PipeChat Digest #2538 - Wednesday, December 5, 2001
 
RE: Mixtures - stupid question
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: (No Subject)
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Wedding music for Mandy
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
The Postlude
  by "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com>
Mixture tuning hints (Longish)
  by "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net>
French translation for Balbastre Noel
  by "Wayne Grauel" <wayne@eminent-usa.com>
Building a Library of Organ Music
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Mixture tuning hints (Longish)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Seattle Rosales on CD; New Charles Callahan CD
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Mixture tuning hints (Longish)
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Re: postludes
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: (No Subject)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Mixtures - stupid question From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 17:10:54 -0500   >why not just use 36 pipes and wire it up to repeat right on up??? I suppose there would be voicing issues in the different ranges, but on a little unit organ, maybe it could be made to work, or just a little bell-like sparkle to reside on top of a couple of regular mixtures. Would the relays and such cost more than the pipes needed? Just a silly question that has nagged. Has anyone ever tried this?   Yes, Dick ____, the builder of the organ at S. Peter's, Medford, NJ, makes pipework go a long way with such tricks. This is a rather small = instrument hooked up to a handsome four-manual E.M. Skinner console. There is space for many more pipes in the chambers than now exist, and big plans to = enlarge the organ one of these years when someone gives the church a couple = hundred thousand-- we know how that goes. Meanwhile (based on substituting there for a Sunday or two) I was impressed by how much is cleverly made of how little, as long as one understands it as a temporary expedient. PIPORG-L members Clifford Bohnson, who used to be the organist, or Felix Hell, who now lives in Medford and has performed there several times, could provide more details.    
(back) Subject: RE: (No Subject) From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 17:31:41 -0500   At least 95% of the population would be hard-pressed to name a single = piece of genuine organ music if asked, notwithstanding that they may have = attended church every Sunday for years, and thus have heard hundreds of voluntaries each carefully identified in a bulletin. If and when they get their one = big chance in a lifetime to order up what they want from an organ, you can pretty well depend on it that they'll want only stuff = begged/borrowed/stolen from other media, rather than a single scrap of "organ music in its = original form." I find this this a very discouraging point to ponder, but all one can do is keep soldiering on. So when we're talking about wedding music, we're talking about transcriptions.   For what it's worth, Concordia publishes a two-volume collection of so-called wedding music that includes the Clarke/Purcell Trumpet Tune and Trumpet Voluntary and Marcello's Psalm 19. This is a very useful = anthology altogether (although I somewhat prefer E. Power Biggs's arrangement of the Marcello in his Treasury of Early Organ Music), not only for weddings but for general purposes-- especially volume 1, comprising free pieces. = Volume 2 is made up of hymn-tune-based pieces, including Karg-Elert's famous Nun Danket.   I'd guess that these books would satisfy your teacher's standards-- = although since any volume that gives you what you will need for weddings will = contain transcriptions, we are inevitably on shaky academic ground for a purist.        
(back) Subject: RE: Wedding music for Mandy From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 17:51:39 -0500   In his recent post, Bruce Cornelly wrote:   >How ever do students today manage to build a library with the exorbitant prices being charged for organ music?   Maybe this is why improvisation is a better-known art in America than it = was when I was a student. My theory is that the French are the world's best improvisateurs because French music publishers are the world's priciest. ;-)   There are publishers who endeavor to provide good value by reprinting old editions of the standard repertoire. In my youth this meant Kalmus, and I eventually acquired most of the organ music that they published-- quite a bulk. Most of this is still available, although I understand that in some cases the expansion of copyright law, such that some music went from copyright to public domain and back into copyright, has curtailed their operations. Enough comes from Dover to amass several white cliffs of = music for yourself, and now there is also the Masters Music series. Music = prices are certainly a problem, but I'm not sure that students have it that much worse now than in my day, when I might think I could afford a coveted = $3-$6 volume, or I might wistfully leave it on the dealer's shelf. Of course, = now one wishes that one had yielded to the tempation a little more often, because $3 sounds like a trivial sum, but it wasn't then, even for someone who had decided to commit a significant ongoing budget to buying music. = The prices for many things, not just music, have increased five-to-tenfold = since the 60s.   All teachers who are successful in inculcating the importance of building comprehensive libraries, and preferably in legitimate ways, deserve = feathers in their caps.   Paul    
(back) Subject: The Postlude From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2001 04:56:13 -0800 (PST)   I was deeply moved by Steve Lawson's summation on why we play postludes. I think we need to send people out into the world dancing on air at the end of a service - make them feel really good about having been in church. At St. Peter's we send them out to organ and bells. I try to play something way uplifting and even while it is going on, my wife is upstairs in the tower competing for your ear with her 3 1/2 ton chime. I just love that wonderful sound of coming out of church and hearing the organ receding into the background and changes on bells coming into your consciousness as you depart. Therefore I don't really care if people prefer to hear every note of my postlude or have that other experience. Plenty of people do stay till the last note and then they applaud. I don't know how i feel about applause in a church service, but the folks at my church do it, and I always appreciate and acknowledge it. It's just their way of saying what a great uplifting service it was, not just the postlude. I insist that my choir remain in their seats (rear gallery) till the postlude finishes, and if someone is talking during it, I speak to them afterwards. It's just too hard to play with nearby distractions. I don't even hear the small amount of talk from downstairs. As churches go, my congregation is incredibly quiet during pre and postludes. I have played in places where you would have thought you were in a train station at rush hour.   I am reminded of a story about a minister in a tiny country church who came to church and found only one old bib-overalled farmer sitting there, and noone else. He celebrated the service as usual, but when he came to the sermon, he asked the farmer if he should preach his sermon for just him. The old farmer said: "Well the way I see it, if I went out to the barn to feed the cows and there was just one there, I think I'd feed it." The minister was humbled by this great insight and proceeded to preach his very long prepared sermon. Afterwards, the farmer said to him: "You know I said if I went out to the barn and there was just one cow there I'd feed it? Well I don't think I'd give her the whole dang load!"   Ken   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Kenneth Potter, Organist/Director of Music St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square, Bronx, NY 845/358-2528 <swell_shades@yahoo.com>, Austin Op. 2097 at: = http://www.nycago.org/Organs/html/StPetersEpBronx.html =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Buy the perfect holiday gifts at Yahoo! Shopping. http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Mixture tuning hints (Longish) From: "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2001 07:36:43 -0600   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Now you've got to tune them. Make sure the tempered tuning > rank is dead on equal temperment usually a 4' principal. Put in > one row at a time of your mixture and tune them dead on. Handle > the mixture pipes with thick cloth gloves so as not to transmit heat > of your hand to them. Let each row stand for a few minutes to equalize > to room temp and tune them. You may need to touch up some of them. > This can take several hours to do the first time. The tuning tool needs > to be thin enough not to jar tuners on adjacent pipes. Have Fun!   After reading this, I felt compelled to add some comments.   A typical Mixture is arranged to stand on a channeled board; one channel for each key on the Keyboard and then holes are drilled above each channel to receive however many ranks of Mixture pipes there are.   What this means is that, unless it is a "wired" mixture, or one which uses a magnet for every PIPE, VS one magnet for every NOTE (BIG difference!) the every pipe for any given note in the entire Mixture stop receives its wind from one magnet.   That being the case, if one adopts Ron's suggested method of installing and tuning the Mixture, one will most certainly encounter what builders call "robbing" of the Wind, in that the open Toe-holes which do not have pipes in place will permit a greater amount of wind to escape than would be the case whenever all of the pipes are in place. Thus, whatever pipes are on the Mixture Toeboard will note receive their normal compliment of wind and thus be flat in pitch.   What happens then is that as each subsequent rank is added, the other pipes will begin to receive additional amounts of wind than they did with the added pipes were missing and thus speak louder, and sharper in pitch. In other words: the previously-tuned pipes will then be OUT of tune!   Following this scenario to its logical conclusion once all of the pipes are in place, one will at once realize that when all of the pipes are in place, NONE of them will be in tune! In short: a real nightmare.   What is customarily done when tuning Mixtures is to "stop off" or silence, those pipes which are not being tuned as one progresses up the scale and tunes all of the pipes for any given note. This has been often done by putting cotton in the mouths or tops of the pipes. I highly DISCOURAGE this practice, in that it introduces wisps of cotton into the mouths of the pipes and thus interferes with speech, as the cotton has a way of snagging any jagged edges in the pipe mouths or Languids.   A much better practice would be to make what I term "Mixture Mops". They are very simple to construct and a sizable set of them to tune basically any mixture can be fashioned in the following manner:   Take and cut a number of small-diameter Dowel Rods (1/8" and 3/16" are good sizes to work with) and then punch out a number of different diameter leather disks from some thin to medium Pouch Leather. Put a dab of either carpenter's or Hot Glue (in this case: it really doesn't matter!) on the end of the Dowel and then place the leather punching on the end of the dowel, so that it looks kind of like a Parasol or Daisy.   Following is an ASCII Sketch of same: | | = =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D| Dowel Rod* |<--Leather disk Punching** (*Vary length to suit pipe size) |   (**Vary diameter to suit pipe scale)   The idea is to make a number of these with larger-diameter/longer-length dowels attached to larger diameter leather punchings and vise-versa. Obviously, one must take into consideration the length of the pipes one anticipates encountering, and allowing some extra length beyond that so that the Mop extends beyond the top of the pipe to facilitate easy manipulation as one moves them from pipe-to-pipe during the course of tuning.   For small pipes, a number of ready-made items readily lend themselves to service: pipe cleaners and those various diameter "fuzzy" colored wires that one finds in craft stores are wonderful.   Now, to proceed tuning using this method: all pipes are in place and one begins at the bottom of the keyboard (or Mixture compass) with the appropriate mops in place in all but the first note of the Mixture. The idea being that when one inserts the leather end of the Mixture Mop into the pipe, the leather "flap" covers the windway and thus silences the pipe from speaking, but doesn't in any way change the pipe's "wind consumption" and thus doesn't affect its neighbors on the same Note Channel.   After the first pipe of the Mixture is tuned to the Octave 4' (the usual tuning stop for this work) then the mop in the next pitch in the same note is withdrawn and inserted into the next pipe for the same pitch up the scale. Then, since the first pipe is (presumably) in tune, then one is listening for beats only from the second pipe and those of the first pipe are no longer noticed since they are not (or should not be!) beating anymore.   Proceed in like manner for any remaining pipes for a given note in the Mixture; simply working up the scale.   It will be here that it will become immediately apparent if any pipes are "fluttering" or otherwise not speaking correctly. If the pipes are not speaking solidly, no amount of work will correct bad pipe speech by tuning, and one may find out that what was first mistaken as a Mixture "out of tune" is really a Mixture with bad pipe voicing!   I have Jerroll Adams of Milan Michigan to thank for the "concept" of these Mixture Mops. Many, many years ago, early in my career, he left me a sample of this mop in an instrument I used to maintain.   A word of caution: if one is in a situation where the Mops are not taken out on the job, a stand with holes which allow the leather disks to sit with the dowels hanging through the holes will keep the leather disks in good shape. Otherwise, a good idea for carrying them in a tool box is to make heavy cardboard "backer" disks with center holes which one slips up the dowel behind the leather disks to keep them from getting creased or otherwise disfigured while stored in a toolbox.   Hopefully, this will be of some usefulness to someone.   Faithfully,   Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: French translation for Balbastre Noel From: "Wayne Grauel" <wayne@eminent-usa.com> Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2001 08:59:12 -0500   Can anyone give me a literal translation for the Noel:   Au jo deu de pubelle   thanks, Wayne     -- Wayne Grauel Eminent-USA http://www.eminent-usa.com 800.357.4545  
(back) Subject: Building a Library of Organ Music From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2001 10:45:34 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org>   << Enough comes from Dover to amass several white cliffs of music for yourself >>   I am presenting this for nomination for the 2001 Pipechat literary prize, humor category!   << All teachers who are successful in inculcating the importance of building comprehensive libraries, and preferably in legitimate ways, deserve = feathers in their caps. >>   Fenner Douglass's first assignment for all his new students at Oberlin = when I showed up there in 1953 was a trip to the Oberlin Coop Bookstore to pick up the Kalmus reprints of the old Peters complete Bach in nine volumes, at $1 per volume! Two or three of the covers had been mislabelled, so Fenner, who always knew how to make a deal, got them as "shop worn" for that, even at that time, astonishing price. They were/are very sturdy, and have stood up reasonably well for almost fifty years! I have replaced a few volumes, which shows I do practice! It's the volumes with all the difficult pieces that are in the best condition! We were also sent to the old Bach Gesellschaft in the library to make comparisons and occasionally changes = in certain works, where it differed from the Peters. Fenner with feathers in his cap? There must be a better way!   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler              
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture tuning hints (Longish) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2001 11:58:34 EST   Hi Richard   There's a big 80 rank Moeller in Long Beach, CA that has a 5 rank harmonics mixture on it. There is a five position dial on the console to block off higher ranks if desired. the composition was 12, 15, 17, 19, flat21. Would they have used magnets for every pipe valve or used a slider to block off individual ranks? It was built in the mid 50's and it wasn't your typical Moeller. It was definately a reform movement organ, and there were a lot of custom innovations on it.   I thought it was very unusual, so I thought you'd like to comment.   I've always felt since seeing the Harmonics mixture that individual = sliders might make tuning mixtures a lot easier. The first time is of course the most exacting and critical. Then there were some truely gifted voicer, tuners that could voice and tune without silencing any pipes and getting it right. The successful most satisfying mixtures are those which seem quite soft by themselves, but when added to the Diapason Chorus, set up quite a nice blaze of color.   Wired mixtures, the most successful that I've heard, came off a soft = Dulciana or Aeoline rank. On a very small organ, sometimes it's the best that can be done. At anyrate, it's amazing how soft mixtures have to be, and how much fire they can ignite.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Seattle Rosales on CD; New Charles Callahan CD From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2001 12:03:33 -0500   Katharine Pardee plays the beautiful Rosales organ at St. James Cathedral, Seattle, in the first (and brand new) CD of the organ that so captured the audience at the 2000 AGO national convention. The (4m) Rosales in the Chancel shares the marvellously resonant space with the 3m Hutchings-Votey of 1907 in the West Gallery. Both are heard on the CD, together as played from the front console, and separately. Katharine Pardee plays three works of Joseph Jongen, the Sonata in G minor of Edgar Tinel as well as his Improvisata, Franck Fantaisie in A, and the Flor Peeters Toccata, Fugue et Hymne sur Ave Maris Stella.   Charles Callahan has a brand-new CD to complement reissues of two of his earlier recordings. The new CD is recorded on the Robert Turner organ at the Church of the Holy Family in New York. Entitled "Reverie," the interesting program of many quieter, introspective works, includes = composers Karg-Elert, Cesar Cui, von Henselt, Widor, Gounod, Ambroise Thomas, = Salome, Boellmann, Wolstenholme, Parry, Hollins, Barnes, Coke-Jephcott, = Bornschein, Boex, Purvis, Dethier, and Lefebure-Wely.   These CDs are available on the opening page at http://www.ohscatalog.org   Dr. Callahan's earlier recordings, "Guilmant Garnishes," and the organ sonatas of Charles Stanford, are also available from the OHS Catalog and = on the website. They are best found by using the on-site search engine to search on "callahan." Or, find the Stanford CD under Recordings of = English Music and find the Guilmant CD under Recordings of French Music.   Thanks.   Bill   Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: Mixture tuning hints (Longish) From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2001 12:33:06 EST     --part1_73.173b3f18.293fb452_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Ron and list.....   I have never seen the Moller in question. However based on other Mollers = of the same era that I maintain, I would be quite sure that the organ is on pitman chests. Therefore it would have a separate stopaction for each = rank of the mixture rather than all of the ranks being on common boring in the toeboard. At least that is the most likely way that it would have been = done.   Bill Hesterman   --part1_73.173b3f18.293fb452_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3>Hi Ron and = list.....<BR> <BR> I have never seen the Moller in question.&nbsp; However based on other = Mollers of the same era that I maintain, I would be quite sure that the = organ is on pitman chests.&nbsp; Therefore it would have a separate = stopaction for each rank of the mixture rather than all of the ranks being = on common boring in the toeboard.&nbsp; At least that is the most likely = way that it would have been done.<BR> <BR> Bill Hesterman</FONT></HTML>   --part1_73.173b3f18.293fb452_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: postludes From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2001 12:59:03 EST     --part1_6.20537491.293fba67_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Thanks for sharing your experiences, Rev'd Dr. Sir....   Have you thought of being cloned and leasing your little selves to support =   yourself in retirement. You certainly are a gem and I'm sure were/are = much appreciated by those who serve with you.   Happy retirement!   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_6.20537491.293fba67_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Thanks for sharing your = experiences, Rev'd Dr. Sir.... <BR> <BR>Have you thought of being cloned and leasing your little selves to = support yourself in retirement. &nbsp;&nbsp;You certainly are a gem and = I'm sure were/are much appreciated by those who serve with you. <BR> <BR>Happy retirement! <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_6.20537491.293fba67_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: (No Subject) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2001 13:13:21 EST     --part1_7f.1e685332.293fbdc1_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/5/01 7:16:06 AM Eastern Standard Time, pemmons@wcupa.edu writes:     > For what it's worth, Concordia publishes a two-volume collection of > so-called wedding music that includes the Clarke/Purcell Trumpet Tune = and > Trumpet Voluntary and Marcello's Psalm 19. This is a very useful = anthology > altogether (although I somewhat prefer E. Power Biggs's arrangement of = the > Marcello in his Treasury of Early Organ Music), not only for weddings = but > for general purposes-- especially volume 1, comprising free pieces.   The inclusion of the Rheinberger "Cantilena" is worth the price of the = entire volume I . This volume introduced me to so much literature. And I still = use it for my own enjoyment. This book will NEVER be sold!! ... and I'm = still using my original beat up, dog-eared, and coffee-stained edition.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_7f.1e685332.293fbdc1_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/5/01 7:16:06 AM Eastern Standard Time, pemmons@wcupa.edu writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">For what it's = worth, Concordia publishes a two-volume collection of <BR>so-called wedding music that includes the Clarke/Purcell Trumpet Tune = and <BR>Trumpet Voluntary and Marcello's Psalm 19. &nbsp;This is a very useful = anthology <BR>altogether (although I somewhat prefer E. Power Biggs's arrangement of = the <BR>Marcello in his Treasury of Early Organ Music), not only for weddings = but <BR>for general purposes-- especially volume 1, comprising free pieces. = &nbsp;</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>The inclusion of the Rheinberger "Cantilena" is worth the price of the = entire volume I . &nbsp;This volume introduced me to so much literature. = &nbsp;And I still use it for my own enjoyment. &nbsp;&nbsp;This book will = NEVER be sold!! &nbsp;... and I'm still using my original beat up, = dog-eared, and coffee-stained edition. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_7f.1e685332.293fbdc1_boundary--