PipeChat Digest #1821 - Monday, February 12, 2001
 
Re: 16' OW - 32' Bourdon
  by "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: Leather Coupler
  by "conmara" <conmara@grandcanyonhiker.com>
16' OW -- 32' Thunder
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Leather Coupler
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Leather Coupler Alternative
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
RE: 16' OW - 32' Bourdon
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Education, Degrees, Life, Music
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Education, Degrees, Life, Music
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
RE: Education, Degrees, Life, Music
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: Education, Degrees, Life, Music
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: Time management (was "Education Needed? Yep. Sure Is.")/  CHarterhous
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: 16' OW - 32' Bourdon
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Organ Building: an Art
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Vintage stops
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: Leather Coupler
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: 16' OW - 32' Bourdon From: "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Sun, 11 Feb 2001 22:30:45 -0500       On Sun, 11 Feb 2001 12:19:32 -0600 "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> writes: > > > > We have recently done this, I think very successfully, at Quimby > Pipe Organs. > We have been relocating the old Reuter organ from the University of > Kansas, > Lawrence to Corpus Christi Roman Catholic Church in Lawrence, and > are adding a > 32' Contra Bourdon.   Dear John,   I am puzzled. I looked at that organ when it was for sale and it had three 32' ranks on it. Why did you need to add another?     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY    
(back) Subject: Re: Leather Coupler From: "conmara" <conmara@grandcanyonhiker.com> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 07:56:23 -0600     Here's one possibility.   http://www.qualitypumpleather.com/         Sam Vause wrote: > > Hmmm... Perhaps it IS appropriate as long as everyone understands it = will > fail in a similarly short term. I agree with you that a more long-term > solution would be desirable. > --sam > Sam Vause (Chandler, AZ) > > -----Original Message----- > From: Jason Comet > Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2001 3:49 PM > Subject: Leather Coupler > > I had a problem yesterday with the blower. Turn it on and there was = only > enough wind for the 8' Open Diapason, then it sagged when there was a = full > chord played. > ... > I started the motor, then I noticed the coupling between the motor and = fan > shaft wasn't connected completely. > > That exact coupler was replaced 3 years ago by the same member of the > trustees. That was when the original LEATHER coupling went-up. He = replaced > it with a rubber coupling. > > Well, goes to show you WHY they used a LEATHER coupler instead of a = RUBBER > one.... The oil and other petro's in the grease/oil/etc... ate away at = the > rubber coupling. The leather one lasted from 1913-1998!!!!! > ... > He's going to replace the coupler AGAIN with a RUBBER one, which I don't > feel is appropriate, knowing the rubber/oil combination doesn't work. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   -- KenMc - conmara@grandcanyonhiker.com http://www.grandcanyonhiker.com See our new video - 'Hiking the Grand Canyon - The Corridor Trails'  
(back) Subject: 16' OW -- 32' Thunder From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 10:51:02 EST   Then if it's a smaller scaled 16' Open Wood than the one you have, what = about an independent, PURELY TUNED, open 10-2/3' Contraquint? It gives the = effect of a 32' Diapason, and is pretty magnificent compared to a chancy 32' = stopped flute. Sounds as good under a Flute Celeste as it does under full organ.   Sebastian  
(back) Subject: Re: Leather Coupler From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 10:56:03 EST   The leather or rubber coupling, if properly made and installed, is quite sturdy and long-lasting, while providing a slight buffer between the motor =   and the blower itself. Small variances, imbalances, and vibrations are attenuated by such a system. SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: Leather Coupler Alternative From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 10:59:25 EST   You might try to substitute the leather or rubber coupling with a grilled steak from a local truck stop diner. These are notorious for being incredibly tough and totally resistant to cutting. Once in place, they = will harden into the precise shape you want, and are practically = indesctructable...   SMG  
(back) Subject: RE: 16' OW - 32' Bourdon From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 10:24:34 -0600   John:   Was that the Reuter that competed with the Jayhawks in the basketball gym?   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: John L. Speller [mailto:jlspeller@mindspring.com] Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2001 12:20 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: 16' OW - 32' Bourdon     Jason Comet wrote:   > Is it acceptable to make a 16' Open Wood rank a 32' Bourdon? I know = this > have been talked about before, but I've got a few questions about = actually > going about doing it. > > Is it worth it? > > What kind of voicing work would have to be done? > > Don't you have to make the pipes a few inches longer? > > Thanks, and I'll look in the archives to see if there's anything I missed... > if I can find them! >   We have recently done this, I think very successfully, at Quimby Pipe Organs. We have been relocating the old Reuter organ from the University of = Kansas, Lawrence to Corpus Christi Roman Catholic Church in Lawrence, and are = adding a 32' Contra Bourdon. We have made the 32' Contra Bourdon from an Open = Wood, and it has resulted in a honey of a 32' that just purrs away in the bass. We did, however, make three new pipes in the bass for the three longest pipes C, = C# and D. With the old tuning slots and adding stoppers, the lowest pipe would only speak D# satisfactorily. It would have been possible to lengthen all the pipes, but this would have not have been as satisfactory a solution, especially = as adding the three additional pipes has enabled us to rescale the stop a little wider.   John Speller     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Education, Degrees, Life, Music From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 11:50:14 EST   The question of degrees has come up on other chat lists, although I am new = to pipechat and haven't really seen it surface here. It usually sparks a = bitter controversy, with condemnations of prejudice and snobbery against those = who have academic degrees, and a strong defense of those who manage to make wonderful music, while feeding, clothing, and housing themselves, without = any letters after their names.   We do, however, live in a society which is creating a widening gulf of disparity between those with education and those without; while organists =   have created their own organist shortage, and feel that they are in = demand, they are still very poorly paid, and must usually work a second career to make ends meet. Often, that career is not what they want to do as their life's work, but it does make life work.   I know several organists who make between 85,000 and 110,000 dollars per year, JUST being church musicians and teachers. What they all have in = common are the letters "DMA" after their names. This may be unfair, but draw = your own conclusions.   In defense of those who have no degrees, one can look at the likes of = Peter Jennings, ABC's distinguished and brilliantly insightful anchorman, who = was a high school dropout in Canada. Many people have made extraordinary contributions to mankind, civilization, and culture without a single = academic degree, but these were highly self-motivated people with their eyes on the =   goal, not the obstacles, and never went searching for excuses or factors = to blame.   I grew up the son of professors, on a university campus, and in my 22 = years of formal education, often wished that the last bit of SkyLab would = re-enter the atmosphere and strike the University at its epicenter. University = life is its own ivory tower, and one must venture beyond the ivy-covered walls = to find out about the real world, too. Likewise, church musicians are best = off interacting with non-musicians and non-organists, as well as getting a general education. And once the diplomas are handed out, and one "gets = over it" and takes them DOWN off the wall, one must STILL continue one's quest = for education. The minute we think we have learned all that we can, we have signed our intellectual and spiritual death warrant.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Education, Degrees, Life, Music From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 12:54:45 EST     --part1_3b.105471ee.27b97d65_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 2/12/2001 11:53:14 AM Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:     > And once the diplomas are handed out, and one "gets over > it" and takes them DOWN off the wall, one must STILL continue one's = quest > for > education. The minute we think we have learned all that we can, we have =   > signed our intellectual and spiritual death warrant.   Well, I for one, never put my diplomas on any wall, but with that, I nonetheless never "got over it." Little Malcolm went off to Oberlin in = 1953, moved into a kind of thrown together freshman dormitory, made for = returning soldiers from WWII studying on the G. I. Bill. It was aptly called Federal =   Hall. For the next four years, I was surrounded by the most remarkable assortment of students from all over the world, bringing to the mix an enormous variety of backgrounds and experience. Most were types I had = never met growing up in New England. Having studied piano somewhat seriously in = the years before university, at Oberlin, I discovered the organ, and = ultimately, after a couple of years of lessons as an Arts and Sciences student with Fenner Douglass, I migrated into the Conservatory. I could feel myself stretching intellectually day by day, through contact with a remarkable faculty. There is no question that the university presents a so-called = "ivory tower" existence, but what an exhilarating existence it is! I believe = that, rather than leaving you unprepared for the real world, it provides one = with an abundance of skills, tools, and experiences that stand one in good = stead whether, in church music terms, one is in a very small position, or = directing the music full time in one of the great churches. You may never directly = use those courses in species counterpoint or advanced orchestration, but the = fact that they are part of your experience informs everything you do, and, of course, I am just naming those two courses as representative of many more.   However, what I have said applies to me. I did not grow up in a church, around church music, or even a particularly artistically cultivated environment. I know others who have grown up around great music, including =   church music, have watched it being made, and heard it talked about, and = are totally comfortable and confident organizing, playing, planning, and directing, and doing so brilliantly. I know several amazing and effective players, conductors, and thinkers about music who have never darkened the door of a university. I know that my university experience was necessary = for me, and I cherish the memory.   I don't any longer know where the diplomas are!   Cheers,   Malcolm   --part1_3b.105471ee.27b97d65_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 2/12/2001 11:53:14 AM Eastern Standard Time, <BR>TubaMagna@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">And once the = diplomas are handed out, and one "gets over <BR>it" and takes them DOWN off the wall, one must STILL continue one's = quest <BR>for <BR>education. &nbsp;The minute we think we have learned all that we can, = we have <BR>signed our intellectual and spiritual death warrant.</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Well, I for one, never put my diplomas on any wall, but with that, I <BR>nonetheless never "got over it." Little Malcolm went off to Oberlin in = 1953, <BR>moved into a kind of thrown together freshman dormitory, made for = returning <BR>soldiers from WWII studying on the G. I. Bill. It was aptly called = Federal <BR>Hall. For the next four years, I was surrounded by the most remarkable <BR>assortment of students from all over the world, bringing to the mix an =   <BR>enormous variety of backgrounds and experience. Most were types I had = never <BR>met growing up in New England. Having studied piano somewhat seriously = in the <BR>years before university, at Oberlin, I discovered the organ, and = ultimately, <BR>after a couple of years of lessons as an Arts and Sciences student = with <BR>Fenner Douglass, I migrated into the Conservatory. I could feel myself =   <BR>stretching intellectually day by day, through contact with a = remarkable <BR>faculty. There is no question that the university presents a so-called = "ivory <BR>tower" existence, but what an exhilarating existence it is! I believe = that, <BR>rather than leaving you unprepared for the real world, it provides one = with <BR>an abundance of skills, tools, and experiences that stand one in good = stead <BR>whether, in church music terms, one is in a very small position, or = directing <BR>the music full time in one of the great churches. You may never = directly use <BR>those courses in species counterpoint or advanced orchestration, but = the fact <BR>that they are part of your experience informs everything you do, and, = of <BR>course, I am just naming those two courses as representative of many = more. <BR> <BR>However, what I have said applies to me. I did not grow up in a = church, <BR>around church music, or even a particularly artistically cultivated <BR>environment. I know others who have grown up around great music, = including <BR>church music, have watched it being made, and heard it talked about, = and are <BR>totally comfortable and confident organizing, playing, planning, and <BR>directing, and doing so brilliantly. I know several amazing and = effective <BR>players, conductors, and thinkers about music who have never darkened = the <BR>door of a university. I know that my university experience was = necessary for <BR>me, and I cherish the memory. <BR> <BR>I don't any longer know where the diplomas are! <BR> <BR>Cheers, <BR> <BR>Malcolm &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_3b.105471ee.27b97d65_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Education, Degrees, Life, Music From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 10:45:06 -0800   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0024_01C094E1.ED7082A0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I personally, have though about my own comments in a different light since Jason's posting about even the remotest possibility about not going to college.   It is very easy to say, well, look at me - I managed to make it, but when you have a young person take your comments seriously you realize what an impact anonymous words can have.   I do think in many ways, as a church organist-musician, I have abilities that make me better suited to that calling than some people that have advanced degrees. HOWEVER, if I didn't say it before, they (people I am thinking of) have a better command of a broad range of the organ's literature than I could ever hope to have, and generally the playing is accurate, at worst, and much of the time completely convincing and = engaging. And of course, having a degree does not *prevent* one from being a great church organist - in fact, the education only strenghtens one's basic = innate ability. Just in the last few years, I find myself thinking about theoritically possible avenues when improvising or modulating, or = analysing something without having to think to analyse it.   In my small hometown, I was surrounded by numerous people who, like me, = felt insecure about their abality. So when I went to the Peninsula AGO = chapter's annual picnic that first year and found out that they (Stanford graduates, etc.) were not the horrible snobs I thought they would be and I started playing, and was invited to be a board member, I realized that perhaps one should always give everyone a chance and try not to let preconceived = notions come into play without obvious confirmation that they were correct!   AND THAT, is what I guess I meant. I don't want to be discounted when someone stops at the education line on my resume, without reviewing the other information that confirms that I am a legitimate candidate. I don't apply for jobs that I can't do, at least musically! Likewise, nobody should look at a title and automatically think someone = will come in with nose held high.   As Sebastian so articulately stated, there are plenty of snobs on both = sides of the fence. I don't want anyone to think I am one of them!   Randy Terry   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0024_01C094E1.ED7082A0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1">     <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2614.3500" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D770353418-12022001>I=3D20 personally, have though about my own comments in a different light since = =3D Jason's=3D20 posting about even the remotest possibility about not going to=3D20 college.</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D770353418-12022001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D770353418-12022001>It is=3D20 very easy to say, well, look at me - I managed to make it, but when you = =3D have a=3D20 young person take your comments seriously you realize what an impact =3D anonymous=3D20 words can have.</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D770353418-12022001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D770353418-12022001>I do=3D20 think in many ways, as a church organist-musician, I have abilities that = =3D make me=3D20 better suited to that calling than some people that have advanced =3D degrees.&nbsp;=3D20 HOWEVER, if I didn't say it before, they (people I am thinking of) have = =3D a better=3D20 command of a broad range of the organ's literature than I could ever =3D hope to=3D20 have, and generally the playing is accurate, at worst, and much of the =3D time=3D20 completely convincing and engaging.&nbsp; And of course, having a degree = =3D does=3D20 not *prevent* one from being a great church organist - in fact, the =3D education=3D20 only strenghtens one's basic innate ability.&nbsp; Just in the last few = =3D years, I=3D20 find myself thinking about theoritically possible avenues when =3D improvising or=3D20 modulating, or analysing something without having to think to analyse=3D20 it.</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D770353418-12022001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D770353418-12022001>In my=3D20 small hometown, I was surrounded by numerous people who, like me, felt =3D insecure=3D20 about their abality.&nbsp; So when I went to the Peninsula AGO chapter's = =3D annual=3D20 picnic that first year and found out that they (Stanford graduates, =3D etc.) were=3D20 not the horrible snobs I thought they would be and I started playing, =3D and was=3D20 invited to be a board member, I realized that perhaps one should always = =3D give=3D20 everyone a chance and try not to let preconceived notions come into play = =3D without=3D20 obvious confirmation that they were correct!</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D770353418-12022001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D770353418-12022001>AND=3D20 THAT, is what I guess I meant.&nbsp; I don't want to be discounted when = =3D someone=3D20 stops at the education line on my resume, without reviewing the other=3D20 information that confirms that I am a legitimate candidate.&nbsp; I =3D don't apply=3D20 for jobs that I can't do, at least musically!</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D770353418-12022001>Likewise, nobody should look at a title = and=3D20 automatically think someone will come in with nose held high.&nbsp;=3D20 </SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D770353418-12022001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D770353418-12022001>As=3D20 Sebastian so articulately stated, there are plenty of snobs on both =3D sides of the=3D20 fence.&nbsp; I don't want anyone to think I am one of =3D them!</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D770353418-12022001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D770353418-12022001>Randy=3D20 Terry</SPAN></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0024_01C094E1.ED7082A0--    
(back) Subject: Re: Education, Degrees, Life, Music From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 14:33:44 EST   On the subject at hand,   Far too often students enter a college or university for the singular = purpose of obtaining the degree. Those who succeed through this tunnel-visioned approach have wasted one of life's greatest opportunities, that being personal development through interaction with their peers. The college regimen should hopefully aid in the development of a philosophy for life = and those who fail to exploit it to the fullest have shortchanged themselves.   In preparing for professional life, one should first learn the established =   conventions for that profession and lay a strategy for attaining those requirements. There is no doubt that some clerks are better lawyers than some lawyers but they can't practice the legal arts until the requirement = are satisfied. If one is preparing for a life in music either as a performer = or teacher, credentials will not distract but, more appropriately, contribute = to the perceived worth of the individual.   Within any profession one learns early on that the degree is more than an academic credential. It is a right of passage and, whether that good or = bad, it is reality. Until one is permitted to establish the professional standards by which we are adjudged, we are stuck with those currently in place. As in all cases, there are exceptions. I would not want to gamble = my professional future nor success on being one.   Sebastian Gluck stated that closing the door on learning is a death = warrant and I could not agree more. Life itself is a great university from which = we can learn more than in all the classrooms we well ever visit. The truly educated will have mastered this cardinal lesson and will grow intellectually, spiritually, and professionally each day. Let me hasten = to say that I spent twenty-plus years in the world of post-secondary academia =   and some of the most profoundly ignorant people I know have attained the Doctorate. The most brilliant person I know dropped out of high school in =   the tenth grade. But those are the exceptions alluded to earlier.   Here endeth the lesson!   Jim Pitts, B.S., M.Ed.  
(back) Subject: Re: Time management (was "Education Needed? Yep. Sure Is.")/ CHarterhouse, etc. From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 11:50:52 -0800   At 02:57 PM 2/10/2001 -0800, you wrote: >Back to the piano and Czerny in the meantime ...<snip>   Aha! The cause of "Czerny Tunnel Syndrome"! Him and trackers....   dB    
(back) Subject: Re: 16' OW - 32' Bourdon From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 12:23:46 -0800   At 01:08 PM 2/11/2001 -0500, you wrote: >Is it acceptable to make a 16' Open Wood rank a 32' Bourdon?<snip>   Your first problem is one of scale. Is the Open Wood of humongous scale? If not, you might wind up with a 32' stopped rank that puts out more third harmonic than fundamental.   >Is it worth it?<snip>   Beats paying for new pipework!   >Don't you have to make the pipes a few inches longer?<snip>   You'll need a few new pipes at the bottom of the compass and shift the = rest upward, I'm pretty sure, differences due to stopped versus open being what =   they are. You *could* build "extensions", possibly, but it would be a "Mickey Mouse" at best. If the Open Wood is of medium foundation scale, I'd say forget it.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Organ Building: an Art From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 15:42:35 -0500   Okay, okay. I'd like to know if there is a school here in the USA where = one can study organ building as there is in Germany--(yes, and probably elsewhere as those who will read this and want to jump in with some other country that has such a school). Thank you, Robert Colasacco   >  
(back) Subject: Vintage stops From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 12:46:31 -0800   I think that the 16' Open Woods and narrower Contrabass stops are = wonderful. I have seen a (builder unmentionable - a hack, passed into larger life) wonderful large scale open wood in a very large organ put together out of many old parts. This would make a nice 32' at least down to low F, when = the resultant becomes more successful. However, in this organ, low C Open = Wood was holding up the entire structure of the Great, Pedal, and Positiv. It was also ciphering so someone laid an open hymnal in the mouth.   When people call those stops tubby how "tubby" are they? I've played a number of organs with open woods, most of them, even from the 20's don't sound particularly "tubby" to me. Just very much a fundamental voice. I guess I think of tubby as being not only very foundational, but of being = so large and highly cut up as to be very slow in speaking, and I think in the large more contemporary organs, mostly e/p and very eclectic, I have = played, the Open Wood is almost necessary. The metal Principals are not big = enough even with a 32'. In the very recent instruments almost all of them have a Metal Principal or large Violone in addition to the open wood.    
(back) Subject: Re: Leather Coupler From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 13:12:19 -0800   At 05:48 PM 2/11/2001 -0500, you wrote: >At first test, by the remote switch with the blower, I thought it was the =   >brushes/bushes/whatever in the motor.<snip>   AC induction motors don't use brushes/bushes/whatever.   >The question: >Where can I get a LEATHER coupler for the Kinetic/Century Blower/Motor >unit???<snip>   C'mon, get smart. There are literally TONS of power coupling devices on the market that'd fit the bill here. Using leather is laughable.   He's going to replace the coupler AGAIN with a RUBBER one, which I don't feel is appropriate, knowing the rubber/oil combination doesn't = work.<snip>   Synthetic compounds which are rated for exposure to petroleum products and =   heat, such as Viton and other compounds, are readily available. You need to measure shaft sizes and configuration and see your local industrial bearing and/or motor dealer.   DeserTBoB