D875184415-17082001><FONT face=3DGaramond = color=3D#800000>No, excellent teeth that don't decay, however&nbsp;very bad gums that like to recede.</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D875184415-17082001><FONT face=3DGaramond color=3D#800000></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV class=3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3Dltr align=3Dleft><FONT = face=3DTahoma size=3D2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> Cremona502@cs.com [mailto:Cremona502@cs.com]<BR><B>Sent:</B> Thursday, August 16, 2001 9:25 PM<BR><B>To:</B> pipechat@pipechat.org<BR><B>Subject:</B> Re: Mixtures to = scream or not to scream<BR><BR></FONT></DIV><FONT face=3Darial,helvetica><FONT = size=3D2>In a message dated 8/16/01 3:58:04 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org writes: <BR><BR><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px = solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px" TYPE=3D"CITE">Could we use another term, at least for a while. I've lost = 1/2 of the <BR>upperwork in my mouth that I'm all too sensitive to that word = right now. <BR></FONT><FONT lang=3D0 face=3DArial color=3D#000000 size=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR></FONT><FONT lang=3D0 face=3DArial = color=3D#000000 size=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF"><BR>Oh dear! &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Rough vestry meeting???? &nbsp;&nbsp;;-) <BR><BR>Bruce Cornely = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's = Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, = and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT> = </FONT></BODY></HTML>   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C12733.94C41BA0--  
(back) Subject: wanted: violin, gamba pipes to complete rank From: <homerat@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 09:05:11 -0700   Looking for metal string pipes (violin, gamba). 8 foot pitch, 4-4 1/2" wp. Need only the following pipes to complete rank: First C below middle C, = C#, D, D#, E. Located in California. Shipping is fine.   Thanks, Kelly and Stephen Goodman  
(back) Subject: RE: Utah Organ In A Barn From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 14:03:55 -0400   Thank. I had seen someone else posted that. I wonder how those things get separated. Just curious. But no one's replied as to the quality of the = cows' milk!   The organ from Avery Fisher Hall is still in the Crystal Cathedral, only = the console is in the barn. Philhamonic Hall. Now > I know. I bet his cows give great milk.