PipeChat Digest #2612 - Sunday, December 30, 2001
 
Re: Liverpool Shocking Facts
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Used Pipe Organs
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Packer Chapel
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Used Pipe Organs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Used Pipe Organs
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Used Pipe Organs
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Used Pipe Organs
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Malcolm's 24 degree service
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Frigid Digits
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: Frigid Digits
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Shocking Facts
  by "Antoni Scott" <ascott@epix.net>
Re: Shocking Facts
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Packer Chapel
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Shocking Facts
  by "youngstown fireapp" <yfd4@hotmail.com>
A peaceful day in hell - Christmas 1A
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Liverpool Shocking Facts
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Liverpool Anglican Cathedral prepared-for divisions
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral prepared-for divisions
  by "youngstown fireapp" <yfd4@hotmail.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Liverpool Shocking Facts From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 04:19:57 -0800   Relax Sebastian, I have been poring over the stoplist of Liverpool Cathedral since I was knee high to a grasshopper and that is a long time ago. It was then the largest in the world till surpassed by Hamburg (Or was it after Hamburg? I forget). Now with the Military Trumpet it must be mindblowing. But that doesn't stop me dreaming. Relax! We can be too narrow in our views.Why restrict discussion? Oh yes! They are organs but not pipe organs. My dictionary gives one definition of "organ" as "keyboard instrument that gives a similar effect (to a pipe organ)". Bob Elms.   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > Dear Pipechatters: > The Willis organ, in its evolved form, still represents a = significant monument in Western musical history, from the extraordinary = scales that had to be developed when dealing with a room of such vast = proportions, to the famous Grand Chorus and its controvesial = recomposition, to its mere survival over the decades, to its tonal design = -- past, present, and as originally intended. The planned-for sections = of the original design are a long discussion in and of themselves. > So why do we have DOZENS of postings with a Liverpool heading that = have NOTHING to do with this organ? Here we have an opportunity to = discuss, learn, and examine one of the great technological and musical = achievements of the last hundred years, and we're talking about devices = that aren't even organs. > Let's not lose opportunities here... > > Sebastian Matthaus Gluck > New York City >  
(back) Subject: Re: Used Pipe Organs From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 04:26:10 -0800   I think Jim has a point there. A number of ex-UK pipe organs have been transplanted to my state, quite successfully. However many of our churches have not the floor space since most of these are Victorian era tracker instruments which occupy a lot of space, and ceiling height. Many of the new organs built here in the last 50 years are small extension organs and have had to be bracketted to a wall with a small console on the floor in the most convenient spot. You have to be in the situation to appreciate this. It is useless guessing from a long distance away.You ay get the wrong picture.   Wurlibird1@aol.com wrote: > > Greetings to all, > > A recent comment about <used> pipe organs as alternatives to new = digitals gives rise to concern. This suggestion may in some cases be a = viable alternative. It can equally lead to considerable disappointment = if mismatch occurs. >  
(back) Subject: Re: Packer Chapel From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 06:35:08 -0600   Glenda wrote:   > It seems that on my first visit to Pennsylvania > I visited the small town of Ma Chunck (I have no > idea how this is spelled, because I never saw > the name of the town in written form).However, > Packer=92s home was located nearby and a St. > Mark=92s Episcopal Church was built into the > mountain. I believe the guide at the church > credited Packer with the money for the church > and perhaps the organ.I had forgotten all about > that place until Paul said the words =93Packer > Chapel=94, which brought to mind both > the LehighUniversity chapel and the church in > the town which changed its name to Jim Thorpe. > The town now known as Jim Thorpe was originally known as Mauch Chunk, which in the local native American dialect meant "bear mountain". The church there was indeed heavily endowed by the Packer family. There are two Packer mansions nearby, one built by Asa Packer and the other (not open to the public) built by his alcoholic son Harry. The Asa Packer mansion is well worth seeing for its beautiful furnishings, including a bed the same as Abraham Lincoln's, and a pipe organ with player mechanism, which (at least the last time I was there) was operating. Packer was heavily into everything to do with Abraham Lincoln, not least because he bore an uncanny resemblance to him. He was not always tremendously kind to his workers on the Lehigh Valley Railway. He used to sit at his window with a telescope every morning and get a servant to go out and fire anyone who was late to work. His son-in-law Robert Sayre gave his name to the town of Sayre, where the Lehigh Valley loco shops were located and where there is now a large regional hospital. He was largely responsible for building and endowing the Cathedral of the Nativity in Bethlehem. Another of Packer's daughters had never married, and since she was anxious to have the status of a married woman the family paid a Lehigh Valley Railroad conductor $100,000 to marry her and then disappear and never be seen again. This daughter then became Mrs. Cummings and lived in solitary splendor in the Asa Packer mansion after her father died following a fall down the stairs.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Used Pipe Organs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 06:59:37 -0600   I would personally not recommend transplanting ex-UK organs to America as = a general rule. It is true that it has on occasions been done = successfully, but the organs concerned have generally needed quite a bit = of work. The main problem is that older UK and European organs were built with air-dried lumber, = which simply does not stand up to the American climate, especially after = it has been subjected to very damp conditions bringing it across the = Atlantic. Back in the 1920's a bunch of Walcker organs were imported from Germany; they had = channeling in the bottomboards of the ventil chests and in no time these = had all cracked to pieces and the mechanism broke down. A number of Pels = organs with slider chests were imported from Holland in the 1950's and suffered much the same = fate. The Steinmeyer at Altoona only survived because Aeolian-Skinner = supplied new bottomboards to it. So if you import a secondhand British = organ, be prepared for having to make pretty much an entirely new mechanism. If the pipework = is exceptionally good this might be worth doing. None of this, of course, = applies to newly built British and European instruments, which are made = with kiln-dried lumber like American ones.   John Speller   Bob Elms wrote:   > I think Jim has a point there. A number of ex-UK pipe organs have been > transplanted to my state, quite successfully. However many of our > churches have not the floor space since most of these are Victorian era > tracker instruments which occupy a lot of space, and ceiling height. > Many of the new organs built here in the last 50 years are small > extension organs and have had to be bracketted to a wall with a small > console on the floor in the most convenient spot. You have to be in the > situation to appreciate this. It is useless guessing from a long > distance away.You ay get the wrong picture.      
(back) Subject: Re: Used Pipe Organs From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 07:27:37 -0600   At 10:34 PM 12/29/01 -0800, you wrote: > > Greetings to all, > > > > A recent comment about <used> pipe organs as alternatives to new = digitals > > gives rise to concern. This suggestion may in some cases be a viable > > alternative. It can equally lead to considerable disappointment if > mismatch > > occurs. > >   For those of us who attend OHS conventions have seen many successful transplants of historic organs through the Organ Clearing House. Much of these successes are matching the correct organ to its new home. That is where a good professional organ builder can be of immense help. There are many on this list with pipe organ expertise who could advise anyone seriously considering the option of a re-cycled pipe organ. Just any old organ will not do...as was pointed out in the earlier post, but that doesn't mean that it isn't a viable option. The Organ Clearing House has many exceptional instruments with years of wonderful music service left in =   them.   Just a thought...Happy New Year to All....   Jon    
(back) Subject: Re: Used Pipe Organs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 07:04:15 -0800   When I contacted Mander about a redundant British organ for St. Matthew's, = he told me virtually the same thing. And I had personal experience with = the early Harrison import at Cincinnati College-Conservatory ... Harrison = simply didn't take into account central HVAC and low humidity in U.S. buildings.   Cheers,   Bud   "John L. Speller" wrote:   > I would personally not recommend transplanting ex-UK organs to America = as a general rule. It is true that it has on occasions been done = successfully, but the organs concerned have generally needed quite a bit = of work. The main problem > is that older UK and European organs were built with air-dried lumber, = which simply does not stand up to the American climate, especially after = it has been subjected to very damp conditions bringing it across the = Atlantic. Back in the > 1920's a bunch of Walcker organs were imported from Germany; they had = channeling in the bottomboards of the ventil chests and in no time these = had all cracked to pieces and the mechanism broke down. A number of Pels = organs with slider > chests were imported from Holland in the 1950's and suffered much the = same fate. The Steinmeyer at Altoona only survived because = Aeolian-Skinner supplied new bottomboards to it. So if you import a = secondhand British organ, be prepared > for having to make pretty much an entirely new mechanism. If the = pipework is exceptionally good this might be worth doing. None of this, = of course, applies to newly built British and European instruments, which = are made with kiln-dried > lumber like American ones. > > John Speller > > Bob Elms wrote: > > > I think Jim has a point there. A number of ex-UK pipe organs have been > > transplanted to my state, quite successfully. However many of our > > churches have not the floor space since most of these are Victorian = era > > tracker instruments which occupy a lot of space, and ceiling height. > > Many of the new organs built here in the last 50 years are small > > extension organs and have had to be bracketted to a wall with a small > > console on the floor in the most convenient spot. You have to be in = the > > situation to appreciate this. It is useless guessing from a long > > distance away.You ay get the wrong picture. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Used Pipe Organs From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 12:57:21 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, December 30, 2001 10:04 AM Subject: Re: Used Pipe Organs     > When I contacted Mander about a redundant British organ for St. = Matthew's, he told me virtually the same thing. And I had personal experience with = the early Harrison import at Cincinnati College-Conservatory ... Harrison = simply didn't take > into account central HVAC and low humidity in U.S. buildings. > In addition to which, there is a great string of postwar Hill, Norman, & Beard instruments all the way across Canada, almost all of which split in all the wrong places. Well, there is no right place, really! The English = at that time assumed that we here in the Colonies, like them, wore our coats = in church, and expected to see the fog coming out of the mouths of choristers as they sang the service. We felt rather British this morning, the furnace having failed to go on at 5 a.m. like the thermostat asks it to. The = rector got there at 8 and got it going, but even by the 10 a.m. service, it was overly cool, this on one of our coolest mornings of the season - 24 = degrees F.   Builds character!   Cheers, and a very happy New Year to all.   Malcolm Wechsler      
(back) Subject: Malcolm's 24 degree service From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 14:28:41 EST     In a message dated 12/30/01 12:59:33 PM, manderusa@earthlink.net writes:   "By the 10 a.m. service, it was overly cool, this on one of our coolest mornings of the season - 24 degrees Farenheit. Builds character!"   And to think of the character it add to the reeds...   Happy New Year Seb    
(back) Subject: Frigid Digits From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 14:32:45 EST   Malcolm writes:   >We felt rather British this morning, the furnace >having failed to go on at 5 a.m. like the thermostat asks it to. The = rector >got there at 8 and got it going, but even by the 10 a.m. service, it was >overly cool, this on one of our coolest mornings of the season - 24 = degrees >F. <<   Malcolm, I can relate! Although we in central Texas were basking in +34 degrees F this morning, out heat did not turn on, either. The pastor is = out of town on a short vacation and I arrived about an hour before service = time. Ironically, my first thoughts upon arrival paralleled yours: Church of England (Methodist)! What a morning for a <fire and brimstone> sermon, = but alas, no such luck. At service's end the thermostat read 58 degrees in = the sanctuary. Needless to say, it was the shortest service of the year. :)   Warmest wishes (literally), Jim Pitts  
(back) Subject: Re: Frigid Digits From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 15:23:37 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, December 30, 2001 2:32 PM Subject: Frigid Digits     > > Malcolm, I can relate! Although we in central Texas were basking in +34 > degrees F this morning, out heat did not turn on, either. The pastor is out > of town on a short vacation and I arrived about an hour before service time. > Ironically, my first thoughts upon arrival paralleled yours: Church of > England (Methodist)! What a morning for a <fire and brimstone> sermon, but > alas, no such luck. At service's end the thermostat read 58 degrees in the > sanctuary. Needless to say, it was the shortest service of the year. = :)   Two or three years ago, on a Saturday, my partner and I were travelling north of Danbury in the dead of a cold winter, and realized that we could make Stephen Roberts's 4:30 Mass of Anticipation at St. Peter's, and have = a chance to visit with Stephen for a time. We walked into a freezing church, the furnace having failed completely. (The organ failed as well [on topic, on topic!], and my heart sank at the first sound of an out-of-tune Baldwin AcridSonic hastily wheeled in from somewhere!) As the Pastor ended the = Mass, he said: "Today, we have answered one of life's great questions - does the light go out in the refrigerator when you close the door? Here we are in = the fridge, and the lights are still on. Case closed."   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler      
(back) Subject: Shocking Facts From: "Antoni Scott" <ascott@epix.net> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 15:58:28 -0500   The Willis organ, in its evolved form, still represents a significant monument in Western musical history, from the extraordinary scales that had to be developed when dealing with a room of such vast proportions.   Was this the first organ to make use of double languid diapasons in order to deal with the vast room proportions of Liverpool Cathedral ? How many other organs have double languid stops other than Westminster Cathedral and Atlantic City ?   Antoni Scott  
(back) Subject: Re: Shocking Facts From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 15:19:38 -0600   Antoni Scott wrote:   > > How many other organs have double languid stops other than Westminster > Cathedral and Atlantic City ? >   Midmer-Losh, the builders of the Atlantic City organ, made quite extensive use of them in other instruments, including some relatively small ones. I recall we visited a three manual Midmer-Losh with a double-languid = diapason at the Roman Catholic Church of the Assumption, Ansonia, Connecticut, at the OHS 1994 Convention. Ernest M. Skinner was less than enamored to double-languid diapasons and suggested that they were "more suited to the baseball stadium" than the church.   John Speller        
(back) Subject: Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 16:35:46 EST   Dear Ross   Liverpool Cathedral indeed does have a sizeable Digital organ, and Ian Tracy just loves it! It was installed only recently. This isn't the first = one either. According to the artical and picture, it's used a lot for services. It = indeed fills the space with music also. Makin comes to mind. SORRY!   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: RE: Packer Chapel From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 16:33:27 -0600   There was a player organ in the Asa Packer estate home, and it played well as recently as summer 1996. I remember no other details.   Glenda Sutton            
(back) Subject: Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 17:56:05 EST   Dear Ross   I just found the add for the large digital in Liverpool Anglican = Cathedral.   September, 2001 It's a Phoenix, not a Makin as I first reported. Ian Tracy Commissioned the organ for the West end of the Cathedral. Page 23 TAO The American Organist. The console was reused from an older Makin? He is pictured happily playing this monster.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Shocking Facts From: "youngstown fireapp" <yfd4@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 23:17:20 +0000     The Wanamaker organ has a double-languid diapason in the Chorus Great division which is circa 1927? if memeory serves correctly and is called Chorus Diapason Magna 8 and was demonstrated for me during a performance when only myself and the store organist were in the console gallery....it was quite a large and impressive voice to say the least...Steve Bournias = in Warren Ohio   >From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Re: Shocking Facts >Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 15:19:38 -0600 > >Antoni Scott wrote: > > > > > How many other organs have double languid stops other than Westminster > > Cathedral and Atlantic City ? > > > >Midmer-Losh, the builders of the Atlantic City organ, made quite = extensive >use of them in other instruments, including some relatively small ones. = I >recall we visited a three manual Midmer-Losh with a double-languid = diapason >at the Roman Catholic Church of the Assumption, Ansonia, Connecticut, at >the OHS 1994 Convention. Ernest M. Skinner was less than enamored to >double-languid diapasons and suggested that they were "more suited to the >baseball stadium" than the church. > >John Speller > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     organ   _________________________________________________________________ Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com    
(back) Subject: A peaceful day in hell - Christmas 1A From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 17:25:32 -0600   First Sunday after Christmas, Year A St. Agatha's Episcopal Church DeFuniak Springs, Florida     Prelude: In dulci jubilo - Johann Michael Bach (1648 - 1694) What child is this (Greensleeves) - arr. Wilbur Held (b. 1914) Processional Hymn: Angels, from the realms of glory (Regent Square) - H 93 Gloria in excelsis (Powell) Sequence Hymn: The first nowell the angel did say (The first nowell) - H 109 Prayers of the People and Confession of Sin, Form VI Offertory Hymn: What child is this, who laid to rest (Greensleeves) - H 115 Eucharistic Prayer B Sanctus/Benedictus (Powell) Agnus Dei (Willan) Music during Communion: Once in royal David's city (Irby; text H 102) Go, tell it on the mountain (text H 99) Infant holy, infant holy (Polish Carol) Closing Hymn: Joy to the world (Antioch) - H 100 Postlude: Infant holy, infant lowly - Alexandre Guilmant (1837 - 1911)   Church was a calm affair today, and even with all the freezing weather this week, the organ sounded pretty good.   Furniture was delivered to my new office - chintzy stuff, the worst I've ever had. The government gets cheaper and cheaper. There was not even a center drawer on the desk - what the hell is a lawyer to do without a center drawer to hide the incriminating evidence and old Far Side cartoons?   I did not know this until a couple days after Christmas, but after the treasurer of the women's club had been appointed to order Christmas poinsettias, the head biddy went behind her back and ordered them from Wal-Mart. The treasurer had confided in me that she wanted to go to a florist and get large full fresh plants instead of the tacky little plants at Wal-Mart, and she did so. Well, Wal-Mart called her at 5:30 Christmas Eve wanting to know when she was picking up the poinsettias. She told them that she didn't order them, and had no intention of picking them up or paying for them. Good girl! I have no idea what the busybody did with twenty or so tacky poinsettia plants (I think the price tag was $120), but she hasn't been back to church to tell everyone how they're doing everything wrong! I guess someone else will sign up for head biddy after the holidays.   Christmas pictures have already been framed and are on the wall - damn, I'm good!   We entertained twice this week - once for family on Christmas Day, and Friday night for our neighbors. I feel like the Goodyear blimp, and the refrigerator is groaning with all the leftovers. And last night Rick and I just had to sample one of the bottles of wine given us by Jon Bertschinger - good stuff. There's still a cooler of beer on the back porch -it's been cool enough so that the ice has not melted. I feel like a redneck - anyone want a beer?   Happy New Year to all,   Glenda Sutton (reluctantly turning the corner toward Epiphany)          
(back) Subject: Re: Liverpool Shocking Facts From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 18:48:26 EST     --part1_23.16e9688b.296101ca_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/29/01 11:53:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:     > The planned-for sections of the original design are a long > discussion in and of themselves. >   Please enlighten us. This sounds very interesting. Any other = information on the organ would be most welcome.   Thanks.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_23.16e9688b.296101ca_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/29/01 11:53:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The planned-for = sections of the original design are a long <BR>discussion in and of themselves. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Please enlighten us. &nbsp;This sounds very interesting. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Any other information on the organ would be most welcome. <BR> <BR>Thanks. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi = &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_23.16e9688b.296101ca_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral prepared-for divisions From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 17:03:08 -0800   I don't have my books at hand, but there were at least two ... one division was completed in the Willis factory, but was destroyed by German bombers before it could be installed in the cathedral ... if my fading memory serves, that WAS to go in the West end of the cathedral .... or perhaps it was a division for the northwest quarter-gallery in the tower ... I can't find anything on the website that gives the planned-for divisions ... perhaps someone else can.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral prepared-for divisions From: "youngstown fireapp" <yfd4@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 01:26:03 +0000     There were also the Corona,Echo and I believe Central Space divisions...Steve Bournias...Warren, Ohio   >From: quilisma@socal.rr.com >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Liverpool Anglican Cathedral prepared-for divisions >Date: Sun, 30 Dec 2001 17:03:08 -0800 > >I don't have my books at hand, but there were at least two ... one >division was completed in the Willis factory, but was destroyed by >German bombers before it could be installed in the cathedral ... if my >fading memory serves, that WAS to go in the West end of the cathedral >... or perhaps it was a division for the northwest quarter-gallery in >the tower ... I can't find anything on the website that gives the >planned-for divisions ... perhaps someone else can. > >Cheers, > >Bud > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     w   _________________________________________________________________ Send and receive Hotmail on your mobile device: http://mobile.msn.com