PipeChat Digest #2535 - Tuesday, December 4, 2001
 
Hallelujah, His Majesty Stands!
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Hallelujah, His Majesty Stands!
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: playing postludes - here's my solution
  by "Wayne Grauel" <wayne@eminent-usa.com>
Molto Stupido...
  by "Mandy Glass" <amadpoet@lycos.com>
Re: Anyone listen to the postlude Sunday?
  by "Michael K. Cronin" <mcronin@iag.net>
Re: Hallelujah, His Majesty Stands
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Retirement: it was great while it lasted
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: Anyone listen to the postlude Sunday?
  by "Russell Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: Retirement: it was great while it lasted
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: playing postludes - here's my solution
  by "Nance, Daryel" <DNance@svdp-edu.org>
Re: Sunday at St. Agatha's - Advent 1a
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Anyone listen to the postlude Sunday?
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Listening to Postludes.
  by "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Re: Retirement:  it was great while it lasted
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
The Postlude and The Clap
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Anyone listen to the postlude Sunday?
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Retirement:  it was great while it lasted
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: playing postludes - here's my solution
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Hallelujah, His Majesty Stands! From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 08:46:42 EST   Two prevailing theories are (1) that the King may have suffered from hemorrhoids or gastronomic disturbance and was simply uncomfortable and = (2) he thought it was the finale. No matter what, when the Crown stands, all follow suit.  
(back) Subject: Re: Hallelujah, His Majesty Stands! From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001 08:48:48 -0600   Or perhaps he was getting up to practice a little Touching for the King's = Evil.   John Speller   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > Two prevailing theories are (1) that the King may have suffered from > hemorrhoids or gastronomic disturbance and was simply uncomfortable and = (2) > he thought it was the finale. No matter what, when the Crown stands, = all > follow suit. >    
(back) Subject: Re: playing postludes - here's my solution From: "Wayne Grauel" <wayne@eminent-usa.com> Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001 10:03:24 -0500     When I was younger I always played postludes. For over 30 years I've played postlude, but during the last 10 years ( and two congregations) I have thought what a waste of time.   My thoughts are, that the service is over and people want to greet and talk, all we're doing is saying "hey... listen to me", but they don't, so what do we do.... Pick music that they will hear over shouting, weather they like it or not!... Has anyone ever played a soft prelude... probably not many... why? They'd never hear it (and you probably couldn't hear what you're playing!   So... what do they do now? They shout to each other like they're at a bar trying to talk over the DJ or the 'house music" because they can't hear each other over the organ!   What is the point?   The solution.......   At the little Lutheran church I'm at now, after the last hymn, they toll their country church bell and extinguish the candles. From the first service there I said.... "aha!... here is the perfect opportunity to try my plan!" ( You Methodists should be able to work right into something like this)   At that point, I play a gripping (meditative, contemplative) improvisation or make something up that is short and provides a meditation and final cadence. I will tell you that you could hear a pin drop during this.   For those who typically have the congregation jump up expecting a prelude, go into this directly from the hymn on the softest, lushest(??) stops you've got, keep it very short...   .... you must go right into the meditation fro the hymn at first to break their habits... You cannot give them any silence break after the hymn to trigger the stampede at the next note... they will always hold their positions until the trigger for the postlude, which obviously never comes! ... or put silent meditation in the bulletin....   Then, when you're done with your meditation and final "A-men".. ( amen makes an excellent training tool) get up... walk off!   They will stand there like deer looking at headlights for about 30 seconds until they figure out... "HEY, where did the organist go?" Then they will quietly start to walk out... guaranteed!   WOW, what a difference! I personally enjoy improvisation and have done different styles with this approach from modern- Dupre/Flor Peeters style to a recorder stop baroque improvisation!   What does the congregation do, they sit there mesmerized for the 30 seconds to 1 minute that it takes, till the final cadence, they get up (still quite) and proceed out at very modest volume.   What a relief! I have had so many people come up and tell me how wonderful it is... try it! (especially if you can improvise, or if you can temper your egos!)   Wayne   -- Wayne Grauel Eminent-USA http://www.eminent-usa.com 800.357.4545  
(back) Subject: Molto Stupido... From: "Mandy Glass" <amadpoet@lycos.com> Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001 09:13:00 -0600   Well dang. I apologize, everyone, for leaving the subject line off a post = for the second time in a row. My brain must have slipped out of an ear and = gone on an organ crawl.   Mandy :o/      
(back) Subject: Re: Anyone listen to the postlude Sunday? From: "Michael K. Cronin" <mcronin@iag.net> Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001 10:15:12 -0500     --------------571A60480D20F635A0F39CFA Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit       Wuxuzusu@aol.com wrote:   > > Greetings, > Yesterday, at the Worthington, Ohio, United Methodist Church, William > Haller played Widor's Toccata as the postlude. During his playing, > nearly one third of the congregation waited quietly, listening to his > performance. When he finished, he received a hearty round of applause. > > I notice that more people are staying to listen to the postlude, > regardless of what is played. > > Has this phemomenon happened to any one on this list? >   Stan:   I go up to a Notre Dame football game now and then, and attend Mass at Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago the next day. A few weeks ago the organist played a magnificent Bach postlude. Some of us stood and faced the choir loft as he did, and at the end applauded him. However, it was less than one-third of the church who did so.   IMO, it is very clear that there some who really appreciate a well-chosen postlude by a skilled organist on a good organ.   ___________________________ Michael K. Cronin Ormond Beach, FL http://home.iag.net/~mcronin     --------------571A60480D20F635A0F39CFA Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> &nbsp; <p>Wuxuzusu@aol.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE>&nbsp; <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font = size=3D+0>Greetings,</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D+0>Yesterday, at the = Worthington, Ohio, United Methodist Church, William Haller played Widor's Toccata as the postlude. During his playing, nearly one third of the congregation waited quietly, listening to his performance. When he finished, he = received a hearty round of applause.</font></font> <p><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D+0>I notice that more = people are staying to listen to the postlude, regardless of what is = played.</font></font> <p><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D+0>Has this phemomenon = happened to any one on this list?</font></font> <br><font face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font = size=3D+0></font></font>&nbsp;</blockquote> Stan: <p>I go up to a Notre Dame football game now and then, and attend Mass at Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago the next day. A few weeks ago the = organist played a magnificent Bach postlude. Some of us stood and faced the choir loft as he did, and at the end applauded him. However, it was less than one-third of the church who did so. <p>IMO, it is very clear that there some who really appreciate a = well-chosen postlude by a skilled organist on a good organ. <p>___________________________ <br>Michael K. Cronin <br>Ormond Beach, FL <br><A = HREF=3D"http://home.iag.net/~mcronin">http://home.iag.net/~mcronin</A> <br>&nbsp;</html>   --------------571A60480D20F635A0F39CFA--    
(back) Subject: Re: Hallelujah, His Majesty Stands From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 10:45:29 EST   While I am in agreement with the previous posts concerning the Crown = standing during the Chorus, I seem to remember from my distant college days a = recount of how this occurred. The King reportedly did not rise until "King of = Kings, Lord of Lords" was pronounced in Handel's composition. I am not sure = exactly how my professor knew this for a certainty. Probably the same way as so = many today can tell us exactly what registrations Bach used, his tempi, etc. = They were there? :)   Best wishes, Jim Pitts        
(back) Subject: Retirement: it was great while it lasted From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 11:14:52 EST   Hello to all,   To quote Gene Autry, I'm back in the saddle again. The organist who = replaced me at my retirement resigned yesterday with no notice and obviously no consideration for the church which hired her. An emergency call from the church came last night asking me to return to the bench, if not = permanently, at least through Advent and Christmas. Other than reluctance to re-enter = the weekly ritual, I could not find it in my heart to refuse their request.   Now I learn that this will be double duty as, since my departure, two churches have been joined with a common pastor (not totally unusual in the =   UMC), I will now have a 9:00 worship at one church and a 10:30 service at = the other. Fortunately, they are only about ten minutes drive time apart. = The first service will be on a large two-manual Allen card reader, very well installed and in a decent acoustic. The second will be on my old familiar =   Rodgers 220 placed in a carpet gallery. But I digress.   As the pastor uses the same sermon material in both services, we have = agreed that the music will be the same at both services. The agreement came = after my total insistence that it be thus!   I was so looking forward to Choral Eucharist on Christmas Eve at St. = Alban's. Now, I will be playing two venues and cannot attend. Bummer.   Since there has been an almost seven month absence from the bench, I will = try Wayne Grauel's suggestion for a service conclusion instead of the = traditional Postlude setting. And for those who may wonder, both churches will pay = their regularly budgeted stipend which makes the effort profitable. :)   Best wishes, Jim Pitts  
(back) Subject: Re: Anyone listen to the postlude Sunday? From: "Russell Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001 12:09:03 -0600       On 12/3/01 8:48 PM, Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > I think it's very sad when organists make such a big deal out of = something so > trivial.   On a typical Sunday at St. Andrew's, I play a rousing, rollicking = postlude. The choir has departed to the pomp and splendour of the traditional recessional hymn - a few may remain at the rear of the church from time to time. Perhaps a dozen people remain in the pews to listen, or perhaps to chat with friends or family, or perhaps just because they don't want to stand in line with the bulk of the congregation, waiting to shake hands = with the rector and the layreaders as they file out. Many of the folks in line listen to and enjoy the postlude - they've told me so.   But it's not a recital where everyone should sit and listen and then file out in silence. The postlude is EXIT MUSIC! The service is over, it's = going away time. If it serves that purpose and especially if the congregation = gets that little bit of extra inspiration as they head back to the trials and tribulations of the world, then I am well pleased.   TTFA, Russ Greene    
(back) Subject: Re: Retirement: it was great while it lasted From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 13:15:55 EST   Dear Jim   Welcome back to regular church work! :) They can take the organist out of the church, but they can't take the church out of the organist. Sorry about St. Alban's but the show must go on! Anyway look at it this way, you did have seven glorious months of planning and plotting. A nice vacation! :) Put your book and memoires on hold, it ain't over til the fat lady sings, Ahhhhhhhhh! As they say they can't keep a good man down! :)   Best wishes,   Ron Severin   PS And you thought you could get out of Christmas service planning this year. Well, Ho Ho Ho Merry Christmas!  
(back) Subject: RE: playing postludes - here's my solution From: "Nance, Daryel" <DNance@svdp-edu.org> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 14:49:42 -0600   Wayne,   I do things like this too, ...what is amazing is that I didn't know that there were any other organists who admited to feeling the same way about = how to solve these end of service dynamics.   Cool! Daryel       Daryel Nance, St.Vincent's, Houston mailto:dnance@svdp-edu.org; www.dompaulbenoit.com; www.church-organist.com; www.daryeln.com   "...the only ones among you who will really be happy are those who sought and found how to serve." Albert Schweitzer     -----Original Message----- From: Wayne Grauel [mailto:wayne@eminent-usa.com] Sent: Tuesday, December 04, 2001 9:03 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: playing postludes - here's my solution       When I was younger I always played postludes. For over 30 years I've played postlude, but during the last 10 years ( and two congregations) I have thought what a waste of time.   My thoughts are, that the service is over and people want to greet and talk, all we're doing is saying "hey... listen to me", but they don't, so what do we do.... Pick music that they will hear over shouting, weather they like it or not!... Has anyone ever played a soft prelude... probably not many... why? They'd never hear it (and you probably couldn't hear what you're playing!   So... what do they do now? They shout to each other like they're at a bar trying to talk over the DJ or the 'house music" because they can't hear each other over the organ!   What is the point?   The solution.......   At the little Lutheran church I'm at now, after the last hymn, they toll their country church bell and extinguish the candles. From the first service there I said.... "aha!... here is the perfect opportunity to try my plan!" ( You Methodists should be able to work right into something like this)   At that point, I play a gripping (meditative, contemplative) improvisation or make something up that is short and provides a meditation and final cadence. I will tell you that you could hear a pin drop during this.   For those who typically have the congregation jump up expecting a prelude, go into this directly from the hymn on the softest, lushest(??) stops you've got, keep it very short...   .... you must go right into the meditation fro the hymn at first to break their habits... You cannot give them any silence break after the hymn to trigger the stampede at the next note... they will always hold their positions until the trigger for the postlude, which obviously never comes! ... or put silent meditation in the bulletin....   Then, when you're done with your meditation and final "A-men".. ( amen makes an excellent training tool) get up... walk off!   They will stand there like deer looking at headlights for about 30 seconds until they figure out... "HEY, where did the organist go?" Then they will quietly start to walk out... guaranteed!   WOW, what a difference! I personally enjoy improvisation and have done different styles with this approach from modern- Dupre/Flor Peeters style to a recorder stop baroque improvisation!   What does the congregation do, they sit there mesmerized for the 30 seconds to 1 minute that it takes, till the final cadence, they get up (still quite) and proceed out at very modest volume.   What a relief! I have had so many people come up and tell me how wonderful it is... try it! (especially if you can improvise, or if you can temper your egos!)   Wayne   -- Wayne Grauel Eminent-USA http://www.eminent-usa.com 800.357.4545   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Sunday at St. Agatha's - Advent 1a From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 17:28:28 EST   gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com wrote:       > Thankfully it did not > impede today's service playing, but I'm sore and > wondering how to balance on > to my step stool and hang ornaments.   Glenda,   It's easy - you simply stand on the floor and direct someone else on the = step stool. Hope your knee feels better!   Vicki  
(back) Subject: Re: Anyone listen to the postlude Sunday? From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 17:42:19 EST   manderusa@earthlink.net wrote:       > . I simply love to play, and my skin is thick enough to > put out of mind whatever level of raucous noise there > might be.   I was actually asked to stop in the middle of my short postlude, as a = deacon had decided to call an impromptu meeting. He came up and thumped me on = the shoulder to get my attention.   I am going to stay as organist through the Christmas season, as a point of =   honor. I will NOT dump a congregation just before Christmas. But I am = gone as of the first of the year.   Vicki  
(back) Subject: Listening to Postludes. From: "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 18:04:42 -0500   I belong to a church in suburban Rochester (Fairport UMC) where the = postlude is heard by almost everyone remaining in the pews. The benediction is = given by one of our pastors while the congregation is seated, followed = immediately by the postlude. The acolyte, pastors, layreaders and the choir recesses during the last part of the postlude. The congregation remains seated = until the end of the postlude.   Many times the congregation has given a standing ovation after a particularly difficult postlude before leaving the sanctuary. Our = organists have been fine musicians and have been appreciated and supported by the pastors, staff and parishioners.   Isn't every church like this?   Just a member in the pews, Ken Evans    
(back) Subject: Re: Retirement: it was great while it lasted From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 18:17:59 EST   Ron Severin writes:   >Welcome back to regular church work! <<   Hardly! Appeasing one congregation is fairly regular but now I have two = to babysit. The second parish that I <inherited> may have been the founding church for Methodists in the USA. General topics of discussion (small = talk) are the latest styles of walkers, crutches, and wheelchairs. They are = very well heeled and used to having their own way in all matters of life. Now = I am no spring chicken but among this group I am considerably their junior. =     In a meeting with the staff/parish relationship committees of the churches =   this afternoon, I learned that both parishes will remain distinctly = separate for a calendar year. Then, it will be decided if the two are melded into one parish (if there are any survivors). Its already contentious and will probably get = more so in coming weeks.   One of the more aged matriarchs informed me privately that "I don't cotton = to no woman preacher." I shall not share this highly educated utterance with =   the newly appointed pastor who is obviously female, stunningly pretty, and = as bullheaded as any among her adopted elderly flock. This may be fun to = watch. :)   Lord, give me patience - and give it to me RIGHT NOW!! But thanks again = for the kind thoughts, Ron. At my age, regularity is a sought after = attribute, even in church work.   Best to all, Jim Pitts              
(back) Subject: The Postlude and The Clap From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 18:43:02 EST     --part1_13e.59dafea.293eb986_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/3/01 10:31:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, Cremona502@cs.com writes:   > About half of our congregation stays, and renders applause afterwards. >     Now, THAT is SOME appreciative congregation indeed if they are sharing = THAT MUCH with the organist in return for a triumphant sortie following morning =   worship! (Don't they make penicillin for that kind of thing?) LOL!   Scott Foppiano   --part1_13e.59dafea.293eb986_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/3/01 10:31:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, Cremona502@cs.com writes: <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">About half of our = congregation stays, and renders applause afterwards. &nbsp;Someday I'm = going to stand up and thank them for the clap. </BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR> <BR>Now, THAT is SOME appreciative congregation indeed if they are sharing = THAT MUCH with the organist in return for a triumphant sortie following = morning worship! &nbsp;(Don't they make penicillin for that kind of = thing?) <BR>LOL! <BR> <BR>Scott Foppiano</FONT></HTML>   --part1_13e.59dafea.293eb986_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Anyone listen to the postlude Sunday? From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 18:44:41 EST     --part1_155.533ef08.293eb9e9_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   For the time being and for at least the near future I am at Plaza Presbyterian Church in Charlotte, North Carolina.   Scott Foppiano   --part1_155.533ef08.293eb9e9_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>For the time being and = for at least the near future I am at Plaza Presbyterian Church in = Charlotte, North Carolina. <BR> <BR>Scott Foppiano</FONT></HTML>   --part1_155.533ef08.293eb9e9_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Retirement: it was great while it lasted From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 19:05:14 EST   Hi Jim   This may not be a bad thing! If they are all parading around in the latest of designer walkers and wheel chairs, It may be a boon to the funeral business. Hey Brian, you need to absorb this. Let's see, by next year it could conceivably be one congregation, the minister is much younger, and four or five funerals a week should take very good care of things. At $150.00 a pop you'll be a rich man, and can retire in style at the end of next year. I Can't Believe I Wrote That!~   It's a thought,   Ron Severin   PS I can just hear those old, cumugeous women now!, "Over my dead body!" Time heals all wounds! :)  
(back) Subject: Re: playing postludes - here's my solution From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 19:20:23 EST     --part1_b7.17e037a4.293ec247_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/4/01 10:10:33 AM Eastern Standard Time, wayne@eminent-usa.com writes:     > ... you must go right into the meditation fro the hymn at first to break > their habits... (snip) > WOW, what a difference! I personally enjoy improvisation and have done > different styles with this approach from modern- Dupre/Flor Peeters > style to a recorder stop baroque improvisation! (snip) > What a relief! I have had so many people come up and tell me how > wonderful it is... try it! (especially if you can improvise, or if you > can temper your egos!) >   Wayne, That's an excellent idea, and is slightly reminiscent of what is done in Christian Science Churches.... a "tag" on the end of the hymn to cover = the noise of people sitting down. In one parish, the organist would use improvisation for both prelude and postlude. The prelude began quietly, = as if from nowhere, and then progressed through whatever gymnastics were = running through his head at the time. The conclusion of the prelude was the introduction to the the processional hymn which followed the ringing of = the tower bell. His prelude conclusions were always in keys compatible in = some way with the bell.   The postlude immediately grew from the conclusion of the hymn either by = grand extension or release of the final majestic chord with only one note on a = very quiet stop held over as a thin thread, pulled, and then woven into the = fabric of the postlude. It's a grand way to end a service.   Actually, I enjoy improvisations in worship more than literature.   Good work, Wayne.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_b7.17e037a4.293ec247_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/4/01 10:10:33 AM Eastern Standard Time, wayne@eminent-usa.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">... you must go = right into the meditation fro the hymn at first to break <BR>their habits... &nbsp;&nbsp;(snip) <BR>WOW, what a difference! &nbsp;I personally enjoy improvisation and = have done <BR>different styles with this approach from modern- Dupre/Flor Peeters <BR>style to a recorder stop baroque improvisation! &nbsp;&nbsp;(snip) <BR>What a relief! &nbsp;I have had so many people come up and tell me how <BR>wonderful it is... &nbsp;&nbsp;try it! (especially if you can = improvise, or if you <BR>can temper your egos!) <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Wayne, <BR>That's an excellent idea, and is slightly reminiscent of what is done = in Christian Science Churches.... &nbsp;a "tag" on the end of the hymn to = cover the noise of people sitting down. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;In = one parish, the organist would use improvisation for both prelude and = postlude. &nbsp;&nbsp;The prelude began quietly, as if from nowhere, and = then progressed through whatever gymnastics were running through his head = at the time. &nbsp;The conclusion of the prelude was the introduction to = the the processional hymn which followed the ringing of the tower bell. = &nbsp;His prelude conclusions were always in keys compatible in some way = with the bell. <BR> <BR>The postlude immediately grew from the conclusion of the hymn either = by grand extension or release of the final majestic chord with only one = note on a very quiet stop held over as a thin thread, pulled, and then = woven into the fabric of the postlude. &nbsp;&nbsp;It's a grand way to end a service. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Actually, I enjoy improvisations in worship more than literature. <BR> <BR>Good work, Wayne. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_b7.17e037a4.293ec247_boundary--