PipeChat Digest #2569 - Friday, December 14, 2001
 
The Organ Classifieds x-post
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net>
Re: Assuring our future
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Assuring our future
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Beautiful Organ Recording (theatre) from Boston
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: things
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Ross' comments about the Cornet
  by "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk>
Re: Dolce Cornets
  by "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk>
Re: Dolce Cornets
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Dolce Cornets
  by "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk>
Re: Ross' comments about the Cornet
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Dolce Cornets
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Ross' comments about the Cornet
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: imitation
  by <Icedad@aol.com>
Burgie (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Following the Debate
  by "Mandy Glass" <amadpoet@lycos.com>
 

(back) Subject: The Organ Classifieds x-post From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 16:21:18 -0600   Hello and Happy Holidays to all. This message is to introduce to you or remind you of the Organ Classifieds web site. Located at http://www.organclassifieds.com, this = site allows you to post and browse classified ads dealing with organs. = Specific categories include Items For Sale, Looking to Buy, Organists Available, = Job Openings, Organbuilders and Services, Websites, Concerts & Recitals, Questions, or anything else Organ related. The best part is you can post = an ad or read them FOR FREE! That's right, this site is a completely free service, so go visit http://www.organclassifieds.com and sell some organ parts, find what you've been looking for, advertise your business or your website (or your email list!). It's all FREE! Think of it as a really = nice Christmas present! The Organ Classifieds http://www.organclassifieds.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Assuring our future From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 17:28:32 EST     --part1_151.5b60724.294a8590_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/13/01 11:18:03 AM Eastern Standard Time, Myosotis51@aol.com writes:     > Approximately 20 x 30, 8' ceilings. Front of church is divided into = three > spaces: small pastor's study, small altar/pulpit area, and even smaller =   > choir stalls. There is a lovely stained glass window centered over the > altar. Pews are generally full on Sunday morning, so removing some is = not > an > option. Church is so short of money that they're currently settling = for a > Conn Rhapsody, no external speakers. Right now, they're worried about > coming > up with the money to repair the roof. >   My suggestion would be to sing unaccompanied. Perhaps get a small piano, = or better yet, an octave of handbells for pitch. DO WITHOUT AN INSTRUMENT. = Let people know that they are actually without an organ. There is = nothing wrong with unaccompanied singing. When the roof is fixed and they've realized that money can be raised for things that they really need, get started on raising money for a small pipe organ which could sit where the electronic's console is now. A nice portative would be perfect. Be creative!   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_151.5b60724.294a8590_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/13/01 11:18:03 AM Eastern Standard Time, Myosotis51@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Approximately 20 x = 30, 8' ceilings. &nbsp;Front of church is divided into three <BR>spaces: &nbsp;small pastor's study, small altar/pulpit area, and even = smaller <BR>choir stalls. &nbsp;There is a lovely stained glass window centered = over the <BR>altar. &nbsp;Pews are generally full on Sunday morning, so removing = some is not an <BR>option. &nbsp;Church is so short of &nbsp;money that they're currently = settling for a <BR>Conn Rhapsody, no external speakers. &nbsp;Right now, they're worried = about coming <BR>up with the money to repair the roof. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>My suggestion would be to sing unaccompanied. &nbsp;Perhaps get a = small piano, or better yet, an octave of handbells for pitch. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;DO WITHOUT AN INSTRUMENT. &nbsp;&nbsp;Let people know = that they are actually without an organ. &nbsp;&nbsp;There is nothing = wrong with unaccompanied singing. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;When the roof is fixed = and they've realized that money can be raised for things that they really = need, get started on raising money for a small pipe organ which could sit = where the electronic's console is now. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;A nice portative = would be perfect. &nbsp;&nbsp;Be creative! <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_151.5b60724.294a8590_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Assuring our future From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 17:36:26 EST     --part1_da.109bd1cc.294a876a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/13/01 4:04:26 PM Eastern Standard Time, Wurlibird1@aol.com writes:     > With regard to no church being unable to fit in pipes, I can demonstrate =   > many > which fall into the example Vicki describes. Yes, we could put in a = unison > rank, hang it on the wall and call it an organ but is it, really? One = of > the > great attributes of the organ is its versatility of voices. Lacking = this > the > organ is monolithic, inflexible and boring. Moreover, churches of this > dimension normally do not have the organist with skills to extract from = the > limited resources due to lack of training and abilities. > If you put in a unison rank and "hang it on the wall" you are not going to =   get good results, but a small one or two rank portative organ would serve perfectly well, not take up more room than a standard console, can be entirely self contained, and provide a beautiful source of worship leadership. There is nothing monolythic and boring about one beautifully =   voice principal stop. I think there is no greater beauty in music. In addition, a beautiful organ like this would be much less intimidating and appropriate for the room and the parish.     Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_da.109bd1cc.294a876a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/13/01 4:04:26 PM Eastern Standard Time, Wurlibird1@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">With regard to no = church being unable to fit in pipes, I can demonstrate many <BR>which fall into the example Vicki describes. &nbsp;Yes, we could put = in a unison <BR>rank, hang it on the wall and call it an organ but is it, really? = &nbsp;One of the <BR>great attributes of the organ is its versatility of voices. = &nbsp;Lacking this the <BR>organ is monolithic, inflexible and boring. &nbsp;Moreover, churches = of this <BR>dimension normally do not have the organist with skills to extract = from the <BR>limited resources due to lack of training and abilities. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">If you put in a unison rank and "hang it on the = wall" you are not going to get good results, but a small one or two rank = portative organ would serve perfectly well, not take up more room than a = standard console, can be entirely self contained, and provide a beautiful = source of worship leadership. &nbsp;&nbsp;There is nothing monolythic and = boring about one beautifully voice principal stop. &nbsp;&nbsp;I think = there is no greater beauty in music. &nbsp;&nbsp;In addition, a beautiful = organ like this would be much less intimidating and appropriate for the = room and the parish. <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_da.109bd1cc.294a876a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Beautiful Organ Recording (theatre) from Boston From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 17:42:50 -0500   First of all, buy the the John Cook CD http://store.yahoo.com/ohscatalog/injohcookatw.html   The endangered theatre organ species is alive and well and living in the austere Knight Auditorium at Babson College in Wellesley, Massachusetts.   It is a wonderful performance!   Thank you, John.   Keep up the good work.     Stan Lowkis    
(back) Subject: Re: things From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 17:42:27 -0500   Please don't send documents as attachments. In so many cases, as with the Wards' document, some of us cannot open these documents. If you really = wish use to read your document, send it as a regular-text document. Thanx.   > From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 08:52:03 +1300 > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: things > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Ross' comments about the Cornet From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 22:50:36 -0000   Lord Cornely of the Beagles writes -   > Oh come on, Chris. Enjoy your beautiful little organ for what it is. > Every organ can't have everything. If you have a unique little English > small parish or chamber style organ, play appropriate music and enjoy it. > If you want to play French or German, run down the street (or whatever) or > just count your blessing that you have a nice little organ. > > Bruce   Well of course! Got to have me bit o' fun though, innit? ........And I *do* like a bit of French chamber music now and agin ........and Spanish......... and Italian........ <g> Chris B    
(back) Subject: Re: Dolce Cornets From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 23:09:00 -0000   From Bud Subject: Dolce Cornets     > I defer to the organ-builders on this one (grin). I think it depends on > the builder. I've encountered at least one Hook & Hastings (1900) in which > the Swell "Dolce" Cornet was right on the edge of being big enough to > serve as a normal French Cornet de Recit. OTOH, I've encountered some E.M. > Skinners (and others) where it was just big enough to add some "bite" to > the massed strings. > > I don't recall encountering the Dolce STOP as anything other than a > Dulciana, basically, so I'd be interested in hearing what Schulze did with > it ... don't recall reading anything about that, but Senior Moments abound > (grin).   Hi Bud, My note was addressing the fact that the Dolce and the Dulciana are quite different pipes, with the Dulciana being a straight forward, narrow scale diapason, whilst the Dolce is a reverse taper pipe, and fully described as a flute. The reverse taper gives a degree of bite to the tone, but it nevertheless is highly valued where it occurs. Binns of Leeds, England, was particularly taken with it and included it in many of his instruments. Its disadvantage was that because of its form, it took up a lot more space on the sound board than most builders were prepared to allow it, and thus it normally had to give way to the Dulciana. A lot of confusion is caused by nomenclatures including the Italian descriptive word 'dolce', where they are referring to 'sweetness' of tone, rather than to the presence of the German named Dolce pipe.   regards Chris B    
(back) Subject: Re: Dolce Cornets From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 13:06:30 +1300   I thought that "Dolcan" or "Dolkan" was the name for a reverse-tapered = rank. And that a Dolce was an ordinary cylindrical rank. A flutey outward = tapering rank is called "Portunal" in the Metzler in the Grossmunster in Zurich. Fabulous - listen to the old lp's of Lionel Rogg's Bach there. Ross -----Original Message----- From: Chris Baker <chorale@clara.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, December 14, 2001 12:10 PM Subject: Re: Dolce Cornets     >From Bud >Subject: Dolce Cornets > > >> I defer to the organ-builders on this one (grin). I think it depends >on >> the builder. I've encountered at least one Hook & Hastings (1900) in >which >> the Swell "Dolce" Cornet was right on the edge of being big enough >to >> serve as a normal French Cornet de Recit. OTOH, I've encountered >some E.M. >> Skinners (and others) where it was just big enough to add some >"bite" to >> the massed strings. >> >> I don't recall encountering the Dolce STOP as anything other than a >> Dulciana, basically, so I'd be interested in hearing what Schulze >did with >> it ... don't recall reading anything about that, but Senior Moments >abound >> (grin). > >Hi Bud, >My note was addressing the fact that the Dolce and the Dulciana are >quite different pipes, with the Dulciana being a straight forward, >narrow scale diapason, whilst the Dolce is a reverse taper pipe, and >fully described as a flute. The reverse taper gives a degree of bite >to the tone, but it nevertheless is highly valued where it occurs. >Binns of Leeds, England, was particularly taken with it and included >it in many of his instruments. >Its disadvantage was that because of its form, it took up a lot more >space on the sound board than most builders were prepared to allow it, >and thus it normally had to give way to the Dulciana. >A lot of confusion is caused by nomenclatures including the Italian >descriptive word 'dolce', where they are referring to 'sweetness' of >tone, rather than to the presence of the German named Dolce pipe. > >regards >Chris B > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Dolce Cornets From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 00:15:51 -0000     > I thought that "Dolcan" or "Dolkan" was the name for a reverse-tapered rank. > And that a Dolce was an ordinary cylindrical rank. A flutey outward tapering > rank is called "Portunal" in the Metzler in the Grossmunster in Zurich. > Fabulous - listen to the old lp's of Lionel Rogg's Bach there. > Ross   Hi Ross, Wossinaname eh?<g> According to Bonavia Hunt, " the Dolce (also called Dolcan and Flauto Dolce), is a soft metal flute of German origin, and of inverted conical form".   There is within English organ building history, a real distinction between these two stops, though as the Dolce came to be rarer by the beginning of the 20th Century, it seems reasonable that its use as the Great division's accompaniment register, would over time cause it to be terminologically associated as the more normally found Dulciana. The three examples I know of the Dolce are of truly beautiful, and more importantly, characterful tone. Whilst most of the Ducianas I know are fairly unremarkable.   Purely as an unnassociated matter of interest, J J Binns, in his two decker work would frequently put his Gedeckt on the great, and put his Hohlflote or Rohrflute in the swell. The Great secondary chorus never seemed to suffer from this, and indeed, by effectively shifting the secondary foundation from the typical hohlflote, to the 4' principal, a completely new emphasis was given to what in many smaller organs is a deficient second flue chorus.   Best etc.. Chris B      
(back) Subject: Re: Ross' comments about the Cornet From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 19:47:18 -0600   ---- Original Message ----- From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2001 4:46 AM Subject: Re: Ross' comments about the Cornet     > From John Speller - > > --------------------- > > Traditionally, the Cornet was mounted on a separate windchest so > that it had > > a common wind source and the five ranks would cohere more > efficiently > > [sigh] > > It's alright for you lot with your forests of pipes sticking up all > over the place ! > Spare a thought for we unfortunates who, confronted with a requirement > for a 'cornet' registration, can only look at a hundred year old Vox > H, a four foot flute, a Dulciana Mixt, and a terminally temperamental > swell Oboe. 'Struth!   I was faced with a similar situation with the little tracker organ I grew = up on. The thing to do is to try everything and see what approximates = nearest to a Cornet. In the case of the organ in our village church at home, the best solution was Swell Stopped Diapason 8' and Piccolo 2', coupled to = Great Wald Flute 4' and Twelfth 2.2/3', using the Great for the Cornet solo and the Swell for the accompaniment. That wasn't nearly as difficult as = finding what sounded like a Tierce en Taille. On the same instrument this was = Great Open Diapason 8' + Dulciana 8', accompanied on the Swell Lieblich Bourdon 16' and Stopped Diapason 8', played an octave higher. You would have been amazed how authentic these registrations sounded. On our present organ, a little 9 rank Aeolian-Skinner, for the Cornet I use Swell Prestant 4' + Plein Jeu III with the Swell 16' coupler. For the Tierce en Taille I use the same registration without the suboctave coupler, but played an octave lower. It very much depends on the instrument concerned what works best, which is why I recommend trying everything and listening to what sounds best.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Dolce Cornets From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 20:01:18 -0600   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2001 5:09 PM Subject: Re: Dolce Cornets     > My note was addressing the fact that the Dolce and the Dulciana are > quite different pipes, with the Dulciana being a straight forward, > narrow scale diapason, whilst the Dolce is a reverse taper pipe, and > fully described as a flute. The reverse taper gives a degree of bite > to the tone, but it nevertheless is highly valued where it occurs.   In my experience as an organbuilder, stops described as Dolces sometimes have a reverse taper as you describe and sometimes are practically indistinguishable from a Dulciana. Though strictly speaking a Dolce probably should be a reverse taper stop, like a Dolcan, I think some = people, particularly in the United States, were a little lax about the = terminology. Dolce Cornets are indeed generally made of of Dulciana pipes; they are = thus a type of Dulciana Mixture, though the latter might often be 17-19-22, whereas a Dolce Cornet is usually 12-15-17 (although I have come across examples on both Hook & Hastings and Kimball organs where they were just = two ranks -- 12-15). I have also come across slightly louder 12-15-17 = mixtures, particularly on early Casavant organs, that are described as "Solo Cornet" to distinguish them from Dolce Cornets. Another interesting example of reverse taper stops are the Gross Gamba and Gamba Celeste stops sometimes found on Skinner Solo divisions in the USA.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Ross' comments about the Cornet From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 21:20:15 EST     --part1_29.1f6f1430.294abbdf_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/13/01 7:10:02 PM Eastern Standard Time, chorale@clara.co.uk writes:     > Well of course! Got to have me bit o' fun though, innit? > .......And I *do* like a bit of French chamber music now and agin > .......and Spanish......... and Italian........ >   Think how much fun it would be if there were SEVERAL small uniquely nationally styled instruments in an area. What fun to hear period music = on period instruments.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_29.1f6f1430.294abbdf_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/13/01 7:10:02 PM Eastern Standard Time, chorale@clara.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Well of course! = Got to have me bit o' fun though, innit? <BR>.......And I *do* like a bit of French chamber music now and agin <BR>.......and Spanish......... and Italian........ <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Think how much fun it would be if there were SEVERAL small uniquely = nationally styled instruments in an area. &nbsp;What fun to hear period = music on period instruments. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_29.1f6f1430.294abbdf_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: imitation From: <Icedad@aol.com> Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 00:44:25 EST     --part1_ce.1e64a87f.294aebb9_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dr. K,   Thank you for the plug for digital organs.We recently signed a = contract with Dunne Music, Orlando for a 3 manual 80 stop Renaissance with 7 rank = of real wind blown pipework. The Pipe ranks are: Principal 8', Octave 4', Fifteenth 2', Flute Harmonique 8', Bourdon 8', Spitzfloete 4', and = Trumpeta Real 8'. We are replacing an aging and horrific sounding Ahlborn 3 manual custom and the sooner the better. After 1 year of research and visiting churches where we played and listened to all size organs, the organ committee decided to go with the "wonderful" sound of the Allen pipe/digital. We had proposals for pipe/digital combinations from Wicks, Rodgers/Ruffatti, Reuter and Allen. We all were ecstatic over the "fabulous" sound of the Renaissance = and the ability to change to French, English, Northern German. Our organ will have French stops from an exquisite Casavant in London, Ontario. I have selected the stops and the ranks of pipes for the installation.I = will If you wish. I will keep in contact with you concerning our nearing installation.   Sincerely,   Daniel   --part1_ce.1e64a87f.294aebb9_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3>Dr. K,<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Thank you for the plug for digital organs.We = recently signed a contract with Dunne Music, Orlando for&nbsp; a 3 manual = 80 stop Renaissance with 7 rank of real wind blown pipework. The Pipe = ranks are: Principal 8', Octave 4', Fifteenth 2', Flute Harmonique 8', = Bourdon 8', Spitzfloete 4', and Trumpeta Real 8'. We are replacing an = aging and horrific sounding Ahlborn 3 manual custom and the sooner the = better.<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; After 1 year of research and visiting = churches where we played and listened to all size organs, the organ = committee decided to go with the "wonderful" sound of the Allen = pipe/digital. We had proposals for pipe/digital combinations from Wicks, = Rodgers/Ruffatti, Reuter and Allen.<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; We all were ecstatic over&nbsp; the = "fabulous" sound of the Renaissance and the ability to change to French, = English, Northern German. Our organ will have French stops from an = exquisite Casavant in London, Ontario.<BR> I have selected the stops and the ranks of pipes for the installation.I = will If you wish. I will keep in contact with you concerning our nearing = installation.<BR> <BR> Sincerely,<BR> <BR> Daniel <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </FONT></HTML>   --part1_ce.1e64a87f.294aebb9_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Burgie (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 21:51:31 -0800   Burgie's home from the hospital. It WASN'T pneumocystis, but just plain old garden-variety pneumonia. He's fine ... he should be able to go to his folks for Christmas next week. Thank you all for your prayers!   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Following the Debate From: "Mandy Glass" <amadpoet@lycos.com> Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 23:59:03 -0600   Hmm...   Now, I really don't want to egg on this electronic/acoustic debate, = especially since the list owners ask us in the list guidelines not to get = into it in the first place. All the same, I feel I have to get my two = cents into the piggybank, and then I'll never say another word about it.   The fact that electronic organs are out there doesn't bother me in the = least bit because I would be happy to have the most horrific, burned out, = half of it doesn't work electric organ on earth. As it is, there is one = organ at my disposal, it is an Allen, and the Great sounds like a paper = shredder. But I can only use it for three hours a week, and if I could = TELL you how happy I feel when I get in two extra MINUTES a week on that = instrument, then I wouldn't have to write this email.   Personally, I=92m more worried about the fact that none of my fellow music = students (except the one other organist, of course) can recognize organ = music when they see it. Organ music isn=92t even mentioned in Music = Appreciation classes here. When you mention Vierne, or Widor, or Dupre, = eyes glaze over. Maybe people- i.e., church goers, patrons- would be = willing to pay for better quality organs if they knew the instrument = EXISTED?   Oh well. Mandy