PipeChat Digest #2568 - Thursday, December 13, 2001
 
Re: Jeff's Cornet
  by "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk>
Re: Ross' comments about the Cornet
  by "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk>
TEST -- delete now
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: imitation
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: the same argument
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Assuring our future
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Assuring our future
  by "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@earthlink.net>
-=3D[ radio.free.365 ::: back on the air! ]=3D-
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #2539 - 12/05/01
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Dolce Cornets
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
things
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Cornet -- Stop List included---delete if not interested
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Assuring our future
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: Ross' comments about the Cornet
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Organs of St. Paul's Cathedral, London
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Jeff's Cornet From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 10:29:11 -0000   From Bud - < --------------------------- > That said, I hasten to add that the 19th century Anglo-American >** "Dolce" Cornet** (usually composed of Dulciana-ish pipes throughout) was/is also > very useful in organs of somewhat larger size, to color the Swell 8' > strings, flutes, and even the Oboe.   I was interested in this, not having encountered it thus far. Bud, what do you make of the word 'Dolce' here? Is it used to show inclusion of actual Dolce rank(s) ? Or is it a posh form of Dulciana Mixture? Or is it used as a descriptive of gentler tone?   I know that in mid 19th century, Schulze was predominantly responsible for raising the profile of the (German) Dolce in English organ building, developing upon Snetzler's original work. The ensuing constant confusion between the Italian descriptive 'dolce', and the English/German 'Dolce', has diverted many a conversation, often where the real topic was in fact Dulciana!   Chris B    
(back) Subject: Re: Ross' comments about the Cornet From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 10:46:41 -0000   From John Speller - > --------------------- > Traditionally, the Cornet was mounted on a separate windchest so that it had > a common wind source and the five ranks would cohere more efficiently   [sigh]   It's alright for you lot with your forests of pipes sticking up all over the place ! Spare a thought for we unfortunates who, confronted with a requirement for a 'cornet' registration, can only look at a hundred year old Vox H, a four foot flute, a Dulciana Mixt, and a terminally temperamental swell Oboe. 'Struth!' It's only a Geigen Diapason short of what passes for 'Full Swell' on most of the organs I play hereabouts!   Still, is's nice to read about what might have been..................   [spit], [jealous], [pfffft] <gg>   Chris B    
(back) Subject: TEST -- delete now From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 07:39:34 -0600   no message here! sorry for the interruption...  
(back) Subject: Re: imitation From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 06:00:20 -0800   Ross said:> The vast majority of organs of small to moderate size do not have a Cor Anglais, or a Viola da Gamba   Cor Anglais, maybe, but you are not altogether correct about the Viola da Gamba. Our biggest builder (West Australia) built about 30 organs ranging from one to 20+ ranks extended. one of his basic stops was a Gamba. Another local builder who also built around 25 organs used a Viola as a basic rank in some of his organs. In others they used a salicional which is also a string rank.   I don't know where your remarks about early string ensembles comes into the picture. We were talking about imitative organ stops not string ensembles or early music groups. As Russ said the evidence that organ builders were imitating the orchestral instruments is overwhelming. Bob Elms. Bob Elms.     Russ Greene wrote: > > On 12/11/01 9:54 PM, Ross Wards wrote: > > The organ Oboe doesn't sound like an instrument of the > orchestra, and the Trumpet of the orchestra is more > organ-Horn-toned than an organ Trumpet. It is not meant to > sound the same. The vast majority of organs of small to > moderate size do not have a Cor Anglais, or a Viola da Gamba > or those things. Too, you've ignored my points about > Dulciana vs Salicional tone, Cornet vs Sesquialtera, and so > on. > I know the Viola da Gamba well, as a close friend plays one > in early-music ensembles. It just doesn't sound like an > organ Viola da Gamba, except very superficially. Why? > Because an organ string stop isn't, and can't be imitative, > as it's a flue not a box with strings on it played by a bow. > > Oh for goodness sake Ross, read your history! Of course organ Oboes > were meant to sound like real oboes and organ Trumpets were meant to > sound like real trumpets and yes indeed organ Strings and Celestes > were meant to imitate as closely as possible the sound of real > strings. Organ history is filled with documentation proving that > beyond reasonable doubt. The fact that these imitative stops don=92t > replicate the real thing was, to use computer terminology, a bug, not > a feature. It=92s only in this century that we=92ve tried, erroneously, = to > say that organ builders intended to miss the mark. > > Russ  
(back) Subject: Re: the same argument From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 06:16:41 -0800   Hey Ross, what does Lynda say about all this? Bob Elms.   > On Sun, 09 December 2001, "Ross & Lynda Wards" wrote: > > > electronics are like that - they are frauds, they are > > not wind instruments. >  
(back) Subject: Re: Assuring our future From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 11:17:34 EST   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:       > We also know that there > has never been a church in which there REALLY was > no room for a pipe organ   Granted, a pipe organ is the ideal.   OK, Sebastian - where would you put a pipe organ in this room:   Approximately 20 x 30, 8' ceilings. Front of church is divided into three =   spaces: small pastor's study, small altar/pulpit area, and even smaller choir stalls. There is a lovely stained glass window centered over the altar. Pews are generally full on Sunday morning, so removing some is not = an option. Church is so short of money that they're currently settling for = a Conn Rhapsody, no external speakers. Right now, they're worried about = coming up with the money to repair the roof.   Ideas?   Vicki  
(back) Subject: Re: Assuring our future From: "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 11:28:47 -0500   I'm having my entire kitchen torn out (including the roof) to install a = Mander!! ;o)   Myosotis51@aol.com wrote:   > TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > > > We also know that there > > has never been a church in which there REALLY was > > no room for a pipe organ > > Granted, a pipe organ is the ideal. > > OK, Sebastian - where would you put a pipe organ in this room: > > Approximately 20 x 30, 8' ceilings. Front of church is divided into = three > spaces: small pastor's study, small altar/pulpit area, and even smaller > choir stalls. There is a lovely stained glass window centered over the > altar. Pews are generally full on Sunday morning, so removing some is = not an > option. Church is so short of money that they're currently settling = for a > Conn Rhapsody, no external speakers. Right now, they're worried about = coming > up with the money to repair the roof. > > Ideas? > > Vicki > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: -=3D[ radio.free.365 ::: back on the air! ]=3D- From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 11:37:37 EST   I got this in the mail.....     > >Hi, Internet Radio Fans - > > > >Yes, it's true... > > > >After a few harrowing days (and some histrionic > press), > >the Live365 service is back up and running! > > > >If you missed Live365 during the outage, and want > to > >help ensure the future of the service, be sure to > listen > >a lot, and tell everyone you know to listen a lot, > too! > > > >You can also support our advertisers, and refer > >anyone you know who might be interested in > broadcasting > >with us! > > > >Thanks for your support, and happy holidays... > > > >cheers, > >j betty ray=A0 > >editor | live365      
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2539 - 12/05/01 From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 12:08:00 EST   ken_earl01@hotmail.com wrote:       > On that point though, why do most brides wear > white??? > > 'cos most major kitchen apppliances are white!!     Well, THAT would explain why second-time-around brides DON'T wear white!!!  
(back) Subject: Dolce Cornets From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 09:30:48 -0800   I defer to the organ-builders on this one (grin). I think it depends on the builder. I've encountered at least one Hook & Hastings (1900) in which the Swell "Dolce" Cornet was right on the edge of being big enough to serve as a normal French Cornet de Recit. OTOH, I've encountered some E.M. Skinners (and others) where it was just big enough to add some "bite" to the massed strings.   I don't recall encountering the Dolce STOP as anything other than a Dulciana, basically, so I'd be interested in hearing what Schulze did with it ... don't recall reading anything about that, but Senior Moments abound (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Chris Baker wrote:   > >From Bud - > < --------------------------- > > That said, I hasten to add that the 19th century Anglo-American > >** "Dolce" Cornet** (usually composed of Dulciana-ish pipes > throughout) was/is also > > very useful in organs of somewhat larger size, to color the Swell 8' > > strings, flutes, and even the Oboe. > > I was interested in this, not having encountered it thus far. > Bud, what do you make of the word 'Dolce' here? > Is it used to show inclusion of actual Dolce rank(s) ? > Or is it a posh form of Dulciana Mixture? > Or is it used as a descriptive of gentler tone? > > I know that in mid 19th century, Schulze was predominantly responsible > for raising the profile of the (German) Dolce in English organ > building, developing upon Snetzler's original work. The ensuing > constant confusion between the Italian descriptive 'dolce', and the > English/German 'Dolce', has diverted many a conversation, often where > the real topic was in fact Dulciana! > > Chris B > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: things From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 08:52:03 +1300   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00AF_01C1847C.9A158FC0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Dear all, Sorry, folks, if I've sounded like an aggressive know-all since joining = =3D this List. The response has been most interesting, with a number of =3D private emails coming my way, some to say, "Cool it, or we'll filter you = =3D out," and others "Keep at it, don't stop." Oh well. :-) It may be partly because I'm a NZer, and we have very vigorous ways of =3D arguing, that I've used what is seen by two or three as intemperate and = =3D arrogant language. Sorry if that's so - and stick with me, I'm not the =3D ogre some of you might think. As for getting on with my organists - =3D believe me, we've always got along exceedingly well and I've made sure =3D money is spent on both organ and organist.=3D20 Please, don't include my good wife Lynda in any of this. (grin) I'm not = =3D sure how her name comes at all onto my postings, but Lynda is not an =3D organist at all and doesn't want to be.=3D20 One or two of you have emailed me as "Father." Please don't. In the =3D Anglican Church in NZ, very different from your ECUSA, about 1 in 200 of = =3D the Anglican clergy call themselves that, entirely self-given as it has = =3D no status whatever in our Church. I'm "Ross" to everyone, small kids and = =3D wrinklies alike. Forget the Ross-the-retired-Vicar bit - I'm a colleague = =3D and (I do really hope) friend here on this List. I think there is a distinction between the Gamba and the Viola da Gamba = =3D in tone and construction. In my experience, a Viola da Gamba is of =3D bigger scale, lower and wider mouth, and is not as "hard" in tone as a =3D Gamba. Too, I have seen it often not slotted, as I believe it is the =3D slot in both Gambas and Diapasons that give the hard ege, the slotted =3D Diapason sometimes being known as "Horn Diapason". The Viola, to me, is = =3D a broader-sounding warmer string. The Viola da Gamba is somewhere in =3D between. One of the finest string ranks I ever heard was in California - = =3D a Viola Pomposa. It was big, broad, very warm, and could be used as the = =3D 8ft "Diapason" in the Swell, or with the Celeste to make a very =3D beautiful sound, or just on its own with the box shut to give a most =3D ethereal sound. Absolutely wonderful rank, made about 1985 I think. I think Continental and English Dulcianas are different, too. Over the =3D years I've been listening to those by "English" builders (including NZ =3D and Oz builders) and those imported from Stinkens, Laukhuff and the =3D like. The Continental ones seem to be of smaller scale, a little more =3D stringy, i.e. without the biggish fundamental of the English Dulciana, =3D made of thinner and harder metal (including spotted metal), and =3D sometimes slotted. The Continental ones seem designed to be used, when =3D desired, with other stops, but a good English Dulciana, in my =3D experience, is a soft velvety breath more like an Echo Diapason, made of = =3D plain and thickish metal, only used to be used in combination if you =3D have a warm softish 4ft flute above it. Occasionally, I've found that it = =3D also works well with the Celeste coupled from the Swell with the =3D shutters shut - to give a very warm slow beat. Of course, it has to be =3D of different tone if it's being used as one of 3rks with a diapason and = =3D gedackt to make a tiny 3rk unit organ extended all the way up. Dolce vs Dulciana? The Dolces I've seen have all been German, more of =3D the Continental tone I've mentioned above. Possibly, though I'm not sure = =3D on this, the name has sometimes been used as, if you've got a drawknob, = =3D Dolce Cornet 3rks fits neatly on the knob in three lines, where Dulciana = =3D Cornet 3rks take too much space on the top line. Similarly, I've seen a = =3D wonderful Cornopean spelt "Horn", because it was easier to engrave. And = =3D again, Stopped Diapason can become "Stopt Diap." for the same reason.=3D20 The German influence often changes things. For example, TCLewis would =3D use the term "Geigen Principal" for something not markedly different =3D from the more-English, less-gritty Violin Diapason. Too, he would =3D sometimes make his Great Stopped Diapasons of metal, even as a big Rohr = =3D Flute, whereas English ones are almost always of wood. TCLewis had the =3D more 19thC German sound by a long way - I love it's incredible richness. Finally, Chris B - thank your lucky stars you have an organ at all. In =3D this parish there are three churches, all with electronic things, and =3D I'd have to go many miles to get even a 1-decker tracker of 16 8 8 8. (I = =3D kid you not). I'm sure we all understand the spit jealous pfffffft bit - = =3D I feel this EVERY ISSUE of "The Tracker" or suchlike. :-()-: Stick with me, folks! Regards, Ross=3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00AF_01C1847C.9A158FC0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Dwindows-1252"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4134.600" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV>Dear all,</DIV> <DIV>Sorry, folks, if I've sounded like an aggressive know-all since =3D joining=3D20 this List. The response has been most interesting, with a number of =3D private=3D20 emails coming my way, some to say, "Cool it, or we'll filter you out," =3D and=3D20 others "Keep at it, don't stop."&nbsp; Oh well. :-)</DIV> <DIV>It may be partly because I'm a NZer, and we have very vigorous ways = =3D of=3D20 arguing, that I've used what is seen by two or three as intemperate and = =3D arrogant=3D20 language. Sorry if that's so - and stick with me, I'm not the ogre some = =3D of you=3D20 might think. As for getting on with my organists - believe me, we've =3D always got=3D20 along exceedingly well and I've made sure money is spent on both organ =3D and=3D20 organist. </DIV> <DIV>Please, don't include my good wife Lynda in any of this. (grin) I'm = =3D not=3D20 sure how her name comes at all onto my postings, but Lynda is not an =3D organist at=3D20 all and doesn't want to be. </DIV> <DIV>One or two of you have emailed me as "Father." Please don't. In the = =3D   Anglican Church in NZ, very different from your ECUSA, about 1 in 200 of = =3D the=3D20 Anglican clergy call themselves that, entirely self-given as it has no =3D status=3D20 whatever in our Church. I'm "Ross" to everyone, small kids and wrinklies = =3D alike.=3D20 Forget the Ross-the-retired-Vicar bit - I'm a colleague and (I do really = =3D hope)=3D20 friend here on this List.</DIV> <DIV>I think there is a distinction between the Gamba and the Viola da =3D Gamba in=3D20 tone and construction. In my experience, a Viola da Gamba is of bigger =3D scale,=3D20 lower and wider mouth, and is not as "hard" in tone as a Gamba. Too, I =3D have seen=3D20 it often not slotted, as I believe it is the slot in both Gambas and =3D Diapasons=3D20 that give the hard ege, the slotted Diapason sometimes being known as =3D "Horn=3D20 Diapason".&nbsp;The Viola, to me, is a broader-sounding warmer string. =3D The Viola=3D20 da Gamba is somewhere in between. One of the finest string ranks I ever = =3D heard=3D20 was in California - a&nbsp; Viola Pomposa. It was big, broad, very warm, = =3D and=3D20 could be used as the 8ft "Diapason" in the Swell, or with the Celeste to = =3D make a=3D20 very beautiful sound, or just on its own with the box shut to give a =3D most=3D20 ethereal sound. Absolutely wonderful rank, made about 1985 I =3D think.</DIV> <DIV>I think Continental and English Dulcianas are different, too. Over = =3D the=3D20 years I've been listening to those by "English" builders (including NZ =3D and Oz=3D20 builders) and those imported from Stinkens, Laukhuff and the like. = The=3D20 Continental ones seem to be of smaller scale, a little more stringy, =3D i.e.=3D20 without the biggish fundamental of the English Dulciana, made of thinner = =3D   and&nbsp;harder metal (including spotted metal), and sometimes slotted. = =3D The=3D20 Continental ones seem designed to be used, when desired, with other =3D stops, but a=3D20 good English Dulciana, in my experience, is a soft velvety breath =3D more&nbsp;like=3D20 an Echo Diapason, made of plain and thickish metal, only used to be used = =3D in=3D20 combination if you have a warm softish 4ft flute above it. Occasionally, = =3D I've=3D20 found that it also works well with the Celeste coupled from the Swell =3D with the=3D20 shutters shut - to give a very warm slow beat. Of course, it has to be =3D of=3D20 different tone&nbsp;if it's being used as one of 3rks with a diapason =3D and=3D20 gedackt to make a tiny 3rk unit organ extended all the way up.</DIV> <DIV>Dolce vs Dulciana? The Dolces I've seen have all been German, more = =3D of the=3D20 Continental tone I've mentioned above. Possibly, though I'm not sure on = =3D this,=3D20 the name has sometimes been used as, if you've got a drawknob, Dolce =3D Cornet 3rks=3D20 fits neatly on the knob in three lines, where Dulciana Cornet 3rks take = =3D too much=3D20 space on the top line. Similarly, I've seen a wonderful Cornopean spelt = =3D "Horn",=3D20 because it was easier to engrave. And again, Stopped Diapason can become = =3D "Stopt=3D20 Diap." for the same reason. </DIV> <DIV>The German influence often changes things. For example, TCLewis =3D would use=3D20 the term "Geigen Principal" for something not markedly different from =3D the=3D20 more-English, less-gritty Violin Diapason. Too, he would sometimes make = =3D his=3D20 Great Stopped Diapasons of metal, even as a big Rohr Flute, whereas =3D English ones=3D20 are almost always of wood. TCLewis had the more 19thC German sound by a = =3D long way=3D20 - I love it's incredible richness.</DIV> <DIV>Finally, Chris B - thank your lucky stars you have an organ at all. = =3D In this=3D20 parish there are&nbsp;three churches, all with electronic things, and =3D I'd have=3D20 to&nbsp;go many miles to get even a 1-decker tracker of 16 8 8 8. (I kid = =3D you=3D20 not).&nbsp;I'm sure we all understand the spit jealous pfffffft bit - I = =3D feel=3D20 this EVERY ISSUE of "The Tracker" or suchlike.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; =3D :-()-:</DIV> <DIV>Stick with me, folks!</DIV> <DIV>Regards,</DIV> <DIV>Ross&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00AF_01C1847C.9A158FC0--      
(back) Subject: RE: Cornet -- Stop List included---delete if not interested From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 13:53:21 -0600   Groan.... : - )   -----Original Message----- From: Jeff White [mailto:reedstop@prodigy.net] Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2001 10:45 PM To: PipeChat Subject: RE: Cornet -- Stop List included---delete if not interested     Ross, The organ is a 1986 Zimmer designed by Paul Bunjes (collective groans = ensue)      
(back) Subject: Re: Assuring our future From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 15:01:07 EST   TubaMagna writes:   > We also know that there > has never been a church in which there REALLY was > no room for a pipe organ <<   To which Myostosis responds:   >Approximately 20 x 30, 8' ceilings. Front of church is divided into = three >spaces: small pastor's study, small altar/pulpit area, and even smaller >choir stalls. <<   In an effort to exhibit responsibility, I returned to Sebastian's complete =   post on this subject. He further states:   >Resenting something that is high quality, or the people who advocate high =   >quality, neither elevates the lowly nor alters the differential. Let us = be >responsible adults and acknowledge that the electronic is here to stay, = but >let us not be so quick as to hail it as the answer for the future. <<   Perhaps we are not, Sebastian, but rather saying it is the answer for = "now." Where grants, bequests, and outright donations help to underwrite the purchase of a pipe organ, options are oft times unnecessary. When these benevolence are absent and the church must bear the entire cost initially = in addition to the ordinary expenses which hold priority, options quite often =   have to be considered. Thus, the interim organ which in many cases the digital organ fills. I can cite several examples within my locale where synthetic organs were purchased years ago at a considerable price but = today have given way to a pipe organ of decent specification and quality. That = was the original goal but beyond fiscal realization at the time.   With regard to no church being unable to fit in pipes, I can demonstrate = many which fall into the example Vicki describes. Yes, we could put in a = unison rank, hang it on the wall and call it an organ but is it, really? One of = the great attributes of the organ is its versatility of voices. Lacking this = the organ is monolithic, inflexible and boring. Moreover, churches of this dimension normally do not have the organist with skills to extract from = the limited resources due to lack of training and abilities.   I would question the validity that we are saying digitals are the answer = for the future. They are certainly an immediate improvement over decades-old electronics which were horrid when new and have not improved with age. To denying that improvement when a quality pipe organ is beyond current financial capability borders on the masochistic.   Was it Browning who penned, "Man's reach should exceed his grasp, else = what's a heaven for?" Most aspire for the real thing and the digital is for = many, and in most cases the serious, a mere stepping stone on the rocky road to fulfillment. We should not begrudge that step so that when the pipe organ = is installed, finances will ensure quality in voice, construction, enjoyment = and longevity.   And for this dissertation, there are an equal number in opposition which = is a good thing. Otherwise we would be collectively boring as is the one rank organ.   Best wishes, Jim Pitts      
(back) Subject: Re: Ross' comments about the Cornet From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 17:22:46 EST     --part1_18b.6b1ffd.294a8436_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/13/01 5:50:07 AM Eastern Standard Time, chorale@clara.co.uk writes:     > It's alright for you lot with your forests of pipes sticking up all > over the place ! > Spare a thought for we unfortunates who, confronted with a requirement > for a 'cornet' registration, can only look at a hundred year old Vox > H, a four foot flute, a Dulciana Mixt, and a terminally temperamental > swell Oboe. 'Struth!' >   Oh come on, Chris. Enjoy your beautiful little organ for what it is. Every organ can't have everything. If you have a unique little English small parish or chamber style organ, play appropriate music and enjoy it. = If you want to play French or German, run down the street (or whatever) or =   just count your blessing that you have a nice little organ.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_18b.6b1ffd.294a8436_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/13/01 5:50:07 AM Eastern Standard Time, chorale@clara.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">It's alright for = you lot with your forests of pipes sticking up all <BR>over the place ! <BR>Spare a thought for we unfortunates who, confronted with a requirement <BR>for a 'cornet' registration, can only look at a hundred year old Vox <BR>H, a four foot flute, a Dulciana Mixt, and a terminally temperamental <BR>swell Oboe. 'Struth!' <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Oh come on, Chris. &nbsp;&nbsp;Enjoy your beautiful little organ for = what it is. &nbsp;&nbsp;Every organ can't have everything. &nbsp;&nbsp;If = you have a unique little English small parish or chamber style organ, play = appropriate music and enjoy it. &nbsp;&nbsp;If you want to play French or = German, run down the street (or whatever) or just count your blessing that = you have a nice little organ. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_18b.6b1ffd.294a8436_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Organs of St. Paul's Cathedral, London From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 17:20:29 -0500   In the December issue of The American Organist, Barbara Owen reviews a = brand new book by by Nicholas Plumley and Austin Niland entitled, "A History of the Organs in St. Paul's Cathedral." OHS has just received a shipment of these books and they are available to order on the opening page of the OHS Catalog website, http://www.ohscatalog.org. Alas, the books arrived too late to be included in the 80-page OHS Catalog 2002 that is now arriving = in mailboxes, but the book is available from OHS, nonetheless.   All of the items in the new printed catalog, including 200 new items of sheet music, are now listed as well at http://www.ohscatalog.org   Bill