PipeChat Digest #2573 - Sunday, December 16, 2001
 
Re: tiny pipe organs
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: tiny pipe organs
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: tiny pipe organs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
tiny organs in tiny swell boxes
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: tiny pipe organs
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: tiny pipe organs
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
The Greatest Show On Earth!! 2 More Chances
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: tiny pipe organs
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: Assuring our future
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: tiny pipe organs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #2572 - 12/15/01
  by "Ken Earl" <ken_earl01@hotmail.com>
Re: tiny pipe organs
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: PipeChat Digest #2572 - 12/15/01
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: PipeChat Digest #2572 - 12/15/01
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Re: tiny pipe organs From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 07:22:44 -0800   Well Bud, the one in question has no string, no reed (you did mention those in commection with the small organ you cited,)no divided stops, common bass for the diapason and gedacht(sic) and no pedal stops. If it was enclosed it would be more useful for the Anglican services but it is not. It is purely and simply a small hymn machine and even then too small for the church. Give me a good electronic rather than that. I didn't expect that I would get much support, but I am the one in question here and I know which I prefer. Bob Elms.   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > Bob, I have to disagree with you on that score ... I have played some > EXQUISITE small pipe organs that NEVER tired the ear. > >  
(back) Subject: Re: tiny pipe organs From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 12:08:48 EST     --part1_137.62f36f2.294cdda0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/15/01 10:26:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, elmsr@albanyis.com.au writes:     > If it was enclosed it would be more useful for the Anglican services but = it > is > not.   Balderdasch, poopoo, rubbish, etc. Anglican worship does not require shutters!!   Nothing is more sickening than listening to someone noodle with the box = shut all the way through communion or ride the swell pedal (to be artistic) = during hymns. The FIRST think you need in an Anglican instrument IS a "hymn machine." If you want to be able to play literature go down the street = to St. Judas by the Bank!     Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ and wander through the Mall Without Walls   --part1_137.62f36f2.294cdda0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/15/01 10:26:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, elmsr@albanyis.com.au writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">If it was enclosed = it would be more useful for the Anglican services but it is <BR>not.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Balderdasch, poopoo, rubbish, etc. &nbsp;&nbsp;Anglican worship does = not require shutters!! <BR> <BR>Nothing is more sickening than listening to someone noodle with the = box shut all the way through communion or ride the swell pedal (to be = artistic) during hymns. &nbsp;The FIRST think you need in an Anglican = instrument IS a "hymn machine." &nbsp;&nbsp;If you want to be able to play = literature go down the street to St. Judas by the Bank! <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;and wander through the Mall Without Walls</FONT></HTML>   --part1_137.62f36f2.294cdda0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: tiny pipe organs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 11:19:08 -0600     --------------3EEF5CEAA2FCC79F6DB3A6AA Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > In a message dated 12/15/01 10:26:01 AM Eastern > Standard Time, elmsr@albanyis.com.au writes: > > > >> If it was enclosed it would be more useful for >> the Anglican services but it is >> not. > > Balderdasch, poopoo, rubbish, etc. Anglican > worship does not require shutters!! > > Nothing is more sickening than listening to > someone noodle with the box shut all the way > through communion or ride the swell pedal (to be > artistic) during hymns. The FIRST think you > need in an Anglican instrument IS a "hymn > machine." If you want to be able to play > literature go down the street to St. Judas by > the Bank!   Much though I am a supporter of small organs, I have to disagree with you over the swellbox, Bruce. Unless a church is purely going to use their organ for hymns, there is need for a swellbox in many anthems and much service music. Furthermore, especially in a very small organ, a swellbox is useful for adjusting the volume of the individual stops within it. For a small church I would advocate something along the lines of the nave organ in St. Paul's Cathedral, London, built by Willis in 1881. This instrument fills the whole cathedral and has often been mistaken when playing, even by organists, for the five manual main organ.   Great   8' Open Diapason 8' Lieblich Gedact 4' Principal 2' Fifteenth Mixture III (added by Mander)   Swell   8' Open Diapason 4' Gemshorn 8' Cornopean   Pedal   16' Bourdon   But it does have a swellbox!   John Speller   --------------3EEF5CEAA2FCC79F6DB3A6AA Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML> Cremona502@cs.com wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE><FONT FACE=3D"arial,helvetica"><FONT SIZE=3D-1>In = a message dated 12/15/01 10:26:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, elmsr@albanyis.com.au writes:</FONT></FONT> <BR>&nbsp; <BR>&nbsp; <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><FONT = FACE=3D"arial,helvetica"><FONT SIZE=3D-1>If it was enclosed it would be more useful for the Anglican services but it is</FONT></FONT> <BR><FONT FACE=3D"arial,helvetica"><FONT = SIZE=3D-1>not.</FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE>   <P><FONT FACE=3D"Arial"><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000"><FONT = SIZE=3D-1>Balderdasch, poopoo, rubbish, etc.&nbsp;&nbsp; Anglican worship does not require = shutters!!</FONT></FONT></FONT> <P><FONT FACE=3D"Arial"><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000"><FONT SIZE=3D-1>Nothing is = more sickening than listening to someone noodle with the box shut all the way through communion or ride the swell pedal (to be artistic) during = hymns.&nbsp; The FIRST think you need in an Anglican instrument IS a "hymn = machine."&nbsp;&nbsp; If you want to be able to play literature go down the street to St. Judas by the Bank!</FONT></FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE> Much though I am a supporter of small organs, I have to disagree with you over the swellbox, Bruce.&nbsp; Unless a church is purely going to use their organ for hymns, there is need for a swellbox in many anthems and much service music.&nbsp; Furthermore, especially in a very small organ, a swellbox is useful for adjusting the volume of the individual stops = within it.&nbsp; For a small church I would advocate something along the lines of the nave organ in St. Paul's Cathedral, London, built by Willis in = 1881.&nbsp; This instrument fills the whole cathedral and has often been mistaken when playing, even by organists, for the five manual main organ. <P>Great <P>8' Open Diapason <BR>8' Lieblich Gedact <BR>4' Principal <BR>2' Fifteenth <BR>Mixture III (added by Mander) <P>Swell <P>8' Open Diapason <BR>4' Gemshorn <BR>8' Cornopean <P>Pedal <P>16' Bourdon <P>But it does have a swellbox! <P>John Speller</HTML>   --------------3EEF5CEAA2FCC79F6DB3A6AA--    
(back) Subject: tiny organs in tiny swell boxes From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 09:45:58 -0800   Being able to open and close the box with a reed or reeds drawn WITH an UNENCLOSED 8' Open Diapason is one of the most characteristic sounds of a romantic organ, both English and French.   You gotta have some species of "Full Swell to Reeds" to play a LOT of Anglican anthems and Services.   I would do something like this:   MANUAL - stops divided at middle c   (unenclosed)   8' Open Diapason - 1-12 stopped or Haskell - in facade from tenor C 4' Octave 2' Fifteenth   (enclosed)   8' Flute - stopped or chimney 8' String or Gemshorn - 1-12 Quintadena pipes or stopped flute [8' Celeste] [4' Flute] 8' Reed - 1-12 mitered or half-length - Oboe or small Trumpet   PEDAL - unenclosed   16' Bourdon       Or, if you prefer, have ONLY the 8' Open Diapason unenclosed, and the rest in the box. I've played little organs like this where the 4' Octave and/or the 4' Flute played down an octave with the box CLOSED was a LOVELY sound for accompaniments.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: tiny pipe organs From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 13:18:37 -0500   Hilbourne Roosevelt built a two-stop tracker that now stands in Miller Memorial United Methodist Church, Bethel VT: a principal and a salicional rank. The church is of equivalent size: four pews from front to back = in the center of the nave.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Re: tiny pipe organs From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 13:27:02 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3091267622_30925335_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit     Much though I am a supporter of small organs, I have to disagree with you over the swellbox, Bruce. Unless a church is purely going to use their organ for hymns, there is need for a swellbox in many anthems and much service music. Furthermore, especially in a very small organ, a swellbox = is useful for adjusting the volume of the individual stops within it.   I could not agree more with Dr. Speller. If you wish to hear a small = organ -- single manual w. ca. 10 stops plus 16' Bourdon in the Pedal - with swell box as a valuable tool, hear my CD (Raven OAR-290) "As the Dew = From Heaven Distilling" at Orwell Vt. That 1865 Hook just "comes alive" even more because of the ability to shade the tone this way and that as the = music seems to suggest. That it is not a "balanced" swell pedal makes it a = bit of a challenge, but it can be done.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA     --MS_Mac_OE_3091267622_30925335_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: tiny pipe organs</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <BLOCKQUOTE><BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </BLOCKQUOTE>Much though I am a supporter of small organs, I have to = disagr=3D ee with you over the swellbox, Bruce. &nbsp;Unless a church is purely = going =3D to use their organ for hymns, there is need for a swellbox in many anthems = a=3D nd much service music. &nbsp;Furthermore, especially in a very small = organ, =3D a swellbox is useful for adjusting the volume of the individual stops = within=3D it.<BR> <FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><BR> I could not agree more with Dr. Speller. &nbsp;&nbsp;If you wish to hear a = =3D small organ -- &nbsp;single manual w. ca. 10 stops plus 16' Bourdon in the = P=3D edal &nbsp;- &nbsp;with swell box as a valuable tool, hear my CD = &nbsp;(Rave=3D n OAR-290) &nbsp;&quot;As the Dew From Heaven Distilling&quot; at Orwell = Vt.=3D &nbsp;That 1865 Hook just &quot;comes alive&quot; even more because of = the =3D ability to shade the tone this way and that as the music seems to suggest. = &=3D nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;That it is not a &quot;balanced&quot; swell pedal makes = it =3D a bit of a challenge, but it can be done. <BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Karl E. Moyer<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Lancaster = PA</FONT></BLOCKQUOTE> </BODY> </HTML>     --MS_Mac_OE_3091267622_30925335_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: The Greatest Show On Earth!! 2 More Chances From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 14:26:20 -0500   Dear Lists and Friends,   Sorry about the hyperbolic P.T. Barnum subject heading, but it is very = like how I felt during and after the concert I attended at St. Ignatius Loyola = in Manhattan last night. "2 More Chances" is a bit unfair, as it really can only apply to those on these lists within reach of New York City, but I = hope those people will consider accepting the challenge. By the time you read this, there really will only be 1 more chance - tomorrow, Sunday, at 4 = p.m. In any case, I am keen to report on this rather amazing event, and in accordance with list guidelines, will refrain from detailed discussion of the choral performances.   Some years ago, Kent Tritle at St. Ignatius began presenting a popular Christmas concert, kind of a quodlibet of bits and pieces, somewhat = loosely organized, beautifully peformed, with lots of good cheer and opportunities for everyone to sing the great carols together. I was at the first one of these, and managed to pry myself into a small space somewhere in the nave, so packed was it. In subsequent years, the show was presented twice, and then finally, in recent years, was offered three times. Last night's performance, the first of three, was very full indeed, with just a few = seats here and there in the side aisles. The musical forces: Organists Nancianne Parrella and Andrew Henderson, conductors Kent Tritle and Aaron Smith, = Roger Gillen, Associate Musician (of whom more later), and soloists Kathy Theil, soprano, Melissa Kelley, soprano, Karen Krueger, mezzo soprano, James = Archie Worley, tenor, and Steven Humes, bass. The St. Ignatius (professional) = Choir (14 strong), the Parish Community Choir (70 strong), and an 18 member orchestra of the very best players on the face of the earth.   The program - Christmas Through the Ages: 1. Christe redemptor omnium - anonymous sixth century - Kathy Theil, = soprano 2. Alleluia: Nativitas - Leonin (c. 1135-1201), the stuff we studied in college through dusty old recordings, here brought to robust life by a = choir of men singing from the Baptistry in the northwest corner of the building. 3. Angelus ad Virginem - 13th century anonymous polyphony sung = diaphanously (ah, le mot juste!) by women at the east end. 4. Personet Hodie - a splendid arrangement of John Rutter, during which = the women sang from the east and those men from the northwest joined in as = they walked down the aisle.   Entering the Renaissance: 5. Es ist ein Ros' as arranged by Michael Praetorius 6. We all got to sing Good Christian Friends, Rejoice, with organ and orchestra, and my neighbor in the pew steadfastly and with extra emphasis singing Good Christian MEN rejoice. 7. Hodie Christus Natus est - Sweelinck 8. O magnum mysterium - Victoria 9. A Virgin Most Pure - English traditional   Time for the Baroque: 10. We all sang What Child is This - not quite Baroque! 11. Parts 1 and 2 of the Bach Christmas Oratorio. Just writing these words brings me a thrill of remembrance of this performance. I wanted to sing along, I wanted to dance! Wow! Conducted by Aaron Smith. 12. Organ: Wachet Auf - Bach, wonderfully played by Andrew Henderson.   Romantic and Contemporary: 13 and 14. We got to sing Hark! the Herald Angels Sing, with the Willcocks arrangement we all know and love - and don't often get to do with organ = and full orchestra. And, also Silent Night, with Roger Gillen, Guitar. 15. Fantasia on Greensleeves - Vaughan Williams, conducted by Kent Tritle 16. Gesu Bambino - Pietro Yon, given the full treatment, with Harp blazing away and all the rest, in what I think Kent said was an arrangement by Michael Conley. 17. Ave Maria - Franz Biebl (1906-2001), a stunning piece I have heard the choir sing before. 18. For This Child, composed and performed by Roger Gillen, Irish/American Singer and Guitarist who conducts the Folk Mass Group at St. Ignatius. = Each new strophe appeared with added richness, until by the end, with chorus, orchestra, and other soloists, it was deliciously over the top, the arrangement courtesy of Kent Tritle. 19. Torches, John Joubert, a carol everyone loves to love, done up with = full orchestra and all singers. 20 and 21. We sang Angels we have heard on high, and Joy to the World, in = a big arrangement by John Rutter.   One addition to the program this year - at least, I don't think it was = done last year, was a really beautiful lighting design that unobtrusively = changed with the various pieces, so that, while I was not conscious of it = happening, there was the sudden realization at various points in the program that = parts of this beautiful church were bathed in really magical colors. A credit in the program lists Evan Kovacs as lighting designer. Last year's program, a sort of Christmas Around the World concert, was paced in an amazing way - = it was pleasantly relentless - one thing followed another without break, and that pace was a really positive factor in keeping the audience right on = the edge of their seats. This was true again this year. There was no break and no applause throughout, but let me tell you, it really got let out at the end, long and loud, all pent up as it was, including that wonderful = thunder effect of people stomping on the wood floor in this very resonant space.   I had some moments of doubt about making this performance. I was very = tired from haggling with building trades people over work in our old house, had already put in a lot of miles during the day, and it was pouring with rain and windy. However, listmember DudelK had come up all the way from Washington for this performance and had a ticket waiting for me - what greater inducement than a good visit with him and a free ticket. AND, I = knew what I would be missing if I did not come. Then I missed my train at Brewster North by about two minutes, and faced a traffic-filled, rain = soaked 70 mile drive to Manhattan without a huge amount of time to spare. With three minutes to go, I arrived on the street next to the church just as a man pulled out of a space, giving me my first Christmas Miracle on 84th Street.   If your portfolio will allow you to live on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, you can still make the 3 p.m. performance today. If you are reasonably close, but not that close, I would urge you to try to take in = the Sunday performance at 4 p.m. You'll be glad you did.   Advent Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler      
(back) Subject: Re: tiny pipe organs From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 14:23:21 -0600   On 12/15/01 11:08 AM, Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > The FIRST think you need in an Anglican instrument IS a "hymn > machine." If you want to be able to play literature go down the street = to > St. Judas by the Bank!   Sorry Bruce. Hymns as a first consideration is a Lutheran tradition. The Anglican tradition is not hymns but rather first, liturgy and second, = choral performance. Hymns come a poor third. So if an organ cannot successfully handle liturgy and the choral literature, it is a failure for the Anglican tradition. Of course, if you can genuinely cope with our choral flights of fancy, hymns are no problem.   Cheers, Russ Greene    
(back) Subject: Re: Assuring our future From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 15:24:08 -0600   On 12/13/01 4:36 PM, Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > a small one or two rank portative organ would serve > perfectly well, not take up more room than a standard console, can be > entirely self contained, and provide a beautiful source of worship > leadership. There is nothing monolythic and boring about one = beautifully > voice principal stop. I think there is no greater beauty in music. = In > addition, a beautiful organ like this would be much less intimidating = and > appropriate for the room and the parish.   I have been a pipe organ lover for most of my life. But I've got to tell you, after more than forty years as an organist and choir master, I'd = rather accompany services on a ghetto blaster than cripple along with even the most beautifully voiced "one or two rank portative". No wonder churches = are in many cases turning away from real pipe organs if this type of = instrument is being presented as a serious option for them.   Russ Greene    
(back) Subject: Re: tiny pipe organs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 16:39:39 -0600   That's about the same size as the Episcopal Church in Bonne Terre, = Missouri, in our diocese, which seats I believe around 23, but is a splendid little miniature gothic stone church with a fine tower and everything. It, = however, has always had a reed organ rather than a pipe organ for accompanying the services.   E. & G. G. Hook & Hastings made some little two stop pipe organs, similar = to the Roosevelt you describe, comprising Open Diapason 8' + Dulciana 8'. = The idea was that you accompanied the hymns on the Open Diapason and used the Dulciana for improvising during communion.   John Speller St. Louis, Missouri   Karl Moyer wrote:   > Hilbourne Roosevelt built a two-stop tracker that now stands in Miller > Memorial United Methodist Church, Bethel VT: a principal and a = salicional > rank. The church is of equivalent size: four pews from front to back = in > the center of the nave.    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2572 - 12/15/01 From: "Ken Earl" <ken_earl01@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 23:18:29 -0000   Once again Bruce hits the nail firmly on the head........ <g>   In the UK, the House of Willis used to build tiny 'Junior Development' organs for the then expanding Churches here.   These instruments started at 1 manual 3 ranks (Gedackt 8, Spindle Flute 4, Gemshorn or Principal 2) and were voiced on around 2 - 3" wp, winded = direct from the tiny blower output with no regulator other than the spring loaded chest sides.   In the dead acoustics of these small modern buildings, they were = incredibly effective, and even his 1 manual and pedal, where the gedackt was extended down to 16' and used at independent 16, 8, 4, 2, pitches on the pedal, = were usable for 'leading church services'.   Is this not what a church organ is primarily for, not in fact, to 'perform all the organ literature'. I always thought a church organ was there to lead the praise. How I've been mistaken all my life.   Ken  
(back) Subject: Re: tiny pipe organs From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 15:45:27 -0800   That small organ is a different kettle of fish altogether. I could live with it. For a start it has two manuals and a pedal organ, and it also has a mixture and a reed. The one I mentioned has none of those. Bruce, I like a change of sound for different verses in a hymn. Do I play one verse accompanying on the 15th? The choir has a child soloist. Do I accompany her on the Dulciana all the time, or drown her with the Open diapason? A swell box is most desirable. By the way John Speller's small organ in St Paul's is bigger than the average run of pipe organs we have in this state. You organists in the US are spoilt by the range and size of instruments you play. Most of our instruments have two manuals, some have one, only five have three manuals (discounting theatre organs (2)) and one has four manuals. There is one 32' reed in the whole of this state which covers one million square miles (how big is Texas???). Incidentally one local builder built several tiny one manual organs based on an 8' flute with the other stops upper work and mixtures. Noone wants to play them for church services now. Bob Elms.   > Much though I am a supporter of small organs, I have to disagree with = you over the swellbox, Bruce.   snip For a small church I would advocate something along the lines of the nave organ in St. Paul's Cathedral, London, built by Willis in 1881. This > instrument fills the whole cathedral and has often been mistaken when = playing, even by organists, for the five manual main organ. snip > But it does have a swellbox! > John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2572 - 12/15/01 From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sat, 15 Dec 2001 16:07:57 -0800   Ken, I was not talking about giving organ recitals, I was talking of effective accompaniment of an Anglican service (or a Methodist service - my background) and the small unenclosed organ of a few stops and no pedal organ does not do the job as well as a very good electronic organ. Some of you guys have a problem with your own personal prejudice and will never admit that a modern electronic organ is acceptable. Well I have news for you, you are wrong!!   I have said before several times that I am not putting in a plug for electronic organs, I prefer pipe organs any day, but here is a case where the electronic organ is far more effective. Admit it or not, that is so.It is easy for organists with something of the order of 4/58 pipe organs to pontificate on what the rest of us should play but if you had to come down to 5 ranks yourselves with no pedal organ and no enclosure you might find it a little more frustrating than you will admit.   As for the gentleman who doesn't think church organs are for the organ literature, what is wrong with my wanting to play a Bach P and F as a postlude? How do I do it without a pedal organ? OK the Johannus does a mighty job with such a postlude. Unfortunately the Catholics can't sing, so as hymn accompaniment it is largely a solo instrument but that's another story. Bob Elms.  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2572 - 12/15/01 From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sun, 16 Dec 2001 21:12:24 +1300   Dear all, I was organist for three years at an Anglican Church where there were liturgical services and an active choir. The organ was a 1-manual Pels tracker of 2rks, transmission making it 4 stops, divided treble and bass. Unenclosed, but I could put the lid down, the whole organ being two thirds the size of an upright piano. 8 Gedackt 4 Rohr Flute (extn) 2 Principal 1 Octave (extn) It worked very well indeed for the 60 to 70 at services, yet the whole = thing sat on the floor at the back. It was on 2" w.g. pressure and did not = shriek at all, but was marvellously full and rich for such a wee organ. I loved = it. An electronic instrument would have sounded frightful in such a small = space, right out of keeping. In this wee organ, every pipe was a charming musical instrument. Regards, Ross -----Original Message----- From: Bob Elms <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, December 16, 2001 1:11 PM Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2572 - 12/15/01     >Ken, I was not talking about giving organ recitals, I was talking of >effective accompaniment of an Anglican service (or a Methodist service - >my background) and the small unenclosed organ of a few stops and no >pedal organ does not do the job as well as a very good electronic organ. >Some of you guys have a problem with your own personal prejudice and >will never admit that a modern electronic organ is acceptable. Well I >have news for you, you are wrong!! > >I have said before several times that I am not putting in a plug for >electronic organs, I prefer pipe organs any day, but here is a case >where the electronic organ is far more effective. Admit it or not, that >is so.It is easy for organists with something of the order of 4/58 pipe >organs to pontificate on what the rest of us should play but if you had >to come down to 5 ranks yourselves with no pedal organ and no enclosure >you might find it a little more frustrating than you will admit. > > As for the gentleman who doesn't think church organs are for the organ >literature, what is wrong with my wanting to play a Bach P and F as a >postlude? How do I do it without a pedal organ? OK the Johannus does a >mighty job with such a postlude. Unfortunately the Catholics can't sing, >so as hymn accompaniment it is largely a solo instrument but that's >another story. >Bob Elms. > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >