PipeChat Digest #2328 - Sunday, August 19, 2001
 
Re: Gravissiama
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Resultants: both flues and reeds considered
  by "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Inharmonicity of some builders' 32' reeds
  by "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net>
RE: Allegro - part 8
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Allegro
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: Inharmonicity of some builders' 32' reeds
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
64 footers etc.
  by <Doppelflote8@aol.com>
Re: 64 footers etc.
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Pipe "planting" problems
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Allegro
  by "Mandy Glass" <amadpoet@lycos.com>
Re: good and bad from ALL builders
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Sunday Within the Octave of St. Mary the Virgin - St. Matthew's ACC,  Cos
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Amusing Cartoon for you all!
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Pipe "planting" problems
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: good and bad from ALL builders
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Gravissiama From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 07:18:05 -0500   Jeff White wrote:   > My question is why does a resultant work with flue pipes and not reeds? = I > saw a picture once of the Town Hall organ, (wasn't that in Melbourne??), = and > the 64' CC is HUGE!   When a 16' fundamental and a 10.2/3' are sounded together your ear appears = to hear also the difference in frequency between the two, which is at 32' = pitch. This is how a resultant comes about, and they are particularly effective = in small buildings where the standing waves from a real 32' are not set up = very well because the building isn't large enough. A resultant, however, = depends on a trick of the ear, and is therefore independent of there being real 32' standing waves in the building. Similarly, a 32' and a 21.1/3' sounding together will produce 64' resultant.   Any two pipes of the appropriate pitches will produce a resultant -- even = reed pipes. However, some types of stop work better than others. Most people = find what works best is to pull the 16' from a fairly loud flue, such as a 16' Principal or Open Wood, and the 10.2/3' from a slightly softer rank, such = as a Bourdon. That way the 32' resultant comes through, but the whole thing = doesn't sound too quinty. On small organs, however, where there is only one 16' = stop, it still works reasonably well to take both the 16' and the 10.2/3' from = the Bourdon.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Resultants: both flues and reeds considered From: "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 08:03:53 -0500   Jeff White wrote: > My question is why does a resultant work with flue pipes and not reeds? =     Then John L. Speller responded: > When a 16' fundamental and a 10.2/3' are sounded together your ear = appears to > hear also the difference in frequency between the two, which is at 32' = pitch.   <snip>   > A resultant, however, depends on a trick of the ear,   <snip>   > Any two pipes of the appropriate pitches will produce a resultant -- = even reed > pipes. However, some types of stop work better than others. Most = people find > what works best is to pull the 16' from a fairly loud flue, such as a = 16' > Principal or Open Wood, and the 10.2/3' from a slightly softer rank, = such as a > Bourdon. That way the 32' resultant comes through, but the whole thing = doesn't > sound too quinty.   <rest snipped>   John Speller "hinted" at the reason for reeds not being as successful for resultant pitches as low-toned flues, which is what Jeff White's original question was. To be more specific, reeds don't tend to work well, at least in most situations, because the intense harmonic structure of reed sound adds so much "grit" or "clang" to the tonal spectrum of a pipe organ that to then further compound that sound by applying quinte pitches produced by reed stops only serves to confuse and "clutter" the sound; thereby producing some very disagreeable inharmonicity, rather than adding anything of appreciable musical interest. (The sound of fingernails on chalkboards comes to mind!)   In the same way, flue Resultants aren't very successful once the pitches of them come up into the range where the quinte pitch can be audibly heard. (Usually around 8' C for the "parent" pitch) The accompanying quinte pitch can be easily "picked-out" of the ensemble and the resultant is no longer perceived. This is especially true when the quinte pitch is borrowed, rather than from its own rank, which can be tuned pure.   Most builders who add an "Acoustic Bass" or similar 32' synthetic stops will apply a resultant for the first 12 notes, and then "break back" so that the 16' stop alone is used starting at the 13th note through the remainder of the compass of the Pedal; which would result in true 32' pitch.   This seems to be the most workable compromise for small organs; particularly, as John suggested, where the Quinte pitch can be drawn from a softer stop than the "parent" unison pitch.   Faithfully, Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: Inharmonicity of some builders' 32' reeds From: "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 08:13:13 -0500   Dear List:   My posting of a few minutes ago reminded me of a nagging question which I've been pondering over for years:   I don't know if anyone else other than me has noticed, but it seems that for some reason (and this is NOT to disparage the quality of workmanship!) that Casavant 32' Reeds seem to have the most disagreeable inharmonic "growl" to them.   In listening to recordings and in person, 32' reeds by various folks which are both half and full-length have run the gamut to a car muffler at idle (very innocuous, obviously!) to French Bombardes.   But I've noticed that Casavant reeds seem to have a "9th" readily apparent in the speech of their reeds.   I've often wondered if it's a case that maybe they make the resonators of their reeds a tad too short or just what the reason might be?   I don't know if Denis Blain is on this list or not, and if so, if he'd like to perhaps comment.   I'm wondering if "experiments" with other resonator "length correction" scales might lead to different results.   Anyone else have any input or comments on this?   At least: a (hopefully) useful musical topic!   Blessed Sunday morning to everyone!   Faithfully, Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: RE: Allegro - part 8 From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 09:19:17 -0700   >My older daughter is a film maker in Hollywood. I'll see what she thinks >can be done. Right now, she's working on "Felicity." > >-----Original Message----- >From: John Vanderlee [mailto:jovanderlee@vassar.edu] >Sent: Friday, August 17, 2001 6:20 PM >To: PipeChat >Subject: RE: Allegro - part 8 >   As any parent with college bound kids: All support - for real and in spirit - much appreciated! ;-)   John V --  
(back) Subject: Re: Allegro From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 09:39:37 EDT   In a message dated 8/19/01 12:34:04 AM Eastern Daylight Time, david_n_carter@hotmail.com writes:   << As for author Jan Karon, mentioned by a list member responding to "Allegro," she wrote (and is still writing more) a series of books about the = adventures of a parish priest, loosely called the "Mitford Series." When I have = time, I'll check our voluminous library for the specific titles. >>   OK, I'll do it since I recently relistened to them on a long trip:   At Home in Mitford A Light in the Window These High Green Hills Out to Canaan A New Song A Common Life   The 5th one has, as one of its sub-plots, a somewhat hermit-ic organist = who lives next door to the house where the priest is staying temporarily.  
(back) Subject: Re: Inharmonicity of some builders' 32' reeds From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 10:09:46 EDT   Could be due to fractional length resonators. I believe, for a while, Aeolian-Skinner had experimented with 21-1/3' resonators on their 32s, as Aeolian had sometimes had contraquint = (10-2/3') resonators on their "Deep Bassoons."  
(back) Subject: 64 footers etc. From: <Doppelflote8@aol.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 11:42:41 EDT     --part1_114.36dd171.28b13871_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   The other real 64' is the "Contra-Trombone" in the William Hill and Son's organ in the SYDNEY Town Hall - not Melbourne. And that is actually a reed not a Diaphone.   Imagine recurving that tongue!   Chuckling! Alan in Methuen   --part1_114.36dd171.28b13871_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = COLOR=3D"#400040" SIZE=3D2><B>The other real 64' is the "Contra-Trombone" = in the William Hill and <BR>Son's organ in the SYDNEY Town Hall - not Melbourne. &nbsp;And that is =   <BR>actually a reed not a Diaphone. <BR> <BR>Imagine recurving that tongue! <BR> <BR>Chuckling! <BR>Alan in Methuen</B></FONT></HTML>   --part1_114.36dd171.28b13871_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: 64 footers etc. From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 12:28:09 -0400     --------------5B45CC0C5770714BEFC79622 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I can handle that I think Alan. I re-arch truck leaf springs for a living. Is it anything like that? :-) Cheers Mike   Doppelflote8@aol.com wrote:   > The other real 64' is the "Contra-Trombone" in the William Hill and > Son's organ in the SYDNEY Town Hall - not Melbourne. And that is > actually a reed not a Diaphone. > > Imagine recurving that tongue! > > Chuckling! > Alan in Methuen   --------------5B45CC0C5770714BEFC79622 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> <body bgcolor=3D"#FFFFFF"> I can handle that I think Alan. I re-arch truck leaf springs for a living. Is it anything like that?&nbsp; :-) <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Cheers <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Mike <p>Doppelflote8@aol.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><b><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font = color=3D"#400040"><font size=3D-1>The other real 64' is the "Contra-Trombone" in the William Hill = and</font></font></font></b> <br><b><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font color=3D"#400040"><font = size=3D-1>Son's organ in the SYDNEY Town Hall - not Melbourne.&nbsp; And that = is</font></font></font></b> <br><b><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font color=3D"#400040"><font = size=3D-1>actually a reed not a Diaphone.</font></font></font></b> <p><b><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font color=3D"#400040"><font = size=3D-1>Imagine recurving that tongue!</font></font></font></b> <p><b><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font color=3D"#400040"><font = size=3D-1>Chuckling!</font></font></font></b> <br><b><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font color=3D"#400040"><font = size=3D-1>Alan in Methuen</font></font></font></b></blockquote>   </body> </html>   --------------5B45CC0C5770714BEFC79622--    
(back) Subject: Pipe "planting" problems From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 15:45:26 EDT   Dear List members:   There has recently been a thread regarding the planting, or placement of pipes, upon the organ's soundboards, especially with regard to tuning accessibility as well as the stability of the final result.   Be reminded that a good curator DOES know how to tune, but if he or she is =   expected to temper and through-tune a 28 rank organ with three mixtures = and four reeds on a budget of 200 or 300 dollars per visit, do not expect = stellar results.   Also remember that your tuner did not design and lay out the organ; many organs, especially older factory organs, were laid out by ENGINEERS, not organbuilders. So yes, EVERYTHING fit in the chamber, but you can't releather the 8' bass of the Great Diapason without removing the entire division and its reservoirs; you have to reach through four ranks of = reeds to reach the V rank Plein Jeu; the organ is on chromatic chests, so that = the entire bass of the chest is unreachable, and everything draws out of tune because of the half-step layout (some builders STILL build on chromatic chests, beware). Hotspots in a chamber, or a church not getting their act =   together with temperature control, can all wreak havoc on the best = efforts, or thwart them entirely.   Fortunately, today, most organs built by smaller firms are designed and = layed out by organbuilders who intend to care for their own instruments, or have = so much experience in the caregiving end of the organ life that they respect = the access needed by the curator. For the most part, the era of the "layout engineer," or hiring a schoolkid for the draughting room (who has never = had to care for an organ), are over.   If you are planning a new pipe organ, you might say to your builder, "I'd give up one luxury stop or one extravagance just to make sure the organ = was completely serviceable and accessible." A tough bullet to bite, but in = the long run, it helps.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Allegro From: "Mandy Glass" <amadpoet@lycos.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 14:50:35 -0500   I'm about to reread these books myself. Jan Karon writes with particular = sensitivity and compassion, something I look for in fiction. Her treatment = of the organist in "A New Song" is wonderful.   Speaking of authors- my fellow bookworms should try out Mark Salzman. He = is a cellist, he studied Chinese literature at Harvard, and studied = various Chinese arts in China in his early twenties. A very talented = writer of fiction and nonfiction. His latest release "Lying Awake" is = about a Carmelite nun, and is one of the most moving books I've read in a = long time.   Mandy -- On Sun, 19 Aug 2001 09:39:37 ContraReed wrote:   >OK, I'll do it since I recently relistened to them on a long trip: > >At Home in Mitford >A Light in the Window >These High Green Hills >Out to Canaan >A New Song >A Common Life > >The 5th one has, as one of its sub-plots, a somewhat hermit-ic organist = who >lives next door to the house where the priest is staying temporarily.       Get 250 color business cards for FREE! http://businesscards.lycos.com/vp/fastpath/  
(back) Subject: Re: good and bad from ALL builders From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 15:54:38 EDT   The best thing for ANY builder to do is to build their OWN instrument, and = do it well. I think Chris Holtkamp will end up building Chris Holtkamps, if = his heart and soul tell him to devote his life to the art. He does not strike = me as the type of man who will "build what the client demands." How many distinguished builders have bounced back and forth from style to style and =   action to action, based upon the demands of a client? I think those = builders with varied output, when viewed through a broader lens, show an = evolutionary and intellectual journey that matures through discovery and insight, = rather than jarring jumps.   When off-the-cuff remarks are made about organbuilders who build in = historic styles, and they are referred to as "copyists," they contradict themselves =   when they single out particular artisans whose work they admire or like, = even if they are, in their estimation, "boutique builders." These organs are actually based upon styles and practices and philosophies which appeal to = and make sense to these builders, but they are very clear that they are not = out to copy.   It is very rare in the USA that an organbuilder has really gone out of his =   way to aver that he was building in the exact style and manner of a particular builder, or copying an entire instrument. When that happens, = the instrument is rarely a success beyond the academic exercise. They are acutely aware of their inspiration, and build modern organs within the context of the idiom.   SMG  
(back) Subject: Sunday Within the Octave of St. Mary the Virgin - St. Matthew's ACC, Costa Mesa CA (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 13:08:19 -0700   Opening Voluntary - I Am Black But Comely, O Ye Daughters of Jerusalem - Dupre Processional Hymn - Sing of Mary - Pleading Saviour Setting - Willan/Scottish Chant Sequence Hymn - Take My Life, And Let It Be - Hollingside Offertory Voluntary - How Fair and Pleasant Art Thou - Dupre Communion Voluntaries - too many to list (see below) Communion Hymn - Jerusalem, My Happy Home - Land of Rest Recessional Hymn - Ye Watchers and Ye Holy Ones - Vigiles et sancti Closing Voluntary - Improvisation upon "Vigiles et sancti" - I was too TIRED by that point to play anything ELSE   The late Mass congregation overflowed into the (empty) choir stalls ... communion took a good half-hour ... I played everything suitable that was lying around the console; then I started over again (grin). Thank GOODNESS I leave music lying around (chuckle).   I think we'll be building the main church sooner, rather than later ... we're only gaining about 50 seats in the interim church.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Amusing Cartoon for you all! From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 21:07:49 +0100   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0013_01C128F3.00DF9060 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Dear all,   The attached link takes you to a page of the Church Times, the newspaper = =3D of the Church of England.   http://www.churchtimes.co.uk/templates/extrasTemplate1List.asp?bimage=3D3De= =3D xtras   Hope you laugh as much as I did!   Steve, Canterbury, UK     ------=3D_NextPart_000_0013_01C128F3.00DF9060 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4134.600" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Dear all,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>The attached link takes you to a page = =3D of the Church=3D20 Times, the newspaper of the Church of England.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><A=3D20 href=3D3D"http://www.churchtimes.co.uk/templates/extrasTemplate1List.asp?bi= =3D mage=3D3Dextras">http://www.churchtimes.co.uk/templates/extrasTemplate1List= =3D ..asp?bimage=3D3Dextras</A></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Hope you laugh as much as I =3D did!</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Steve,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Canterbury, UK</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0013_01C128F3.00DF9060--    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe "planting" problems From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 16:12:59 EDT     --part1_d4.af5f8e1.28b177cb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Today I played at First Baptist - Gainesville FL, on very nice Casavant 3m =   from the 70s. I looked very carefully at the chest layout in the "window =   box" chests of the Great and Positiv. Window boxes were necessary in = this case because of small chambers which originally housed the 2/11 WurliTzer (now living in the Sarasota area)!! There are several photographs and complete stoplist on my webpage   http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ (got to Pet Hoomin -> Pipeorgans = -> Pipeorgans of Gainesville FL)   The layout on the chest placed the mixtures on the back.   On the Great the Principal 8 was in the middle, Octave 4 in front of it, = and the Flachflote 2 in front. Behind the Principal 8 ware the 8 and 4 = flutes, Sesquialtera II and the Mixture IV. The Quintaton 16 and Trompet 8 are toward the back of the chamber. The Principal 8 is just in front of the chamber wall opening.   On the Positiv (opposite side) the Fernflote 8 is just in front of the chamber opening with the Princial 4, Koppelflote 4 and Octave 2 in front. = The Gedekt 8, Larigot 1-1/3 and Cymbale III and Krummhorn are in back. Even though it isn't in "stock Babdis" design, it plays a beautiful = service, and, I think, would do so anywhere.   The flutes are very colorful and distinctive (the Fernflote is a = treasure), and the principals are very warm and rich sounding. The mixtures work = very well, even though the room is typically dead.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_d4.af5f8e1.28b177cb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Today I played at First = Baptist - Gainesville FL, on very nice Casavant 3m <BR>from the 70s. &nbsp;&nbsp;I looked very carefully at the chest layout = in the "window <BR>box" chests of the Great and Positiv. &nbsp;&nbsp;Window boxes were = necessary in this <BR>case because of small chambers which originally housed the 2/11 = WurliTzer <BR>(now living in the Sarasota area)!! &nbsp;&nbsp;There are several = photographs and <BR>complete stoplist on my webpage <BR> <BR>http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;(got to Pet = Hoomin -&gt; Pipeorgans -&gt; <BR>Pipeorgans of Gainesville FL) <BR> <BR>The layout on the chest placed the mixtures on the back. <BR> <BR>On the Great the Principal 8 was in the middle, Octave 4 in front of = it, and <BR>the Flachflote 2 in front. &nbsp;Behind the Principal 8 ware the 8 and = 4 flutes, <BR>Sesquialtera II and the Mixture IV. &nbsp;&nbsp;The Quintaton 16 and = Trompet 8 are <BR>toward the back of the chamber. &nbsp;The Principal 8 is just in front = of the <BR>chamber wall opening. <BR> <BR>On the Positiv (opposite side) the Fernflote 8 is just in front of the =   <BR>chamber opening with the Princial 4, Koppelflote 4 and Octave 2 in = front. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>The Gedekt 8, Larigot 1-1/3 and Cymbale III and Krummhorn are in back. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>Even though it isn't in "stock Babdis" design, it plays a beautiful = service, <BR>and, I think, would do so anywhere. <BR> <BR>The flutes are very colorful and distinctive (the Fernflote is a = treasure), <BR>and the principals are very warm and rich sounding. &nbsp;&nbsp;The = mixtures work very <BR>well, even though the room is typically dead. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_d4.af5f8e1.28b177cb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: good and bad from ALL builders From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 13:21:52 -0700 (PDT)   Dear TubaMagna:   You said it! Any worthwhile builder would be out of his mind to build an organ to the tastes of an "expert". A really good builder would never slip out of his groove and build something different to try to please some "expert" who usually doesn't know his head from a hole in the ground. Why should he? You went to him in the first place because you wanted his organ. Why ask or expect him to do something completely different? You don't go to Holtkamp for a Fisk.   In building in historic styles, I have always found it funny that someone will be carried away with a particular organ in Europe in a resonant stone building with glorious acoustics and try to copy that sound in a padded cell. I would like to get one of those old organs, have it shipped - dirt and all - and install it in one of our typical American carpeted padded cells, and take one of our fine American organs out of a padded cell and install it somewhere like Notre Dame in Paris and let them see who REALLY builds fine organs.   D. Keith Morgan --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > The best thing for ANY builder to do is to build > their OWN instrument, and do > it well. I think Chris Holtkamp will end up > building Chris Holtkamps, if his > heart and soul tell him to devote his life to the > art. He does not strike me > as the type of man who will "build what the client > demands." How many > distinguished builders have bounced back and forth > from style to style and > action to action, based upon the demands of a > client? I think those builders > with varied output, when viewed through a broader > lens, show an evolutionary > and intellectual journey that matures through > discovery and insight, rather > than jarring jumps. > > When off-the-cuff remarks are made about > organbuilders who build in historic > styles, and they are referred to as "copyists," they > contradict themselves > when they single out particular artisans whose work > they admire or like, even > if they are, in their estimation, "boutique > builders." These organs are > actually based upon styles and practices and > philosophies which appeal to and > make sense to these builders, but they are very > clear that they are not out > to copy. > > It is very rare in the USA that an organbuilder has > really gone out of his > way to aver that he was building in the exact style > and manner of a > particular builder, or copying an entire instrument. > When that happens, the > instrument is rarely a success beyond the academic > exercise. They are > acutely aware of their inspiration, and build modern > organs within the > context of the idiom. > > SMG > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger http://phonecard.yahoo.com/