PipeChat Digest #2329 - Monday, August 20, 2001
 
Re: Resultants: both flues and reeds considered
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
Re: 64 footers etc.
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Resultants: both flues and reeds considered
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Pipe "planting" problems
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Pipe "planting" problems
  by <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Amusing Cartoon for you all!
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Chromatic, Diatonic, and Maj3rd Planting
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Chromatic, Diatonic, and Maj3rd Planting
  by <TEvans1032@aol.com>
Re: Pipe "planting" problems
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Chromatic, Diatonic, and Maj3rd Planting
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Pipe "planting" problems
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Immanuel Luthern/Martin Ott Opus 29
  by <TEvans1032@aol.com>
Re: Immanuel Luthern/Martin Ott Opus 29
  by <TEvans1032@aol.com>
Re: 32' Reeds & Flues
  by <RJAYWILL@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Resultants: both flues and reeds considered From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 13:46:39 -0700 (PDT)   The reason 32' Resultants are made from flue pipes (almost always from Bourdons), is because these pipes have relatively little harmonic development above the fundamental, and they occasionally will not make the quint (10 2/3') quite so obvious. However, I've never heard one that I liked.   A reed on the other hand has a large blaze of upper harmonics, some of which would clash, were two notes played together. People would think that the organist had landed on the wrong note.   One organ that I tune in Longview, Texas at the First Baptist Church (Aeolian-Skinner, Op. 1174, 1951) has a 32' Bourdon in which CCCC to FFFF# are resultant; GGGG to BBBB are real 32' Bourdons. Low CCCC plays three pipes: 32' GGGG, 16' CCC, and 16' GGG. I cut off the 32' pitch from those notes because it was too lond. When I play the organ, I play an octave higher when I go below f#, because I dislike the quint sound.   D. Keith Morgan         > Jeff White wrote: > > > My question is why does a resultant work with flue > pipes and not reeds? > > Then John L. Speller responded: > > > When a 16' fundamental and a 10.2/3' are sounded > together your ear appears to > > hear also the difference in frequency between the > two, which is at 32' pitch. > > <snip> > > > A resultant, however, depends on a trick of the > ear, > > <snip> > > > Any two pipes of the appropriate pitches will > produce a resultant -- even reed > > pipes. However, some types of stop work better > than others. Most people find > > what works best is to pull the 16' from a fairly > loud flue, such as a 16' > > Principal or Open Wood, and the 10.2/3' from a > slightly softer rank, such as a > > Bourdon. That way the 32' resultant comes > through, but the whole thing doesn't > > sound too quinty. > > <rest snipped> > > John Speller "hinted" at the reason for reeds not > being as successful > for resultant pitches as low-toned flues, which is > what Jeff White's > original question was. To be more specific, reeds > don't tend to work > well, at least in most situations, because the > intense harmonic > structure of reed sound adds so much "grit" or > "clang" to the tonal > spectrum of a pipe organ that to then further > compound that sound by > applying quinte pitches produced by reed stops only > serves to confuse > and "clutter" the sound; thereby producing some very > disagreeable > inharmonicity, rather than adding anything of > appreciable musical > interest. (The sound of fingernails on chalkboards > comes to mind!) > > In the same way, flue Resultants aren't very > successful once the pitches > of them come up into the range where the quinte > pitch can be audibly > heard. (Usually around 8' C for the "parent" pitch) > The accompanying > quinte pitch can be easily "picked-out" of the > ensemble and the > resultant is no longer perceived. This is > especially true when the > quinte pitch is borrowed, rather than from its own > rank, which can be > tuned pure. > > Most builders who add an "Acoustic Bass" or similar > 32' synthetic stops > will apply a resultant for the first 12 notes, and > then "break back" so > that the 16' stop alone is used starting at the 13th > note through the > remainder of the compass of the Pedal; which would > result in true 32' > pitch. > > This seems to be the most workable compromise for > small organs; > particularly, as John suggested, where the Quinte > pitch can be drawn > from a softer stop than the "parent" unison pitch. > > Faithfully, > > Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO > SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. > Pipe Organ Builders > 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 > Kenney, IL 61749-0137 > (217) 944-2454 VOX > (217) 944-2527 FAX > mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL > mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL > http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger http://phonecard.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: 64 footers etc. From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 18:38:50 -0400   For more information, you can go to this URL:   http://users.interact.net.au/~pwaa/sydneyt.html   There are some good pictures of the organ and some interesting information =   about it. Cheers, TommyLee in Virginia   > The other real 64' is the "Contra-Trombone" in the William Hill and > Son's organ in the SYDNEY Town Hall - not Melbourne. And that is > actually a reed not a Diaphone.    
(back) Subject: Re: Resultants: both flues and reeds considered From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 08:14:15 +0800   A soft 16' reed (Fagotto) gives a good resultant 32' if quinted with a bourdon. Bob E.   douglas morgan wrote: > > The reason 32' Resultants are made from flue pipes > (almost always from Bourdons), is because these pipes > have relatively little harmonic development above the > fundamental, and they occasionally will not make the > quint (10 2/3') quite so obvious. However, I've never > heard one that I liked. > > A reed on the other hand has a large blaze of upper > harmonics, some of which would clash, were two notes > played together. People would think that the organist > had landed on the wrong note. > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe "planting" problems From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 19:27:25 -0500   Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > Window boxes were necessary in this > case because of small chambers which originally > housed the 2/11 WurliTzer > (now living in the Sarasota area)!!   So why not build a nice case, projecting three or four feet in front of the chamber opening?   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe "planting" problems From: <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 21:23:15 -0400   On Sun, Aug 19, 2001 at 03:45:26PM -0400, TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > Dear List members: > > There has recently been a thread regarding the planting, or placement of =   > pipes, upon the organ's soundboards, especially with regard to tuning > accessibility as well as the stability of the final result. > > Be reminded that a good curator DOES know how to tune, but if he or she = is > expected to temper and through-tune a 28 rank organ with three mixtures = and > four reeds on a budget of 200 or 300 dollars per visit, do not expect = stellar > results. > > Also remember that your tuner did not design and lay out the organ; = many > organs, especially older factory organs, were laid out by ENGINEERS, not =   > organbuilders. So yes, EVERYTHING fit in the chamber, but you can't > releather the 8' bass of the Great Diapason without removing the entire > division and its reservoirs; you have to reach through four ranks of = reeds > to reach the V rank Plein Jeu; the organ is on chromatic chests, so = that the > entire bass of the chest is unreachable, and everything draws out of = tune > because of the half-step layout (some builders STILL build on chromatic > chests, beware). Hotspots in a chamber, or a church not getting their = act > together with temperature control, can all wreak havoc on the best = efforts, > or thwart them entirely. > > Fortunately, today, most organs built by smaller firms are designed and = layed > out by organbuilders who intend to care for their own instruments, or = have so > much experience in the caregiving end of the organ life that they = respect the > access needed by the curator. For the most part, the era of the "layout =   > engineer," or hiring a schoolkid for the draughting room (who has never = had > to care for an organ), are over. > > If you are planning a new pipe organ, you might say to your builder, = "I'd > give up one luxury stop or one extravagance just to make sure the organ = was > completely serviceable and accessible." A tough bullet to bite, but in = the > long run, it helps. > > Sebastian Matthaus Gluck > New York City > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > Question: What're chromatic chests as opposed to (whatever else)?   Thanx     Charles  
(back) Subject: Re: Amusing Cartoon for you all! From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 21:49:44 EDT     --part1_cb.154b0132.28b1c6b8_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   That is really cute. I remember years ago when I played some kind of an electronic with a tape recorder attachment. One Sunday the acolyte = didn't show up, so at the conclusion of the benediction, i pushed the button and started a big French toccata that I listened to while doing "chores." = Then I grabbed the snuffer and went to work. The expressions on some of the faces in the congregation were priceless.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_cb.154b0132.28b1c6b8_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>That is really cute. = &nbsp;&nbsp;I remember years ago when I played some kind of an <BR>electronic with a tape recorder attachment. &nbsp;&nbsp;One Sunday the = acolyte didn't <BR>show up, so at the conclusion of the benediction, i pushed the button = and <BR>started a big French toccata that I listened to while doing "chores." = &nbsp;&nbsp;Then <BR>I grabbed the snuffer and went to work. &nbsp;&nbsp;The expressions on = some of the <BR>faces in the congregation were priceless. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_cb.154b0132.28b1c6b8_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Chromatic, Diatonic, and Maj3rd Planting From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 22:01:54 EDT   Charles Krug asked: "What're chromatic chests as opposed to (whatever = else)?"   If you look at a pipe organ, you will notice a variety of layouts for the pipes -- the way they are staggered, the way their lengths run, etc.   Chromatic arrangements are those in which the organ pipes are literally = laid out in the Chromatic Scale: C, C-sharp, D, D-sharp, E, F, F-sharp, etc. They are all in a row, the largest at the bottom (usually the left when facing an instrument, as this makes for better visual correlation between = the keyboard and the pipework), progressing to the smallest, higher pitched = pipes at the opposite end.   The biggest problem with Chromatic layout is that pipes tend to "draw" = toward each other; the resonant bodies of air within each pipe are so close to = each other that a pipe can actually pull out of tune TOWARD another pipe, as if =   they are trying to agree. The effect is worse on larger-scaled (wider diameter) ranks. The problem is compounded with mixtures, since they frequently "think they're the pipe next door." Cottoning off the adjacent =   pipes during tuning makes things even worse. Experienced organ tuners = have developed methods of cleanly tuning mixtures on Chromatic chests, but it = is still a pain.   The other difficulty with Chromatic windchest arrangement is that the = basses are nearly impossible to reach, usually stacked up in the corner of a chamber. Whereas at the treble end of the soundboard, one might be able = to reach all the way over and back on a perchboard, basses become buried and usually neglected, eventually becoming significantly out of tune, and out = of regulation.   DIATONIC windchest arrangements are a step in the right direction: They = are planted in C and C-sharp "sides," in whole steps. While there is still = some drawing, it is much less severe, and the pipes are twice as accessible. Diatonic chests can be planted as "A" chests, with the longest pipe in the =   middle, and the smaller ones falling away in order alternately on either side, or what we call an "M" chest, with the lowest two pipes at the outer =   ends, the smallest in the center.   "N" chests are a bit of a hybrid, and were common in late 19th century American mechanical action organs; the bottom octave or two was split diatonically, and the remainder of the treble was chromatic, giving the entire pipe display the appearance of an "N".   Major Third Formation is a time-honored and very sensible way to plant = organ pipes, providing much more stable tuning, more even live load on the soundboard and structure, and more even wind consumption, with fewer = treble "gulps" when large bass chords are struck. Some even feel that held = chords on Major Third (or "Major Tierce Formation") soundboards actually DRAW = into better tune with each other, locking in sympathetic harmonics which might otherwise drift in certain temperaments. Thirds and fifths tend to "find each other," for some reason. This centuries-old arrangement, abandoned = for a few decades, is gaining greater appreciation with each passing year.   Major Tierce/Major Third chests are planted in four repeated groupings, = and can have a variety of different configurations of these groupings:   C - E - Gsharp Csharp - F - A D - Fsharp - Asharp Dsharp - G - B   Note that organbuilders do not use "flats" in their terminology, so when writing notes to your organ curator, use sharps instead of flats. It's a longstanding convention, although I do not know its particular history.   I hope this explains a bit of what we're talking about.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck Tonal Director GLUCK NEW YORK Pipe Organ Conservators, Architects, and Builders New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Chromatic, Diatonic, and Maj3rd Planting From: <TEvans1032@aol.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 22:15:50 EDT     --part1_f8.e6b038b.28b1ccd6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/19/01 9:03:09 PM Central Daylight Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:   Our Martin Ott has the lowest 12 in the center then the next lowest are = the outside of the chest and this is a diatonic chest.       > DIATONIC windchest arrangements are a step in the right direction: They = are > planted in C and C-sharp "sides," in whole steps. While there is still > some > drawing, it is much less severe, and the pipes are twice as accessible. =   > Diatonic chests can be planted as "A" chests, with the longest pipe in = the > middle, and the smaller ones falling away in order alternately on either =   > side, or what we call an "M" chest, with the lowest two pipes at the = outer >       --part1_f8.e6b038b.28b1ccd6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/19/01 9:03:09 PM Central Daylight Time, <BR>TubaMagna@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR>Our Martin Ott has the lowest 12 in the center then the next lowest = are the <BR>outside of the chest and this is a diatonic chest. &nbsp; <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">DIATONIC windchest = arrangements are a step in the right direction: &nbsp;They are <BR>planted in C and C-sharp "sides," in whole steps. &nbsp;While there is = still <BR>some <BR>drawing, it is much less severe, and the pipes are twice as = accessible. &nbsp; <BR>Diatonic chests can be planted as "A" chests, with the longest pipe in = the <BR>middle, and the smaller ones falling away in order alternately on = either <BR>side, or what we call an "M" chest, with the lowest two pipes at the = outer <BR>ends, the smallest in the center.</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_f8.e6b038b.28b1ccd6_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe "planting" problems From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 22:24:39 EDT     --part1_133.47e0be.28b1cee7_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/19/01 8:28:04 PM Eastern Daylight Time, jlspeller@mindspring.com writes:     > So why not build a nice case, projecting three or > four feet in front of the chamber opening? > >   It was the 70's!!! Window boxes were the rage. I think they did the = best they could under the circumstances. Had they done cases they probably = could have gotten more organ in there and not had to use (ugh) chromatic chests.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_133.47e0be.28b1cee7_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/19/01 8:28:04 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>jlspeller@mindspring.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">So why not build a = nice case, projecting three or <BR>four feet in front of the chamber opening? <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>It was the 70's!!! &nbsp;&nbsp;Window boxes were the rage. = &nbsp;&nbsp;I think they did the best <BR>they could under the circumstances. &nbsp;&nbsp;Had they done cases = they probably could <BR>have gotten more organ in there and not had to use (ugh) chromatic = chests. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_133.47e0be.28b1cee7_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Chromatic, Diatonic, and Maj3rd Planting From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 22:42:20 -0400     --------------CDD4CDFBB28DF2FA1C80029E Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Would this be a "W" chest?   TEvans1032@aol.com wrote:   > > > Our Martin Ott has the lowest 12 in the center then the next lowest > are the > outside of the chest and this is a diatonic chest. > >   --------------CDD4CDFBB28DF2FA1C80029E Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> Would this be a "W" chest? <p>TEvans1032@aol.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font = size=3D-1></font></font>&nbsp; <p><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>Our Martin Ott has the = lowest 12 in the center then the next lowest are the</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>outside of the chest = and this is a diatonic chest.</font></font> <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp;</blockquote> </html>   --------------CDD4CDFBB28DF2FA1C80029E--    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe "planting" problems From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 22:55:27 EDT     --part1_6c.ecd7b45.28b1d61f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/19/01 9:22:03 PM Eastern Daylight Time, cdkrug@worldnet.att.net writes:     > What're chromatic chests as opposed to (whatever else)? > If anyone would like a copy of a simple drawing I made to illustrate chest =   layouts, please let me know.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_6c.ecd7b45.28b1d61f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/19/01 9:22:03 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>cdkrug@worldnet.att.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">What're chromatic = chests as opposed to (whatever else)? <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">If anyone would like a copy of a simple drawing = I made to illustrate chest <BR>layouts, please let me know. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_6c.ecd7b45.28b1d61f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Immanuel Luthern/Martin Ott Opus 29 From: <TEvans1032@aol.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 23:06:12 EDT     --part1_62.12c8d4cb.28b1d8a4_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I have a small webpage of Immanuel Lutheran in Waterloo, IL just outside = of St. Louis and a couple pictures of the sanctuary and instrument. I can't find the official stop list to put on there, and I'm awfull at remembering =   the stop names. Will keep adding pictures as I get them scanned.   Travis   --part1_62.12c8d4cb.28b1d8a4_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I have a small webpage = of Immanuel Lutheran in Waterloo, IL just outside of <BR>St. Louis and a couple pictures of the sanctuary and instrument. = &nbsp;I can't <BR>find the official stop list to put on there, and I'm awfull at = remembering <BR>the stop names. &nbsp;Will keep adding pictures as I get them scanned. <BR> <BR>Travis </FONT></HTML>   --part1_62.12c8d4cb.28b1d8a4_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Immanuel Luthern/Martin Ott Opus 29 From: <TEvans1032@aol.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 23:18:09 EDT     --part1_62.12c8d4ce.28b1db71_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Whoops, might need this   members.aol.com/~tevans1032   --part1_62.12c8d4ce.28b1db71_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Whoops, might need this <BR> <BR>members.aol.com/~tevans1032</FONT></HTML>   --part1_62.12c8d4ce.28b1db71_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: 32' Reeds & Flues From: <RJAYWILL@aol.com> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 23:57:27 EDT   The entire subject is a problem, and currently, it is really only a = problem about money. Those churches and organ builders who have the money to do = it, build the real thing. Those who do not, use other methods, i.e. = electronics or harmonics. Wired harmonics are not really that much of a problem in = the lower range, although it bothers me, but when that technic is used in the upper ranges, it is a disaster. I really wish that organ companies would = be more honest about their stop lists.   R Jay Willliamson