PipeChat Digest #2608 - Saturday, December 29, 2001
 
NC OHS Convention, 2001 - Report No. 3
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, Allen and Rodgers
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
My Very Best Blooper! Androgyny unchained!
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: NC OHS Convention, 2001 - Report No. 3 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 29 Dec 2001 13:17:05 -0500   Dear Lists and Friends,   After a rather "complicated" late summer and fall, I seem to be = functioning on all cylinders again, and thought it time to finish up reporting on the last wonderful OHS Convention in North Carolina before the next wonderful OHS Convention begins in Chicago this summer on the evening of June 25th. So, here is report number 3. The first two appeared late last summer, and = if anyone wants them again, I will gladly resend them privately. There will = be five more. If it's all too much, there is always that ever-useful Delete key. The following link lists the organs and venues to be visited at the Chicago Convention. There is no information yet about artists, but that = will come in due time, so keep watching the space. (http://www.organsociety.org/html/convention/chicago/sched.html)   OHS 2001 - Report No. 3, Saturday, June 23rd.   It's Saturday at the OHS Convention 2001 - one has to remind oneself what day it is from time to time, as they have a lot in common! This day began with John Farmer's fascinating lecture on the history of the much = travelled Skinner (Opus 248 of 1916), now comfortably and happily living in the great Vanderbilt mansion, Biltmore, in Asheville, NC, thanks to John's alertness and = skilled ministration to the instrument. The following rather long Internet address will give you the story in some detail: < http://www.biltmore.com/just_for_media/news_releases/whats_new_concert_orga= n ..html > and the following, slightly less long address will show you the handsome console: < http://www.biltmore.com/visit/biltmore_house/pipe_organ.html >. There = are a few infelicities, like a "genuine forced-air organ," and other quaint oddities, but if you don't know Biltmore, or even if you do, this is all interesting reading. My thanks to Harry Martenas for locating these sites. Next we boarded our six buses for the longest bus journey of the convention, a bit less than three hours. We were shown a rather good video about the Biltmore mansion on the coach. The Ashville part of North Carolina is wonderfully hilly, as is the town itself, giving the bus drivers some anxious moments maneuvering the sometimes narrow streets, including the one which brought us to Mount Zion Missionary = Baptist Church.   Presiding over Felgemaker Opus 713, 1901, two-manuals and 26 stops, was = Will Headlee, always a wonderful presence at these conventions, and usually = (and this time) arriving (from Syracuse, NY!) on his motorcycle. He spent some years of his life in Asheville, so this was something of a home-coming. Preparing for his concert, he had spent a few days in this church, and had enjoyed the kindness and hospitality of the church staff, so his first gesture before beginning to play was to introduce the church's organist, = who had been particularly helpful. The next thoughtful gesture, this time of respect for the organ's lineage, was to play the first movement of the Mendelssohn A Major Sonata only on original Felgemaker sounds - distinguished and beautiful sounds they are, too. For the Andante, he used the original strings so we could also hear those, although, as Will said, this might not be the way one would ordinarily register this movement. = Next we heard two choral preludes by the Alsatian/American(!) composer Ludwig Lenel (b. 1914) of whom we had already heard one piece at the hands of = Jock Darling. I think Will said he learned these pieces with Arthur Poister at Oberlin. The first, a setting of "Now praise we Christ, the Holy One," is = a charming quiet work for the Flutes. The second, "How brightly shines the morning star" is a big, busy, and very exciting work.   Then we heard one of the great charmers of the choral prelude repertoire, = a piece I play from the ever useful 1951 Church Organist's Golden Treasury = of Carl Pfatteicher and Archibald Davison, Volume 3 - "Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan" of Johann Peter Kellner (1705-1772). This was followed by one = of those lovely slow-fast Boyce Voluntaries, No. 1 in D Major (Larghetto-Vivace). This organ really does sing. I think everyone realized that we were in the presence of royalty, an organ with distinguished beginnings well and lovingly restored tonally and mechanically, with some additions, by John Farmer and Company. Also, somehow, in its simplicity, = the organ is really fine visually as well.   Then, for a change of pace and period, two pieces from the 1944 "Baroques" of Seth Bingham, an American composer (1882-1972) who perhaps does not get played enough. One hears the stunning Roulade once in a while, the last = time for me courtesy of Ken Cowan. Will gave us the Sarabande and Rhythmic Trumpet, both wonderful music. Joe Utterback (b. 1944) is our neighbor up here in Connecticut, and belongs to our AGO chapter. He is an astonishing jazz pianist, powerful and subtle at the same time, and has tried to fuse jazz elements into organ and other church music. We heard two pieces of = the Three Spirituals of 1993, Balm in Gilead (Ballad) and Swing Low (Blues for Manuals). Ralph Simpson (b. 1933) has been most recently at Tennessee = State University. We heard his Fantasy on "Roll, Jordan, Roll," a really great = fun piece (published by Morning Star).   You'll be tired of my bragging about our noteworthy hymn singing by now, = so I will only mention that we sang an 1875 hymn, "I am thine, O Lord," and that we were given the kind of instructions we like: Stanzas 1 & 4, = Harmony throughout, Stanza 2, sopranos & altos, and Stanza 3, men (refrain sung softly)! I love recitalists at these conventions who clearly take hymn singing (and playing) seriously. This whole recital was an Occasion of Importance, a great player and an historic and worthy instrument indeed.   I first met the Britts, Carol and Bennett, from Thibodaux, Louisiana, more than a few years ago at an AGO regional convention centered on Wilmington, Delaware. We have been good "convention friends" since then, and now, = after all that time, I finally got to hear Carol play. Someone with taste and discernment asked her to play at this convention. Carol is one of a long line of great players who studied with Warren Hutton at U. of Alabama, = from which institution she has a D.M.A. She is Organist and Choir Director at = St. Augustine's Episcopal Church in Metairie, and is a superb player with a distinct style and voice. I loved her recital, although as a first OHS recital player, she was consigned to a single manual instrument! Not to worry - she chose her program carefully, and it worked really well. (The instrument is by Rueben Midmer, from 1898, original to this building - St. Matthias' Episcopal Church, and we are still in Asheville.) Ponder this = from the program note: "Original to the church, the Midmer organ is in a remarkable state of preservation. Apart from maintenance and some patching to the bellows leather, the instrument is essentially as installed 103 = years ago." Was that a good investment or what? The only limitation of this instrument, given its small size, appeared to be that with only a 16 Pedal Bourdon = plus coupler, without coupling, there was not enough strength and definition in the Pedal, and with coupler, it was sometimes too much. Not to worry! We first heard a Triptych: Prelude, Scherzo, and Fugue, by Robert Powell (b. 1932), written for Carol Britt in 2000. This = is a fine work, and how nice to have it custom made for one - perhaps with = this performance on a single manual instrument in mind. It was a good fit. = Next, a bit of Louisiana-ana, I guess! Nicholls's Grand Triumphal March (1877), = a real two-step played with wonderful panache. Carol informed us that the eponymous Nicholls was a governor of the State of Louisiana. To play the Partita on = O Gott, du frommer Gott of Bach on an instrument with limited variety takes a bit of work. With impeccable phrasing and some careful registration planning, = this really was a fine and arresting performance. It made perfect sense for us = to next sing O Gott, du frommer Gott, and we did indeed, happily with some directions for harmony and unison verses. This was a great recital, and I hope future convention planners will remember it in choosing artists for = the years ahead.   Our next move was well up the social ladder, as we visited the Vanderbilts in their stately home, Biltmore, in Asheville. We had a lovely dinner in "The Stable" on the estate, and then proceeded to the main house where we got to hear the organ, played partly by the Skinner player mechanism, and partly by Kristin Gronning Farmer. Kristin, who chaired this convention, = and whose good and thoughtful work in that capacity we benefitted from daily, has also played for OHS conventions in the past, including Boston last = year. In addition to which, she is an organ builder, working with her husband, John Farmer, and specializing in "gilding, pipe stencilling, polychrome painting and faux finishes" which skills she makes avialable not only to = the "family firm," but also to other builders. She's a great and energetic = lady, organist, organbuilder, husband, and mother - wow! After she gave us a demonstration of some of the resources of the instrument, she let us = sample some of what is available on the Skinner semi-automatic rolls. It was all good fun. The organ, which began life in a private home in Armonk, NY, = then moved to the Presbyterian Church in Bedford, NY, and then into storage in Mount Vernon, NY, finally, thanks to John Farmer, found its way where, although neither it nor Mr. Skinner knew it, it really belonged all the time. I thought I knew that I belonged there too, but no one would listen! Anyway, this is a = really felicitous success story, and I assume the many visitors who flock to Biltmore each year get a taste of a real organ, and a fine one at that, = made possible most of the time by the presence of the player mechanism. It is happy-making that John Farmer's vision was matched by those in charge of this wonderful house. On the three hour trip back to Winston-Salem, there was lots of Schnarrwerk in evidence - it had been a long but good day.   By the way, the website created for the convention is still active, and if you go to the OHS site (www.organsociety.org) and click on "Conventions," you will find at the bottom, links to "Previous conventions with active websites." If you are following my narratives, you will find some really excellent pictures to go with them on this site.   Malcolm Wechsler, freezing in Connecticut!                
(back) Subject: Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Sat, 29 Dec 2001 14:05:57 -0600   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --Boundary_(ID_Be9HsyvJmueaWypc10wq9w) Content-type: text/plain; charset=3DISO-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 12/28/01 9:09 PM, Ross & Lynda Wards wrote:   > I've spent two hours on this Liverpool machine. It feels great - and = soun=3D ds > great, too. Still, I suppose the electronic supporters feel allen or = rodg=3D ers > or some other make could have done better :-)   Hi Ross, I am an ardent pipe lover and have been all my life. Given the budget and given the space and given good acoustics, pipes are king =3DAD no digital = can touch them.=3D20   At the same time, I am open enough to acknowledge that digitals have their place and in situations of limited funds, limited space and/or poor acoustics, a digital or a combination digital/pipe instrument may be a better solution. I suspect that a lot of so-called electronic supporters = ar=3D e in more or less that same space.   But the snide, pretentious comment you make about electronic supporters feeling that Allen or Rodgers etc. could have done better than the = Liverpoo=3D l Cathedral organ is downright silly, unworthy of you frankly. Because = that=3DB9s never been the comparison. The Liverpool Cathedral organ is one of the world=3DB9s great instruments. With 146 stops spread over 7 divisions, its pipework occupies a space larger than many churches and its replacement = cos=3D t would be at least $3 million, perhaps nearer to $4 million.   The real-world comparison, right where most of us actually live, is = whether to have a one-manual continuo organ or a forty-stop two-manual = Allen/Rodger=3D s at the same cost; or a two-manual and pedal, 5 stop tracker vs. an eighty-stop three-manual Allen/Rodgers at the same cost. And yes, there = are valid opinions on both sides of THAT question.   But whether Liverpool Cathedral=3DB9s organ could be surpassed by a = monster Allen/Rodgers (presumably, to equal the replacement cost, an 8-manual, 932 stop behemoth with 100,000 watts of power through 840 speaker cabinets) - well, Ross, that=3DB9s just silly!   Happy New Year, Russ Greene Organist & Choral Director St. Andrew=3DB9s Anglican Church (Woodhaven) Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada   --Boundary_(ID_Be9HsyvJmueaWypc10wq9w) Content-type: text/html; charset=3DISO-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D"Helvetica">On 12/28/01 9:09 PM, Ross &amp; Lynda Wards = wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D"Helvetica">I've spent two hours on this = Liverpool machine. It feels great - and sounds great, too. Still, I = suppose the electronic supporters feel allen or rodgers or some other make = could have done better :-)<BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D"Helvetica"><BR> Hi Ross,<BR> I am an ardent pipe lover and have been all my life. Given the budget and = given the space and given good acoustics, pipes are king &#8211; no = digital can touch them. <BR> <BR> At the same time, I am open enough to acknowledge that digitals have their = place and in situations of limited funds, limited space and/or poor = acoustics, a digital or a combination digital/pipe instrument may be a = better solution. I suspect that a lot of so-called electronic supporters = are in more or less that same space.<BR> <BR> But the snide, pretentious comment you make about electronic supporters = feeling that Allen or Rodgers etc. could have done better than the = Liverpool Cathedral organ is downright silly, unworthy of you frankly. = Because that&#8217;s never been the comparison. The Liverpool Cathedral = organ is one of the world&#8217;s great instruments. With 146 stops spread = over 7 divisions, its pipework occupies a space larger than many churches = and its replacement cost would be at least $3 million, perhaps nearer to = $4 million.<BR> <BR> The real-world comparison, right where most of us actually live, is = whether to have a one-manual continuo organ or a forty-stop two-manual Allen/Rodgers at the same cost; or a two-manual and pedal, 5 stop = tracker vs. an eighty-stop three-manual Allen/Rodgers at the same cost. = And yes, there are valid opinions on both sides of THAT question.<BR> <BR> But whether Liverpool Cathedral&#8217;s organ could be surpassed by a = monster Allen/Rodgers (presumably, to equal the replacement cost, an = 8-manual, 932 stop behemoth with 100,000 watts of power through 840 = speaker cabinets) - well, Ross, that&#8217;s just silly!<BR> <BR> Happy New Year,<BR> Russ Greene<BR> Organist &amp; Choral Director<BR> St. Andrew&#8217;s Anglican Church (Woodhaven)<BR> Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada</FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --Boundary_(ID_Be9HsyvJmueaWypc10wq9w)--  
(back) Subject: Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, Allen and Rodgers From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 29 Dec 2001 12:35:23 -0800   Gentlemen, retire to your respective corners and take a Chill Pill (grin).   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Sat, 29 Dec 2001 15:27:59 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000E_01C1907D.65E36E40 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Re: Liverpool Anglican CathedralDear Russ, I was recently at the Midnight Mass at Packer Chapel. The pipe =3D organ there has had a major overhaul to the tune of $500,000.Austin =3D rebuilt the pipe portion and Allen furnished the console and 9 digital =3D voices. We all have heard both the electronics and the pipe version as =3D well as combinations of each. The service was played by Greg Kuklinski a = =3D friend of mine and he excelled, as usual. Listening to the organ and =3D especially the string division as well as the bell stops (which I will =3D identify whenever I get over there again) in which Greg played the =3D "Carole of the Bells" was fantastic.=3D20 I must say that I was inspired and emotionally moved by that =3D experience but I also know that there is a great difference between this = =3D organ and a small 9 rank pipe organ in a much smaller church with =3D limited acoustics. I believe that there is a place for both the digital = =3D and the pipe organ but limited only by space, budget and acoustics. I know of an Allen installation that would sound much better with = =3D an Alesis Reverb unit and better speaker placement. Due to the aspiring = =3D architect with his ideas of a church designed like a "theater in the =3D round" this church must have the worst acoustics in the world. No organ, = =3D no matter what cost, pipe, digital or combination, could make up for the = =3D acoustical disaster of this design.The present organ, being digital, =3D could probably,given Allen's interest in public relations, be adjusted =3D if their acoustical engineer attended to it. As for a pipe organ =3D installation, due to an inability to control the reverb time, or the =3D somewhat physical placement space of divisions, I don;t think that any =3D pipe organ installation could solve this problem. =3D20 Paul ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: Russ Greene=3D20 To: PipeChat=3D20 Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2001 3:05 PM Subject: Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral     On 12/28/01 9:09 PM, Ross & Lynda Wards wrote:     I've spent two hours on this Liverpool machine. It feels great - and = =3D sounds great, too. Still, I suppose the electronic supporters feel allen = =3D or rodgers or some other make could have done better :-)     Hi Ross, I am an ardent pipe lover and have been all my life. Given the budget = =3D and given the space and given good acoustics, pipes are king - no =3D digital can touch them.=3D20   At the same time, I am open enough to acknowledge that digitals have =3D their place and in situations of limited funds, limited space and/or =3D poor acoustics, a digital or a combination digital/pipe instrument may =3D be a better solution. I suspect that a lot of so-called electronic =3D supporters are in more or less that same space.   But the snide, pretentious comment you make about electronic =3D supporters feeling that Allen or Rodgers etc. could have done better =3D than the Liverpool Cathedral organ is downright silly, unworthy of you =3D frankly. Because that's never been the comparison. The Liverpool =3D Cathedral organ is one of the world's great instruments. With 146 stops = =3D spread over 7 divisions, its pipework occupies a space larger than many = =3D churches and its replacement cost would be at least $3 million, perhaps = =3D nearer to $4 million.   The real-world comparison, right where most of us actually live, is =3D whether to have a one-manual continuo organ or a forty-stop two-manual =3D Allen/Rodgers at the same cost; or a two-manual and pedal, 5 stop =3D tracker vs. an eighty-stop three-manual Allen/Rodgers at the same cost. = =3D And yes, there are valid opinions on both sides of THAT question.   But whether Liverpool Cathedral's organ could be surpassed by a =3D monster Allen/Rodgers (presumably, to equal the replacement cost, an =3D 8-manual, 932 stop behemoth with 100,000 watts of power through 840 =3D speaker cabinets) - well, Ross, that's just silly!   Happy New Year, Russ Greene Organist & Choral Director St. Andrew's Anglican Church (Woodhaven) Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada=3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000E_01C1907D.65E36E40 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD><TITLE>Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral</TITLE> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4611.1300" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Dear Russ,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I was = recently =3D at the=3D20 Midnight Mass at Packer Chapel. The pipe organ there has had a major =3D overhaul to=3D20 the tune of $500,000.Austin rebuilt the pipe portion and Allen furnished = =3D the=3D20 console and 9 digital voices. We all have heard both the electronics and = =3D the=3D20 pipe version as well as combinations of each. The service was played by = =3D Greg=3D20 Kuklinski a friend of mine and he excelled, as usual. Listening to the =3D organ and=3D20 especially the string division as well as the bell stops (which I will =3D identify=3D20 whenever I get over there again) in which Greg played the "Carole of the = =3D Bells"=3D20 was fantastic. </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I must say = =3D that I was=3D20 inspired and emotionally moved by that experience but I also know that =3D there is=3D20 a great difference between this organ and a small 9 rank pipe organ in a = =3D much=3D20 smaller church with limited acoustics. I believe that there is a =3D place&nbsp; for=3D20 both the digital and the pipe organ but limited only by&nbsp;space, =3D budget and=3D20 acoustics.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;I know = =3D of an Allen=3D20 installation that would sound much better with an Alesis Reverb unit and = =3D better=3D20 speaker placement. Due to the aspiring architect with his ideas of a =3D church=3D20 designed like a "theater in the round" this church must have the worst =3D acoustics=3D20 in the world. No organ, no matter what cost, pipe, digital or =3D combination, could=3D20 make up for the acoustical disaster of this design.The present organ, =3D being=3D20 digital, could probably,given Allen's interest in public relations, be =3D adjusted=3D20 if their acoustical engineer attended to it. As for a pipe organ =3D installation,=3D20 due to an inability to control the reverb time, or the somewhat physical = =3D   placement space&nbsp;of divisions, I don;t think that any pipe organ=3D20 installation could solve this problem. &nbsp;</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial=3D20 size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbs= =3D p;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= =3D ;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;= =3D &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&= =3D nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D2= 0 Paul</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV=3D20 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><B>From:</B>=3D20 <A title=3D3Drggreene2@shaw.ca href=3D3D"mailto:rggreene2@shaw.ca">Russ = =3D Greene</A>=3D20 </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A =3D title=3D3Dpipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">PipeChat</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Saturday, December 29, = =3D 2001 3:05=3D20 PM</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: Liverpool Anglican = =3D   Cathedral</DIV> <DIV><BR></DIV><FONT face=3D3DHelvetica>On 12/28/01 9:09 PM, Ross &amp; = =3D Lynda=3D20 Wards wrote:<BR><BR></FONT> <BLOCKQUOTE><FONT face=3D3DHelvetica>I've spent two hours on this =3D Liverpool=3D20 machine. It feels great - and sounds great, too. Still, I suppose =3D the=3D20 electronic supporters feel allen or rodgers or some other make could = =3D have=3D20 done better :-)<BR></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT face=3D3DHelvetica><BR>Hi = =3D Ross,<BR>I=3D20 am an ardent pipe lover and have been all my life. Given the budget =3D and given=3D20 the space and given good acoustics, pipes are king &#8211; no digital = =3D can touch=3D20 them. <BR><BR>At the same time, I am open enough to acknowledge that =3D digitals=3D20 have their place and in situations of limited funds, limited space =3D and/or poor=3D20 acoustics, a digital or a combination digital/pipe instrument may be a = =3D better=3D20 solution. I suspect that a lot of so-called electronic supporters are = =3D in more=3D20 or less that same space.<BR><BR>But the snide, pretentious comment you = =3D make=3D20 about electronic supporters feeling that Allen or Rodgers etc. could =3D have done=3D20 better than the Liverpool Cathedral organ is downright silly, unworthy = =3D of you=3D20 frankly. Because that&#8217;s never been the comparison. The Liverpool = =3D Cathedral=3D20 organ is one of the world&#8217;s great instruments. With 146 stops =3D spread over 7=3D20 divisions, its pipework occupies a space larger than many churches and = =3D its=3D20 replacement cost would be at least $3 million, perhaps nearer to $4=3D20 million.<BR><BR>The real-world comparison, right where most of us =3D actually=3D20 live, is whether to have a one-manual continuo organ or a = forty-stop=3D20 two-manual Allen/Rodgers at the same cost; or a two-manual and pedal, = =3D 5 stop=3D20 tracker vs. an eighty-stop three-manual Allen/Rodgers at the same =3D cost. And=3D20 yes, there are valid opinions on both sides of THAT =3D question.<BR><BR>But=3D20 whether Liverpool Cathedral&#8217;s organ could be surpassed by a =3D monster=3D20 Allen/Rodgers (presumably, to equal the replacement cost, an 8-manual, = =3D 932=3D20 stop behemoth with 100,000 watts of power through 840 speaker =3D cabinets) -=3D20 well, Ross, that&#8217;s just silly!<BR><BR>Happy New Year,<BR>Russ=3D20 Greene<BR>Organist &amp; Choral Director<BR>St. Andrew&#8217;s =3D Anglican Church=3D20 (Woodhaven)<BR>Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada</FONT> =3D </BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000E_01C1907D.65E36E40--    
(back) Subject: Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 29 Dec 2001 16:21:32 -0500   This message came in the form of an attachment which I cannot open. I suspect I'm not alone. It would be nice if folks woudl simply send the message itself as a regualr e-mail message but NOT as as an attachment.   > From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Sat, 29 Dec 2001 15:27:59 -0500 > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral > >    
(back) Subject: My Very Best Blooper! Androgyny unchained! From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 29 Dec 2001 17:16:55 -0500   Dear Lists and Friends,   A very sharp-eyed friend picked up the following, written by me, myself, = and I, and no one else in my recent posting about day 3 of the 2001 OHS Convention! It is in reference to the indefatigable Kristin Farmer. It is possible that some of you will have to read this twice to see what is = wrong, since we, like spell and grammar check programs, don't always see mistakes when they involve perfectly good words, albeit misused!   "She's a great and energetic lady, organist, organbuilder, husband, and mother - wow!"   Enjoy,   Malcolm Wechsler