PipeChat Digest #2594 - Friday, December 21, 2001
 
RE: St. John the Divine
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
DTMF Tone Frequencies
  by "Bob Richardson" <bob@peak.org>
Re: music downloads (X-posted)
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: Leather
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Electronic basses
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Re: St. John the Divine
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: St. John the Divine
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
fauxbourdon help (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: St. John the Divine From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 17:21:32 -0500   >PS I am so asshamed to say I've lived in NYC all my life and even attended Columbia University but 2 blocks away from the Cathedral and I've never been there. NEVER.   Amazing, for an organist.   I think I first heard about the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine around age 12, in reading E.M. Skinner's book _The Modern Organ_. In ignorance I dismissed it then as just another large church in a faraway place, of no particular interest aside from the organ it contained. Then one unforgettable rainy Saturday afternoon when I was 14 or barely 15, I took = up a guidebook of the cathedral dating from the early 50s, left by the = previous owners of the house that we had recently moved into. I was astonished by the scale of the building as well as by the wealth of details, such that a page or a whole chapter could be devoted to just one small portion or = aspect of it.   As another result of reading this book, I began to appreciate for the = first time the high calling of church music, in particular, as a profession. Until then being a "concert organist" sounded much more exciting, with church music as a pleasant hobby, rather than the kind of endeavor that inspires people to devote their lives to it. But clearly, whoever played the organ and directed the choir in a place like St. John the Divine was = no Miss Suzie. More like a demigod. As soon as I learned his name, he = became one of my idols, a status only reinforced by subsequent experiences.   When, the next summer, we were making an extended family trip to the east coast-- the first in my life-- my parents fully appreciated that this building was my personal destination above all, such that I would feel betrayed if we failed to do see it. Before reaching New York, we visited D.C. and Washington Cathedral, which stole my awe not only by being the first such building I walked into, but by the fact that the organ was playing at the same moment, I made so bold as to ignore the barriers and head for the console, and Mr. Dirksen spoke with me personably for a = couple minutes rather than shooing me crossly away. By the time we got to the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, I'm afraid that my first impression = was disappointment that nothing had been done on its construction since before WWII. We didn't hear the organ or attend a service on that occasion, so although I was thrilled enough to visit, it suffered a little by = comparison with Washington. It continued to fire my imagination, however, and over = the years has only grown in my affection and fascination. Now I try to stop = in at least annually.   Admittedly, there are plenty of touristy places in the Philadelphia area that visitors flock to immediately, but which I have not seen since I was = a tourist, if ever. But Saint John the Divine is much more than a tourist trap. Please don't continue to deprive yourself of the experience.   Paul    
(back) Subject: DTMF Tone Frequencies From: "Bob Richardson" <bob@peak.org> Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 14:59:53 -0800 (PST)   Here are the frequencies that I dug up from my old DTMF program... if anyone tunes pipes to these for kicks, I'd love to hear a recording of them in use. (I feel a song title emerging - "Voicemail Jail" to the tune of Jailhouse Rock plus the DTMF pipework...)   The seven pipe frequencies you need would be:   "Column 1" - 1209 Hz "Column 2" - 1336 Hz "Column 3" - 1477 Hz "Row 1" - 697 Hz "Row 2" - 770 Hz "Row 3" - 852 Hz "Row 4" - 941 Hz   For total accuracy, you'll need pipes voiced to make a very pure tone (little or no harmonics - we're aiming for a sine wave), and minimal chiff or wind noise. (Think "Hammond" sound...)   For DTMF purists, the "Row" pipes should be slightly quieter than the "Column" pipes.   Here is a table of the two-note combinations needed to produce each "touch tone":   Tone | RowFreq | ColFreq   "1", 697, 1209 "2", 697, 1336 "3", 697, 1477   "4", 770, 1209 "5", 770, 1336 "6", 770, 1477   "7", 852, 1209 "8", 852, 1336 "9", 852, 1477   "*", 941, 1209 "0", 941, 1336 "#", 941, 1477   Also, there are definitions for an additional column of symbols "A","B","C","D", that don't appear on regular phones. This column has a frequency of 1633, and the same row frequencies.   Now you can call your bank and check your balance without having to remove your hands from the console! :-)   Bob Richardson      
(back) Subject: Re: music downloads (X-posted) From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 17:24:41 -0600   I'd love to receive copies of your music. Sibelius format is great and = we'll see about performing some of your work in the new year.   Merry Christmas, Russ Greene St. Andrew's Anglican Church (Woodhaven)    
(back) Subject: Re: Leather From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 19:30:14 EST   Dear List   The discussion about leather has really intrigued me, especially since some leather has lasted nearly 100 years. I got out my book on the Aging of Organ Leather ISBN 0-913499-03-X. A cursory overview revealed that Whale oil, and an excess of 3.5% Cr2O3 chromium salt were definate ingredients in tensil strength and longevity. The mechanical properties of the leather were benefitted by the introduction of certain oils. The closer the residual chromium went to 4% the longer the leather lasted. Oil P was also a factor but not specifically identified. it could have been = white petroleum jelly. (Vasaline) brand name! Vegeatable tanning introduced Calcium Oxalate which was found in Kimball leathers. Only a trace of chrome was found, but also lasted a long time.   It appears that some builders tanned their own leathers to meet specific criteria, for various uses within the organ. Do organ builders still take this kind of time, and practice these skills? It seems most now rely on the word of the supplier. In the old days leather was spcifically tanned and the process documented as to quality.   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Electronic basses From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 22:44:04 EST     --part1_145.6b3280b.29540a04_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I thought I to could distinguish between the electronic and acoustical = bass notes, until...   At the 2001 ATOS Convention in Indianapolis we heard Donna Parker play in = the cathedral. An awesome performance was heard by all. Not until after the performance did I learn that the pipe organ was equipped with several bass =   extensions (Walker, I believe), AND a couple of reeds were also = electronic.   The accoustics in that cathedral were ideal with a several second reverberation. Perhaps electronics fare as well in ideal spaces as do the real things!?!?!   Stan Krider     --part1_145.6b3280b.29540a04_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I thought I to could = distinguish between the electronic and acoustical bass notes, until...<BR> <BR> At the 2001 ATOS Convention in Indianapolis we heard Donna Parker play in = the cathedral. An awesome performance was heard by all. Not until after = the performance did I learn that the pipe organ was equipped with several = bass extensions (Walker, I believe), AND a couple of reeds were also = electronic.<BR> <BR> The accoustics in that cathedral were ideal with a several second = reverberation. Perhaps electronics fare as well in ideal spaces as do the = real things!?!?!<BR> <BR> Stan Krider<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_145.6b3280b.29540a04_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: St. John the Divine From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 23:43:32 EST     --part1_17.207999aa.295417f4_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I live in Oklahoma and I have been to St. John the Divine Cathedral about = 4 times, the Empire State building, the Statue of Liberty, and other points = of interest, besides attending the Symphony and Met. My daughter lives in = Port Washington and my granddaughter is my "tour" guide when I am there. Once = on a Greyline tour of Manhattan, we stopped at St. John the Divine, and the organist was practicing. I crept up to the organ to watch as well as = listen, and the tour guide lost me for a few minutes. But it was worth it. Lee   --part1_17.207999aa.295417f4_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000ff" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Goudy Old Style" LANG=3D"0"><B>I live in Oklahoma = and I have been to St. John the Divine Cathedral about 4 times, the Empire = State building, the Statue of Liberty, and other points of interest, = besides attending the Symphony and Met.&nbsp; My daughter lives in Port = Washington and my granddaughter is my "tour" guide when I am there.&nbsp; = Once on a Greyline tour of Manhattan, we stopped at St. John the Divine, = and the organist was practicing.&nbsp; I crept up to the organ to watch as = well as listen, and the tour guide lost me for a few minutes.&nbsp; But it = was worth it.&nbsp; Lee</B></FONT></HTML>   --part1_17.207999aa.295417f4_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: St. John the Divine From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 23:46:55 EST     --part1_17.207a3c28.295418bf_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   There was a concert this evening (Thursday) at St. John the Divine. They = are doing a massive clean up to get ready for the weekend.   Neil B   --part1_17.207a3c28.295418bf_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>There was a concert this evening (Thursday) at St. John the = Divine. &nbsp;They are doing a massive clean up to get ready for the = weekend. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Neil B</FONT></HTML>   --part1_17.207a3c28.295418bf_boundary--  
(back) Subject: fauxbourdon help (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 22:39:58 -0800   I need some additional fauxbourdons ... I've got about 15 ... I need 50 (grin) ...   Those of you who have received the music downloads know the style and degree of difficulty ... if not, it's   recitation chord 2 measures in 4/4 recitation chord 3 measures in 4/4   SATB, limited ranges no diminutions beyond an eighth note recitation in eighth notes; mediations and cadences in quarters and eighths, basically   If anyone knows of sources, or if anyone wants to try their hand at WRITING some, please let me know. I can receive PDF or Sibelius files.   I've got someone copying some from Musica Divina, so I already know about that. I have the Burgess Tonale, but those are all in free rhythm .... I'd like to keep the same style I started in.   Yeah, like anybody has time to think about this right now ... (grin)   My Christmas service is going to be SO dull ... oh well ... That's What The Rector Ordered.   Cheers,   Bud