PipeChat Digest #1824 - Tuesday, February 13, 2001
 
Tuning the organ (xpost)
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Tuning the organ (xpost)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Tuning the organ (xpost)
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: ReTuning the organ 44?
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Tuning the organ (xpost)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Tuning the organ (xpost)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Harmonics and Partials
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: questions, questions
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Balcony Placements...
  by "Cylocke" <Cylocke@mediaone.net>
Re: questions, questions
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
RE: Balance  was Balcony Placements
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: Tuning the organ (xpost)
  by "Cylocke" <Cylocke@mediaone.net>
RE: balance - was Balcony Placements...
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: Tuning the organ (xpost)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
ACCHO website is awesome
  by "DanielW Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: Harmonics and Partials
  by <SProt82850@cs.com>
Re: HELP! Historic Organ is to be distroyed!
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: HELP! Historic Organ is to be distroyed!
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: ACCHO website is awesome
  by "randy terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
Re: ACCHO website is awesome
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
More Music for Sale!
  by "Peter Carlin" <pjc67@adelphia.net>
 

(back) Subject: Tuning the organ (xpost) From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 14:08:17 -0500   I've got some people who want to rent the church for a concert. And use = the organ with their orchestra. I said "Fine," but warned them that I've been told that the organ is tuned at 444 Hz.   They talked to their instrumentalists, who all promptly backed out of the deal.   So they've got to change to another venue.   Their contact with me says that she thinks our organ is probably NOT tuned to 444, but perhaps to 442. She's going to bring in a tuner tomorrow to "examine" it. By "tuner" I imagine she means an electronic machine that will measure the frequency. I'm welcoming that, because, though I can = tell that the organ is north of the piano which IS 440 (but we never use them together, so it makes no difference), I can't tell whether they're 2 Hz apart or 4, and I'm CURIOUS as to where the organ REALLY IS.   My questions for you:   How big a job (in person-hours) is it to re-tune from 444 to 440? Totally mechanical action, 23 ranks.   If we take it down to 440, does that necessitate extensive re-voicing and regulation?   Is it not true that there are American orchestras (especially in Los Angeles?) that use 442, 444, or 446 on a regular basis?   Is an oboist or a trumpeter really unable to shove that slide in far = enough to get 444?   Are tenors and sopranos REALLY handicapped at 444, or do they just like to act like prima/o don(na)s?   Thanks awfully.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning the organ (xpost) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 11:24:23 -0800   Alan - I think the problem comes if the organ is cone-tuned, and/or you = have Gedeckts or Rohrfloetes with soldered caps that are tuned on the ears. A cone-tuned rank MIGHT have to have tuning collars to be able to get it = down to 440 ... NOT a good idea. Also, it's likely that it would throw the reeds off-speech.   Cheers,   Bud, who much prefers the old 435 tuning anyway (grin)   Alan Freed wrote:   > I've got some people who want to rent the church for a concert. And use = the > organ with their orchestra. I said "Fine," but warned them that I've = been > told that the organ is tuned at 444 Hz. > > They talked to their instrumentalists, who all promptly backed out of = the > deal. > > So they've got to change to another venue. > > Their contact with me says that she thinks our organ is probably NOT = tuned > to 444, but perhaps to 442. She's going to bring in a tuner tomorrow to > "examine" it. By "tuner" I imagine she means an electronic machine that > will measure the frequency. I'm welcoming that, because, though I can = tell > that the organ is north of the piano which IS 440 (but we never use them > together, so it makes no difference), I can't tell whether they're 2 Hz > apart or 4, and I'm CURIOUS as to where the organ REALLY IS. > > My questions for you: > > How big a job (in person-hours) is it to re-tune from 444 to 440? = Totally > mechanical action, 23 ranks. > > If we take it down to 440, does that necessitate extensive re-voicing = and > regulation? > > Is it not true that there are American orchestras (especially in Los > Angeles?) that use 442, 444, or 446 on a regular basis? > > Is an oboist or a trumpeter really unable to shove that slide in far = enough > to get 444? > > Are tenors and sopranos REALLY handicapped at 444, or do they just like = to > act like prima/o don(na)s? > > Thanks awfully. > > Alan > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning the organ (xpost) From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 14:35:15 EST   Are tenors and sopranos REALLY handicapped at 444, or do they just like to act like prima/o don(na)s?   I think they are generally considered to be challenged whenever and = wherever they might find themselves.  
(back) Subject: Re: ReTuning the organ 44? From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 15:39:42 EST   Dear Sir:   If you do not presently have a curator and tuner for the instrument, my = own firm can examine the instrument for you, see what its original pitch and temperament were. This will naturally vary with the way the church is heated, and who has been caring (or not caring) for it in the past. There = is no reason that the organ should have been built at 444 -- last person to = do this was Koussevitzky at Boston, which caused ALL kinds of problems, but that's another story, over coffee some day.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck (212) 979-7698  
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning the organ (xpost) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 17:25:45 EST   Hi DudelK:   Is 444Hz a detriment to singers? It just may be too high a pitch for a choir or a congregation to sing with an organ without transposing everything at the organ down a half step. The only reason organs are tuned at 444 is to accomodate orchestral players who do seem to be prima donas. There was no standard during Bach or Handel's time for pitching instruments like the organ, but 430 was usually acceptable. The upward creep of pitching Pipe organs was 435 a century or so ago and now you want 444. The voice of the avaerage singer is dropping in pitch. People are larger in height and other ways, and vocal chords are slightly larger, therefore the pitch drop. I really don't understand the wisdom behind this craze of raising the pitch. As people age their pitch drops slightly also. Why put the instrument out of reach of the singers, and call them Prima Dona's   I don't get it at all,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning the organ (xpost) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 15:28:53 -0800   I transpose virtually EVERYTHING down a half or a whole step for just that reason ... we sing mostly 19th century music that was WRITTEN for 430 or = 435 at most. I've often said that MIGHT be the explanation for the high "f's" and high "g's" in the Episcopal Hymnal 1940 ... when it came out, most of the pre-war organs (and there WEREN'T any post-war ones until the = factories retooled from making war materials ... Moller made bomb-sights, as I = recall) still had the lower, older pitch.   AND you're also right about there being more altos and basses than = sopranos and tenors ... my congregation has a working range of middle C to C the octave above, when they're REALLY fired up (grin). OTOH, they CAN manage = low B flats and A flats with no trouble.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Harmonics and Partials From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 13 Feb 2001 15:52:22 -0800   > Are tenors and sopranos REALLY handicapped at 444, or do they just like = to > act like prima/o don(na)s?   Yes.   Anyway, I keep reading about stopped flues producing odd harmonics. = Please straighten me out if I'm wrong:   1. Harmonics do not include the fundamental. The first harmonic is the = octave, and the second is the twelfth.   2. Partials start from the fundamental. The second partial is the = octave, and the third is the twelfth.   3. Stopped flues produce a lot of odd partials, including the fundamental = and the twelfth.   4. Stopped flues produce the fundamental and a lot of even harmonics, = including the twelfth.   And while I'm on the subject of terminological disorientation, don't the = terms "quint" and "quintadena" suggest "fifteenth"?   Dick      
(back) Subject: Re: questions, questions From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 20:00:39 EST   In a message dated 2/13/01 12:17:30 PM Central Standard Time, dillardm@airmail.net writes:   << First "Richard de Castre's Prayer to Jesus" - has the spelling "Jhesu" - Is the initial consonant Y as in Latin, or J as in English? And is the e as in Latin or long e as in English Jesus? >>   I instruct my choir to sing it as such "Yayzu". It's a beautiful anthem = is it not? And to keep this inline with pipechat... BE SURE to use the swell pedal, especially during the reed solo passages, as such: pp - p - mf - f - ff - = ff (by the end of the solo passages). It's effective and will bring tears to =   the eyes and money to the plate!   <<Then we have "Song of the Passion" by George Oldroyd (When I think on Jesu's blood) - which contains "Jesu", "Christis", and "Jesu Christ". We have tried various Latin and English pronunciations and they all sound odd.>>   Not familiar with that piece... but I do like George Oldroyd's organ music = in general and his setting of the liturgy... gotta get it! I'd go with = "Yayzu, Kristuus" and "Yayzu Christ".   Best of ruck!   John A. Gambill, Jr. Organist/Choirmaster Oak Cliff Lutheran Church (where things are happening to update/repair the = 40 yr old McManis!) Dallas, TX  
(back) Subject: Re: Balcony Placements... From: "Cylocke" <Cylocke@mediaone.net> Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2001 20:14:33 -0500   Randy.   The idea of moving the Choir and the Console to the main floor and having the pipework remain in the gallery poses two possible problems.   First, the choir and console under the pipework poses balancing problems between organ and choir. I have serviced and played severl instruments = set up in this format and found that hearing the balance between choir and organ, as well as organ and congregation. Basically you will have a wall = of wood between you and the pipework.   Just food for thought.   Regards Alan E. Carrick -----Original Message----- From: randy terry <randyterryus@yahoo.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, February 13, 2001 10:52 AM Subject: Re: Balcony Placements...     > >--- VEAGUE <dutchorgan@svs.net> wrote: >> St. Mary's RC church in Farmington, NM had the 2 manual Kilgen console down >> by the altar and the choir/pipes in the balcony in back. > >St. Peters currently has the organ in a gallery chamber. The choir and console >are upstairs. I have always fought for the gallery placememnt over the chancel >because of the musical and logistical (choir/organist doesn't disturb the >service) merits. > >Now, there are a handful of people who have voices and want to sing, but can't >climb the many steps going up and down several times each service. In = this >church, you also feel extremely removed from the congregation when upstairs. > >I am trying very hard to move the choir and console to the main floor at the >back of the nave under the pipes. I propose data ports upstairs and downstairs >to allow the restoration of the original set-up should that ever be desirable. > >Any ideas?? > >=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D >Randy Terry >Minister of Muisc, Organist & Choirmaster >The Episcopal Church of St. Peter >Redwood City, California > >__________________________________________________ >Do You Yahoo!? >Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail - only $35 >a year! http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/ > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: questions, questions From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 20:23:34 -0500   I have the organ score for the 7 last words. It's written on 3 staves (manuals & pedals), and it includes registration indications. It's = published by Schirmer, and is dated 1959. The organ score is by Norris L. Stephens. = I use it every year, and it's wonderful. I also have the piano = transcription, and it CAN be adapted for the organ, if you know HOW to do it......   Carlo    
(back) Subject: RE: Balance was Balcony Placements From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 17:21:15 -0800       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Cylocke Sent: Tuesday, March 13, 2001 5:15 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Balcony Placements...     Randy.   The idea of moving the Choir and the Console to the main floor and having the pipework remain in the gallery poses two possible problems.   First, the choir and console under the pipework poses balancing problems between organ and choir. I have serviced and played severl instruments = set up in this format and found that hearing the balance between choir and organ, as well as organ and congregation. Basically you will have a wall = of wood between you and the pipework.   Just food for thought.   Regards Alan E. Carrick -----Original Message----- From: randy terry <randyterryus@yahoo.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, February 13, 2001 10:52 AM Subject: Re: Balcony Placements...     > >--- VEAGUE <dutchorgan@svs.net> wrote: >> St. Mary's RC church in Farmington, NM had the 2 manual Kilgen console down >> by the altar and the choir/pipes in the balcony in back. > >St. Peters currently has the organ in a gallery chamber. The choir and console >are upstairs. I have always fought for the gallery placememnt over the chancel >because of the musical and logistical (choir/organist doesn't disturb the >service) merits. > >Now, there are a handful of people who have voices and want to sing, but can't >climb the many steps going up and down several times each service. In = this >church, you also feel extremely removed from the congregation when upstairs. > >I am trying very hard to move the choir and console to the main floor at the >back of the nave under the pipes. I propose data ports upstairs and downstairs >to allow the restoration of the original set-up should that ever be desirable. > >Any ideas?? > >=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D >Randy Terry >Minister of Muisc, Organist & Choirmaster >The Episcopal Church of St. Peter >Redwood City, California > >__________________________________________________ >Do You Yahoo!? >Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail - only $35 >a year! http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/ > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning the organ (xpost) From: "Cylocke" <Cylocke@mediaone.net> Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2001 20:29:10 -0500   Your questions pose more quuestions:   1) At what temperature wass the pitch taken. Pitch rises 2 beats per = second for every 5 degrees   2) is the organ slide tunes, cond tunes, scroll tuned?   In lowering the pitch of an organ, you may have to rescale pipes in order for them to sound best. For example. a skinny, bearded "pencil string" = may have to be rescaled one or two pipes, the orignal C becoming C# and adding = a new C pipe. Reeds will take quite a bit of work for them to be happy at = a new pitch. That is the subject of an entire book! "Reeds know when your having a bad day." Slotted strings may have to have their scrolls soldered up and recut. Cone tuned pipes will pose a whole set of different problens.   Some tuners merely knock the slide tuner "up" untill the new pitch is attained. However, a lot of tuner above the pipe causes leakage and a = pipe that will not do well.   Repitching an organ is more than just retuning to a new pitch. It basically is a whole tuning and revoicing process.   Good luck!   Alan Carrick   -----Original Message----- From: Alan Freed <afreed0904@earthlink.net> To: organchat <organchat@egroups.com>; PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, February 13, 2001 2:14 PM Subject: Tuning the organ (xpost)     >I've got some people who want to rent the church for a concert. And use the >organ with their orchestra. I said "Fine," but warned them that I've = been >told that the organ is tuned at 444 Hz. > >They talked to their instrumentalists, who all promptly backed out of the >deal. > >So they've got to change to another venue. > >Their contact with me says that she thinks our organ is probably NOT = tuned >to 444, but perhaps to 442. She's going to bring in a tuner tomorrow to >"examine" it. By "tuner" I imagine she means an electronic machine that >will measure the frequency. I'm welcoming that, because, though I can = tell >that the organ is north of the piano which IS 440 (but we never use them >together, so it makes no difference), I can't tell whether they're 2 Hz >apart or 4, and I'm CURIOUS as to where the organ REALLY IS. > >My questions for you: > >How big a job (in person-hours) is it to re-tune from 444 to 440? = Totally >mechanical action, 23 ranks. > >If we take it down to 440, does that necessitate extensive re-voicing and >regulation? > >Is it not true that there are American orchestras (especially in Los >Angeles?) that use 442, 444, or 446 on a regular basis? > >Is an oboist or a trumpeter really unable to shove that slide in far = enough >to get 444? > >Are tenors and sopranos REALLY handicapped at 444, or do they just like = to >act like prima/o don(na)s? > >Thanks awfully. > >Alan > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: RE: balance - was Balcony Placements... From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 17:25:41 -0800       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of   First, the choir and console under the pipework poses balancing problems between organ and choir. I have serviced and played severl instruments = set up in this format and found that hearing the balance between choir and organ, as well as organ and congregation. Basically you will have a wall = of wood between you and the pipework. ***************   In our current set up the choir is stuck in a actual hole in the back = wall, with the pipes in a chamber to the right looking at the liturgical west wall, and the Great is actually as far aout as the console. There is a 3' by 1-1/2' section of "choir" shutters, but they do nothing except lend a little presence. I just have to hope the registration is OK, and go on my memories of what I have heard done! It couldn't be any worse than it is now, except that the sound of the choir does not bloom as much on the main floor.    
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning the organ (xpost) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 17:38:55 -0800   At 02:08 PM 2/13/2001 -0500, Mr. Rock 'n Roll wrote: >Their contact with me says that she thinks our organ is probably NOT = tuned >to 444, but perhaps to 442. She's going to bring in a tuner tomorrow to >"examine" it. By "tuner" I imagine she means an electronic machine that >will measure the frequency.<snip>   That's called a "frequency counter".   > I'm welcoming that, because, though I can tell that the organ is north > of the piano which IS 440 (but we never use them >together, so it makes no difference), I can't tell whether they're 2 Hz >apart or 4, and I'm CURIOUS as to where the organ REALLY IS.<snip>   C'mon now...use your head! Play the 4' principal at any note, preferably A, and play the piano and octave above and count the beats. Amount of beats per second =3D amount of Hz the organ is "north" of the piano. = Count for 30 seconds, then divide the amount of beats by 30. Of course, there's =   no guarantee that your piano IS truly at A=3D440 without a freq counter = (or a good fork at the right temperature), so perhaps having the tuner come in will at least get you some quantification.   How big a job (in person-hours) is it to re-tune from 444 to 440? Totally =   mechanical action, 23 ranks.<snip>   A heavy two day's work minimum, four "man-days", considering that most one-day "tuning jobs" are just fudging the reeds to match the flues and knocking about a few renegade flues. Add another half day to bring some new "rogues" into line that will invariably slip within the first week or = two.   >If we take it down to 440, does that necessitate extensive re-voicing and =   >regulation?<snip>   Well, the words "mechanical action" give me pause, as it's probably voiced =   on very low wind with typical coarse, "retro-fad" voicing. Such lightly winded work may not speak properly in the upper registers if "lengthened" too much, but a change of 4 Hz at A shouldn't hurt them. More modern organs wouldn't have this problem. You MAY run out of slide or pipe body length in the lower registers. I've seen this happen when trying to get older organs built to 435 up to 440, only the other way around...slides wind up uncovering the pipe body at the top. Stopped woods, no problem. Capped or "rohred" metals, could be a problem. An area of real concern is the reeds, which may tend to "fly off" if full-length = resonators aren't lengthened properly. Half-length and regals? All bets are off! = Of course, if this organ's cone tuned, you're screwed.   >Is it not true that there are American orchestras (especially in Los >Angeles?) that use 442, 444, or 446 on a regular basis?<snip>   The trend has been to "fudge" upward in pitch, thinking that the increased =   pitch will add "sparkle" to the music, a strange idea indeed. Even if = most orchestras tune up initially to 440, they'll "blow up" to at least 442 during the course of the performance anyway, as members of each section will keep trying to "best" each other while tuning "on the fly". Poor adherence to Standard Concert Pitch is a disservice, if anything.   >Are tenors and sopranos REALLY handicapped at 444, or do they just like = to >act like prima/o don(na)s?<snip>   A truly capable soloist could go up and down a few cents, even with = perfect pitch, without too much problem. A prima dona with perfect pitch will = moan and groan all the time. ANY singer with just good relative pitch won't know the difference.   Just what builder builds to A =3D 444, anyway? Is this yet another = example of "retro-faddishness"?   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: ACCHO website is awesome From: "DanielW Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 22:00:11 -0400   I have been surfing the web tonight ,ANd I decided I would go into the = ACCHO website THe site is worth going into, It is very impressive,Anybody who hasnt = gone to it in a while should check it out Its Awesome Danielwh '2000' E. Power Biggs Fellow    
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonics and Partials From: <SProt82850@cs.com> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 21:02:51 EST   In a message dated 2/13/01 3:52:55 PM Pacific Standard Time, support@opensystemsorgans.com writes:   << And while I'm on the subject of terminological disorientation, don't = the terms "quint" and "quintadena" suggest "fifteenth"? >>   No, quint means five, or fifth.   Steven  
(back) Subject: Re: HELP! Historic Organ is to be distroyed! From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 21:12:11 EST       For those of you who aren't on the other list here is something alarming = that came up. I hope that this organ can be saved.   Alan B   In a message dated 2/13/01 12:24:05 PM Eastern Standard Time, TheOrganst@aol.com writes:   << Roosevelt Memorial Park in Gardena CA. is the home of the world famous 4/17 outdoor Wurlitzer Pipe Organ. I have been the organist and curator for several years now and just received a phone call from the board of = directors that they are seriously considering the destruction of the organ and = organ building to make room for Mausoleum space. The organ has been, for all practical purposes, unplayable for many years. I've kept it running and = in a choice restorable/rebuildable condition. This organ had a listening = radius of at least 5 miles. I need HELP. They are interested in = restoring/rebuiliding but they do not have the funds to do so. The cemetery is a not-for-profit =   entity and there is a special Wurlitzer Organ Fund already established thanks to me. I do not know how much time I have to come up with ideas so I'm asking for any and all ideas or contributions. We as organist's, CANNOT allow them to destroy or sell this once glorious =   instrument. Installation of this organ in any other location other than outdoors would be unsuccessful. It should stay where it was originally designed and intended. Please visit my website and see for yourself the wonderful history and story of this magnificent organ. This is NOT a = theater organ by nature but more a concert organ by design even though the specs = are semi theatrical. Please do not contact the park directly. All questions and suggestions = need to come to me. I await your help and suggestions. Please, no smart ass retorts. I = haven't got the time nor the desire to hear from anti Wurlitzer snobs. Kyle B. Irwin Organist-Curator http://members.aol.com/theorganst/Page1.html#Roosevelt Memorial Park >>  
(back) Subject: Re: HELP! Historic Organ is to be distroyed! From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 21:13:23 EST   Oops! Sorry that was'n ment to be copied to this list.  
(back) Subject: Re: ACCHO website is awesome From: "randy terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 18:32:54 -0800 (PST)     What is the ACCHO? How do I get to their webpages if I don't know what it = is??   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Randy Terry Minister of Muisc, Organist & Choirmaster The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail - only $35 a year! http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: ACCHO website is awesome From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 21:38:43 -0500       randy terry wrote: > > What is the ACCHO? How do I get to their webpages if I don't know what = it is?? >   http://www.acchos.org/ The organ there is somewhat larger than usual.   Stan :-)  
(back) Subject: More Music for Sale! From: "Peter Carlin" <pjc67@adelphia.net> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2001 21:50:41 -0500   The "Mad Library Weeder" has struck again! The list of music I have for sale has been edited and expanded once more. Most of the choral music has been sold, but there have been new titles added to the piano/harpsichord, organ and small ensemble lists. There's a few books for sale as well. To get a copy, send an e-mail to PJC67@adelphia.net and I'll reply with a copy. So, have a look (or another, if you already saw the other lists). You might just be able to fill a gap or two in your collection. Please circulate the list to friends, colleagues and students, and even = your friendly neighborhood music librarian! The sale is open to anyone.   Thanks and best,   --Peter Carlin