PipeChat Digest #2330 - Monday, August 20, 2001
 
Pipe planting problems
  by <Doppelflote8@aol.com>
wanted: seeburg or wurlitzer xylophone vacuum action, pipe  pressure gaug
  by <homerat@mindspring.com>
Re: wanted: pressure guage..
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: wanted: pressure guage..
  by "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu>
Re: the cost of fine workmanship  - - salesTaxes? - nope
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: First Baptist Church in Dallas - other info about the Casavant
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: screaming mixtures
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Pipe planting problems
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Pipe planting problems
  by "Audrey Jacobsen" <AJ1995@home.com>
Re: Pipe "planting" problems
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Pipe "planting" problems
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Pipe "planting" problems
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: screaming mixtures
  by <TEvans1032@aol.com>
Re: the cost of fine workmanship  - - salesTaxes? - nope
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Pipe planting problems From: <Doppelflote8@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 08:43:25 EDT     --part1_dd.19418810.28b25fed_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear list   As one who has to frequently finish and tune one of our new instruments = or a rebuilt one, i am constantly mumbling:   "DESIGNERS....GO TUNE AN ORGAN!"   As far as planting mixtures in front of or behind the reeds, Id rather = detune one or two reeds ( assuming the walkboard is on the back of the chest) = than detune a 4 rank mixture trying to tune the reed. If the organ is well = built or rebuilt , the pipes are in good shape and well winded you should have = to do very little flue tuning. Therefore, putting the mixtures in front of = the reeds makes sense.   Food for Thought Alan in Methuen   --part1_dd.19418810.28b25fed_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = COLOR=3D"#400040" SIZE=3D2><B>Dear list <BR> <BR>As one who has to frequently finish and tune &nbsp;one of our new = instruments or a <BR>rebuilt one, i am constantly mumbling: <BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;"DESIGNERS....GO TUNE AN ORGAN!" <BR> <BR>As far as planting mixtures in front of or behind the reeds, Id rather = detune <BR>one or two reeds ( assuming the walkboard is on the back of the chest) = than <BR>detune a 4 rank mixture trying to tune the reed. &nbsp;If the organ is = well built <BR>or rebuilt , the pipes are in good shape and well winded you should = have to <BR>do very little flue tuning. &nbsp;Therefore, putting the mixtures in = front of the <BR>reeds makes sense. <BR> <BR>Food for Thought <BR>Alan in Methuen</B></FONT></HTML>   --part1_dd.19418810.28b25fed_boundary--  
(back) Subject: wanted: seeburg or wurlitzer xylophone vacuum action, pipe pressure gauge 0-16 From: <homerat@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 09:25:27 -0700   Does anyone have a seeburg or wurlitzer xylophone vacuum action for sale? We also need a pipe pressure gauge 0-16" wp? Limited budget.     Thanks, Kelly and Stephen Goodman  
(back) Subject: Re: wanted: pressure guage.. From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 13:33:35 EDT   Hi Kelly and Stephen:   A wind pressure guage can be easily made at home. Clear flexable tubing about 6' of it, an old small wooden pipe foot, a scrap piece of pine 4"-6" wide and some sort of clamping method to hold the tubing in place. When finished the tubing(any size) will have a turn 180 degrees at the top and another turn of the tubing 180 degrees at the bottom turning upwards again. Determine a midline across the three folds of the tubing, put an amount of water in the free end of the tube to exactly fill half the free end as well as half the middle tube. Attach the pipe = foot to the lower opening of the tubing, remove middle A play the note and measure with a ruler the amount of water displaced from the mid line in both directions from the mid point. The wood piece needs to be at least 20" long. Organ builders have made these home made wind pressure guages for a long time. If the tubing is slightly opaque use food coloring in the water like red for a more accurate view. Glass tubing has been used in the past. Make sure your guage is upright during the WP test.   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: RE: wanted: pressure guage.. From: "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 12:45:56 -0500   I made one of these gauges when I first got my home pipe organ playing. However, I did not know that you measured the displaced water above *and* below the reference line. I was setting my big regulators to 3-1/2". So = I just measured and set my pressure with only measuring above the reference line. I was sure shocked with I played my first notes. I thought I had a real screamer coming to live in my house. My 3-1/2" pipework playing at = 7" was exciting!   Have a good week!   Craig Elders   -----Original Message----- From: RonSeverin@aol.com [mailto:RonSeverin@aol.com] Sent: Monday, August 20, 2001 12:34 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: wanted: pressure guage..     Hi Kelly and Stephen:   A wind pressure guage can be easily made at home. Clear flexable tubing about 6' of it, an old small wooden pipe foot, a scrap piece of pine 4"-6" wide and some sort of clamping method to hold the tubing in place. When finished the tubing(any size) will have a turn 180 degrees at the top and another turn of the tubing 180 degrees at the bottom turning upwards again. Determine a midline across the three folds of the tubing, put an amount of water in the free end of the tube to exactly fill half the free end as well as half the middle tube. Attach the pipe = foot to the lower opening of the tubing, remove middle A play the note and measure with a ruler the amount of water displaced from the mid line in both directions from the mid point. The wood piece needs to be at least 20" long. Organ builders have made these home made wind pressure guages for a long time. If the tubing is slightly opaque use food coloring in the water like red for a more accurate view. Glass tubing has been used in the past. Make sure your guage is upright during the WP test.   Regards,   Ron Severin   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: the cost of fine workmanship - - salesTaxes? - nope From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 16:30:31 EDT     --part1_7a.19945e89.28b2cd67_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/15/2001 7:35:40 PM Eastern Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:     > mostly to avoid paying additional taxes (grin) ... I think the sales >   BBBBUUUUZZZZZZ - wrong... It is highly unlikely that your church will pay any sales tax on ANY organ =   built, Especially if done out-of-state as most state governments EXEMPT churches from being liable for sales and use taxes.   Rick in VA   --part1_7a.19945e89.28b2cd67_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/15/2001 7:35:40 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">mostly to avoid = paying additional taxes (grin) ... I think the sales <BR>tax on our organ will be something like $17K (!)</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>BBBBUUUUZZZZZZ - wrong... <BR>It is highly unlikely that your church will pay any sales tax on ANY = organ <BR>built, Especially if done out-of-state as most state governments = EXEMPT <BR>churches from being liable for sales and use taxes. <BR> <BR>Rick &nbsp;in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_7a.19945e89.28b2cd67_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: First Baptist Church in Dallas - other info about the Casavant From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 16:30:35 EDT     --part1_44.12131427.28b2cd6b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/18/2001 1:28:35 PM Eastern Daylight Time, dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com writes:       > . The bulk of the > organ was an old 1920s Casavant from the Eaton > Auditorium in Toronto to which they added much > pipework and several divisions as well as the > five-manual console. > >       I spent some time in Toronto working on/playing the organ at the Organ Grinder Restaurant, which was nearby to the Eaton Auditorium (Which incidentally was an auditorium on the top floor of Eaton's department store). At that time, the console had been "Chopped" loose and was sitting = in a back hallway in the store. The organ was donated to a large Assemblies = of God Congregation there in Toronto, which congregation was planning to = build a new facility. I was asked to bid on the removal of this organ (which I declined to do due to the necessity of having much of the organ's largetr components lowerd by crane to street level). The organ was installed in chambers ABOVE the stage of the auditorium. I still have copies of the Casavant drawings somewhere in my files... Anyway, Keates-Geisler eventually latched onto this organ and the rest -as =   they say - is history. Which wsa a short-lived chapter. Keates-Geisler was =   not very thorough with their workmanship in this (and several other) = organs and resulted in them having a very short life-span. I seem to remember = that there was some legal wrangling connected to one of their installations but =   don't remember the details at this moment. Something to do with misrepresentation?   Rick M in VA   --part1_44.12131427.28b2cd6b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/18/2001 1:28:35 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">. &nbsp;The bulk = of the <BR>organ was an old 1920s Casavant from the Eaton <BR>Auditorium in Toronto to which they added much <BR>pipework and several divisions as well as the <BR>five-manual console. <BR> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR>I spent some time in Toronto working on/playing the organ at the Organ =   <BR>Grinder Restaurant, which was nearby to the Eaton Auditorium (Which <BR>incidentally was an auditorium on the top floor of &nbsp;Eaton's = department <BR>store). At that time, the console had been "Chopped" loose and was = sitting in <BR>a back hallway in the store. The organ was donated to a large = Assemblies of <BR>God Congregation there in Toronto, which congregation was planning to = build a <BR>new facility. I was asked to bid on the removal of this organ (which I =   <BR>declined to do due to the necessity of having much of the organ's = largetr <BR>components lowerd by crane to street level). The organ was installed = in <BR>chambers ABOVE the stage of the auditorium. I still have copies of the =   <BR>Casavant drawings somewhere in my files... <BR>Anyway, Keates-Geisler eventually latched onto this organ and the rest = -as <BR>they say - is history. Which wsa a short-lived chapter. Keates-Geisler = was <BR>not very thorough with their workmanship in this (and several other) = organs <BR>and resulted in them having a very short life-span. I seem to remember = that <BR>there was some legal wrangling connected to one of their installations = but <BR>don't remember the details at this moment. <BR>Something to do with misrepresentation? <BR> <BR>Rick M in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_44.12131427.28b2cd6b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: screaming mixtures From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 16:30:32 EDT     --part1_ae.19876567.28b2cd68_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/17/2001 9:56:26 AM Eastern Daylight Time, wgvideo@attglobal.net writes:     > Why do trackers have the mixtures buried back in the case behind the > principals. The mixtures get a chance to blend with the organ.   Actually, in MOST tracker organs, the mixtures are a the back so that the TUNER can have access to them, and so they are not buried behind taller = ranks that obstruct the tuner's access. (Unlike one organ where I have to tune a =   Scharff III thru the 8' Trompette inside the Swell)   Rick in VA   --part1_ae.19876567.28b2cd68_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/17/2001 9:56:26 AM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>wgvideo@attglobal.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Why do trackers = have the mixtures buried back in the case behind the <BR>principals. The mixtures get a chance to blend with the organ. = &nbsp;&nbsp;</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>Actually, in MOST tracker organs, the mixtures are a the back so that = the <BR>TUNER can have access to them, and so they are not buried behind = taller ranks <BR>that obstruct the tuner's access. (Unlike one organ where I have to = tune a <BR>Scharff III thru the 8' Trompette inside the Swell) <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_ae.19876567.28b2cd68_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe planting problems From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 16:47:26 EDT     --part1_be.19499db4.28b2d15e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   One of my favorite examples is in a 2/21 Moller at Holy Faith RC- Gainesville. The organ is double decked with the Great chest forming the =   top of the Swell box. The Swell is nice and roomy with a wide walkboard = at the back and another over the treble pipes of the "M" chest.   To get to the Great you go up one of those miniature ladders screwed to = the side of the Swell box Once you get to the top of the box you are greeted =   with an 8" walk board that passes between the Great and Pedal chests, the Great Bourdon on your left and the Pedal Choralbass 4 on your right. = The Great chest layout is "A" with the Bourdon 8 on the back, Principal 8 = next, then Octave 4, Flachflote 2 and (bless 'em) the Mixture IV on the FRONT. = To get to the front you have to do a balancing act on either of two 8" walk boards over the treble pipes on either end, however, the walk board is = about 20" above the top of the chest and requires some very strange achrobatics. = On the front of the Great chest is another 8" walkboard with the mixture = on one side and about a 20' drop on the other. About another 8" from the = walk board are the facade pipes of the Pedal Principal which has scrolls on the =   back for tuning, but they are out of arms reach (I think you're supposed = to use heave stones to move the scrolls!!!). There is not room to sit, bend, =   kneel, but you can stand up straight, but then you can't reach the = mixture!! It's a very handsome layout visually, and the organ is pretty = successful due to the nice acoustics. The principal 8 was replaced with a new = Italian one several years ago. It's beautiful.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_be.19499db4.28b2d15e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>One of my favorite = examples is in a 2/21 Moller at Holy Faith RC- <BR>Gainesville. &nbsp;&nbsp;The organ is double decked with the Great = chest forming the <BR>top of the Swell box. &nbsp;&nbsp;The Swell is nice and roomy with a = wide walkboard at <BR>the back and another over the treble pipes of the "M" chest. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>To get to the Great you go up one of those miniature ladders screwed = to the <BR>side of the Swell box &nbsp;&nbsp;Once you get to the top of the box = you are greeted <BR>with an 8" walk board that passes between the Great and Pedal chests, = the <BR>Great Bourdon on your left and the Pedal Choralbass 4 on your right. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The <BR>Great chest layout is "A" with the Bourdon 8 on the back, Principal 8 = next, <BR>then Octave 4, Flachflote 2 and (bless 'em) the Mixture IV on the = FRONT. &nbsp;&nbsp;To <BR>get to the front you have to do a balancing act on either of two 8" = walk <BR>boards over the treble pipes on either end, however, the walk board is = about <BR>20" above the top of the chest and requires some very strange = achrobatics. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>On the front of the Great chest is another 8" walkboard &nbsp;with the = mixture on <BR>one side and about a 20' drop on the other. &nbsp;&nbsp;About another = 8" from the walk <BR>board are the facade pipes of the Pedal Principal which has scrolls on = the <BR>back for tuning, but they are out of arms reach (I think you're = supposed to <BR>use heave stones to move the scrolls!!!). &nbsp;There is not room to = sit, bend, <BR>kneel, but you can stand up straight, but then you can't reach the = mixture!! &nbsp; <BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;It's a very handsome layout visually, and the organ = is pretty successful <BR>due to the nice acoustics. &nbsp;&nbsp;The principal 8 was replaced = with a new Italian <BR>one several years ago. &nbsp;It's beautiful. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_be.19499db4.28b2d15e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe planting problems From: "Audrey Jacobsen" <AJ1995@home.com> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 14:26:54 -0700   For those of use who will be involved in the planning and design of a new pipe organ, this has been invaluable information.   Thanks to Alan, Bruce, Charles, John and others who have contributed to this important and overlooked subject of organ maintenance.   Regards, Audrey Jacobsen  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe "planting" problems From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 16:54:40 -0500   Chromatic vs Diatonic chests:   Chromatic follows the pipes from left to right -low C on up to high C- in direct relation to the manual compass.   Diatonic has pipes alternating on either side -ie: C,D,E on one side and C#,D#,F on the other side.   Bartons were chromaticlly planted and tuned, while WurliTzer had diatonic planting and tuning. Diatonic makes for inconvenient tuning -swinging from side-to-side, while chromatic tuning can be easilly breezed right thru.   Rick    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe "planting" problems From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 17:31:27 -0500   At 4:54 PM -0500 8/20/01, VEAGUE wrote: >Bartons were chromaticlly planted and tuned, while WurliTzer had diatonic >planting and tuning. Diatonic makes for inconvenient tuning -swinging = from >side-to-side, while chromatic tuning can be easilly breezed right thru.   RE: Diatonic chests - Not if you have someone at the console that knows what they are doing! And you don't go from side to side but rather up one side and then the other.   Those of us that do lots of tuning work make it a point when we are holding keys to find out the layout of the chests to facilitate the person's time up in the chamber. That is the responsibility of the person at the console. When a church is being charged X number of dollars an hour you want to make your time there is spent profitably. Whenever I go to a church that i haven't been to previously my boss makes sure that I climb up into the organ to see the layout so I can see what he is facing while tuning. It makes things a lot simpler for both of us and avoids major problems and yelling!   In one of the organs we tune fairly regularly I know exactly what kinds of layouts each of the stops are on, whether they are on Tierce chests or on off-sets that are either chromatic or diatonic and I know exactly where the ranks change chests and adjust for it in holding notes. In the Positif Division I know that two of the reeds are on two different Tierce chests so I know to go up the first reed starting at the C side and then do the next reed starting with the C# side so all the tuner has to do is turn around and work his way across the other chest after doing the first of the reeds.   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe "planting" problems From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 17:39:47 -0500   At 04:54 PM 8/20/01 -0500, Rick wrote: <snip> > Diatonic makes for inconvenient tuning -swinging from >side-to-side, while chromatic tuning can be easilly breezed right thru. >   Uhhh, pardon if this is a silly question <g>, but why would you tune diatonic chests chromatically? With the possible exception of celeste ranks (in order to keep the beating pattern smooth up and down the rank), why would you not simply tune the "C" side, then the "C#"...?? Maybe I misunderstood your statement...? (even the most novice keyholder is usually capable of understanding "every OTHER key on the keyboard, regardless of what color or shape it is..."<g>)   Cheers,   Tim    
(back) Subject: Re: screaming mixtures From: <TEvans1032@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 18:40:11 EDT     --part1_24.18145c13.28b2ebcb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 8/20/01 3:35:57 PM Central Daylight Time, = RMaryman@aol.com writes:     > > >> Why do trackers have the mixtures buried back in the case behind the >> principals. The mixtures get a chance to blend with the organ. > > > Actually, in MOST tracker organs, the mixtures are a the back so that = the > TUNER can have access to them, and so they are not buried behind taller > ranks > that obstruct the tuner's access. (Unlike one organ where I have to tune = a >     The Martin Ott I play, the facade is the 8' Principal then the mixture is directly behind it, then the ranks in order 2' Principal 4' Principal 8' Flute. However there are two "hatches" If you look at a the website the 'shortest' sections of the facade are hinged and swing out so you can get into the organ from the front. All while on a ladder. Then the swell is tuned from a walk board and there are doors all along the back. The GT trumpet is in the swell which is in the very back but when I've had to get = up there to spot tune I've never had trouble reaching any pipe.   On another note, the guy who does our maintenance is also the one who designed the organ. He and Martin have worked together for almost 20 = years.   Travis   --part1_24.18145c13.28b2ebcb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 8/20/01 3:35:57 PM Central Daylight Time, RMaryman@aol.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Why do trackers = have the mixtures buried back in the case behind the <BR>principals. The mixtures get a chance to blend with the organ. = &nbsp;&nbsp;</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR> <BR>Actually, in MOST tracker organs, the mixtures are a the back so that = the <BR>TUNER can have access to them, and so they are not buried behind = taller <BR>ranks <BR>that obstruct the tuner's access. (Unlike one organ where I have to = tune a <BR>Scharff III thru the 8' Trompette inside the Swell) </BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR> <BR>The Martin Ott I play, the facade is the 8' Principal then the mixture = is <BR>directly behind it, then the ranks in order 2' Principal 4' Principal = 8' <BR>Flute. &nbsp;However there are two "hatches" &nbsp;If you look at a = the website the <BR>'shortest' sections of the facade are hinged and swing out so you can = get <BR>into the organ from the front. &nbsp;All while on a ladder. &nbsp;Then = the swell is <BR>tuned from a walk board and there are doors all along the back. = &nbsp;The GT <BR>trumpet is in the swell which is in the very back but when I've had to = get up <BR>there to spot tune I've never had trouble reaching any pipe. <BR> <BR>On another note, the guy who does our maintenance is also the one who <BR>designed the organ. &nbsp;He and Martin have worked together for = almost 20 years. <BR> <BR>Travis</FONT></HTML>   --part1_24.18145c13.28b2ebcb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: the cost of fine workmanship - - salesTaxes? - nope From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 15:41:59 -0700     --------------2CFA08EB8C3D11E4AE3BC338 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I think not in California, Rick ... it may be called something else, but the CALIFORNIA builder who's bidding on our project was VERY SPECIFIC .... he even excluded the parts of the organ that are being recycled, as only the new work is subject to whatever tax it is.   Cheers,   Bud   RMaryman@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 8/15/2001 7:35:40 PM Eastern Daylight Time, > quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > > > >> mostly to avoid paying additional taxes (grin) ... I think the sales >> >> tax on our organ will be something like $17K (!) > > BBBBUUUUZZZZZZ - wrong... > It is highly unlikely that your church will pay any sales tax on ANY > organ > built, Especially if done out-of-state as most state governments > EXEMPT > churches from being liable for sales and use taxes. > > Rick in VA   --------------2CFA08EB8C3D11E4AE3BC338 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> I think not in California, Rick ... it may be called something else, but the CALIFORNIA builder who's bidding on our project was VERY SPECIFIC ... he even excluded the parts of the organ that are being recycled, as only the new work is subject to whatever tax it is. <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <p>RMaryman@aol.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>In = a message dated 8/15/2001 7:35:40 PM Eastern Daylight Time,</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>quilisma@socal.rr.com = writes:</font></font> <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><font = face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>mostly to avoid paying additional taxes (grin) ... I think the = sales</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>tax on our organ will = be something like $17K (!)</font></font></blockquote>   <p><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>BBBBUUUUZZZZZZ - = wrong...</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>It is highly unlikely = that your church will pay any sales tax on ANY organ</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>built, Especially if = done out-of-state as most state governments EXEMPT</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>churches from being = liable for sales and use taxes.</font></font> <p><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>Rick&nbsp; in = VA</font></font></blockquote> </html>   --------------2CFA08EB8C3D11E4AE3BC338--