PipeChat Digest #1738 - Monday, January 1, 2001
 
year
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
January 1st
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
RE: "A Pipe Organ Worthy of Joyous Sounds" - NY Times, Dec 24, 2000
  by "Anthony" <anthonym@bestweb.net>
Re: Happy New Year
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Responsorial Psalms with Organ
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
translation, please
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
HAPPY NEW YEAR
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: translation, please
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
electric-action Odell organs (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: HAPPY NEW YEAR
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: translation, please
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: translation, please
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
GO Translator
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: translation, please
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Cochereau's Toccata:  "Marche des Rois"
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: GO Translator
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Cinema organs (Barton)
  by <Tspiggle@aol.com>
Re: GO Translator
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: HAPPY NEW YEAR
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: HAPPY NEW YEAR
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@home.com>
Re: electric-action Odell organs (X-posted)
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: translation, please
  by "Colin Hulme" <colin_hulme@lineone.net>
RE: "A Pipe Organ Worthy of Joyous Sounds" - NY Times, Dec 24, 20	00
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: recital advice
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Cinema organs (Barton)
  by "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net>
Re: CAD Programs X-post
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: abbreviated music list
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: abbreviated music list
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
RE: Cinema Organs (Barton)
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re:  Cochereau's Toccata:  "Marche des Rois"
  by "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com>
 

(back) Subject: year From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 06:25:07 -0500   Happy 01.01.01. +ACE- Looks ominous, don't it ?+ACE-   Rick      
(back) Subject: January 1st From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 07:51:04 -0500   for those of you whose churches celebrate the feast of Mary, the Mother of God today, like the Roman Catholics, remember that Marian hymns may be = used, but we're still in the Christmas season. Also, if your church is going to sing any Marian hymns, don't forget the golden rule: never sing/play anything to Mary at communion. Why??? Simple. You're receiving Jesus, so don't sing to his mother <G>.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: RE: "A Pipe Organ Worthy of Joyous Sounds" - NY Times, Dec 24, 2000 From: "Anthony" <anthonym@bestweb.net> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 08:02:37 -0500   >> Martin Pasi, at work in the sanctuary of the Bedford Presbyterian = Church, >> was installing the organ he had built the old-fashioned way -- by hand.     >Which Bedford? NY or NJ? (They would both be served by the NY Times)   Bedford, NY    
(back) Subject: Re: Happy New Year From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 09:04:09 EST     --part1_3a.ee28621.2781e859_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/31/2000 8:31:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, organist@total.net writes:     > My postlude this evening was a toccata on "Auld Lang Syne", played in = the > french romantic style, with the melody in the pedals. I made it up as I > went, and everyone thought it was great.   Interesting! Malcolm Archer was with us on New Year's Eve about a decade = ago when he was still at Bristol, and he gave us a fine recital, the encore to =   which was the Finale of the Vierne 1st, BUT with Auld Lang Syne in the = pedal instead of Vierne's pedal theme. There were some necessary adjustments in = the manual parts, but surprisingly few.   Malcolm - waiting for the Ball to drop in about 45 minutes.   --part1_3a.ee28621.2781e859_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 12/31/2000 8:31:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, = <BR>organist@total.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">My postlude this = evening was a toccata on "Auld Lang Syne", played in the <BR>french romantic style, with the melody in the pedals. I made it up as = I <BR>went, and everyone thought it was great. </FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Interesting! Malcolm Archer was with us on New Year's Eve about a = decade ago <BR>when he was still at Bristol, and he gave us a fine = recital, the encore to <BR>which was the Finale of the Vierne 1st, BUT = with Auld Lang Syne in the pedal <BR>instead of Vierne's pedal theme. = There were some necessary adjustments in the <BR>manual parts, but = surprisingly few. <BR> <BR>Malcolm - waiting for the Ball to drop in about 45 = minutes.</FONT></HTML>   --part1_3a.ee28621.2781e859_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Responsorial Psalms with Organ From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 09:49:22 -0600   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > After three years of writing it out in full for the CHOIR, I think they > could probably do it NOW from just the pointing. I think trying to teac= h > choirs to read pointing and sing in harmony is probably what killed off > singing the Psalter in this country in Anglican churches (grin). I also > started out writing out the tunes in full for each verse for the > congregation, but ALSO including the pointing so they associated the > notes with the marks; then gradually I weaned them away from it; I coul= d > probably do the same with the choir, but we don't have the rehearsal > time and I DO have the time to write them out, so I do.   Our church, St. Mark's Episcopal in St. Louis (after various unsuccessful attempts at plainsong, simplified Anglican chant, etc.) has been using Anglican chant for several years. We appear to be the only church in our diocese that does this successfully with the congregation, as opposed to just a choir solo. We print the chant and pointing in the service bulletin, so the congregation as well as the choir can follow it. We do our own speech rhythm pointing, a line for the bar lines (|), a dot (=95) where there are more than two syllables in a bar and bold typ= e to indicate two notes sung on the same syllable. At one point we were using the Alec Wyton *Anglican Chant Psalter* but abandoned it a couple years ago. The congregation seems to find the brackets drawn above the words to indicate where more than one syllable is sung on a note confusing, and are completely thrown when the reciting note is omitted, which we never do. We also think our own way of doing speech rhythm is more flowing and easier to grasp. We generally use the same chant for several weeks so that the congregation gets to know it. Thus we have a chant for Advent, another for Christmas and Epiphany, another for Lent, etc. We tend to use Victorian chants (Barnby, Turle, Havergal, etc.), rather than ones by more recent composers, partly because they are in the public domain, but also because they have more melodic interest and easier intervals, so that a congregation can latch onto them and sing them easily. Howells's music, for example, is wonderful, but it is more texture than melody, and is not always therefore easy for a congregation to sing. At our church the choir sings in harmony and the congregation in unison. For several months we have been trying the further experiment of singing the psalm antiphonally by having the choir sing one verse and the congregation the next. (Curiously enough, this was something that T. Tertius Noble recommended in the Hymnal of 1916.) This not only revives a traditional antiphonal way of reciting the psalms, but listening to the choir every other verse keeps the congregation concentrated and helps them to get the idea. We find that in our church the congregational singing of the psalms is as good as or better than the singing of the hymns, particularly in the case of unfamiliar hymns.=20 We are a small church with 200 members, but are helped by having a good small Aeolian-Skinner pipe organ and the best acoustics in town.=20   John Speller  
(back) Subject: translation, please From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 13:06:49 -0500   Can someone translate "Zeuch ein zu deinen Toren" for me? It's a chorale prelude by J. L. Krebs. Does someone know of a web site with English translations of German = chorale tunes?   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: HAPPY NEW YEAR From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 12:30:00 -0600   Folks,   I just want to wish all of our friends on the list a very Happy New Year. I also want to take this moment to remind everyone that the usual PipeChat IRC gathering will will happen tonight beginning at 9:00 PM EASTERN. I hope to see some of the regulars there and maybe even a few new people.   For information about how to connect to IRC please go to: http://www.pipechat.org/irc.html   Happy PipeChatting   David and Tim Co-Administrators -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: translation, please From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 10:31:32 -0800   GO Translator returned "Zeuch too your gates" (grin), so I suspect it's something like "Lift Up Your Gates."   Cheers,   Bud   Randolph Runyon wrote:   > Can someone translate "Zeuch ein zu deinen Toren" for me? It's a = chorale > prelude by J. L. Krebs. > Does someone know of a web site with English translations of German = chorale > tunes? > > Randy Runyon > organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati > runyonr@muohio.edu > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: electric-action Odell organs (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 10:35:23 -0800   Anybody have any thoughts/opinions/warnings about electric-action Odells?   I played one in a Presbyterian Church in Greenwich Village years ago ... the tone was superb, but the action had been cobbled (possible later electrocution by someone else?).   The one on TO classifieds is evidently all original.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: HAPPY NEW YEAR From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 10:37:35 -0800   My friend Britt Wheeler at Yale reminded me of my take on New Year's Day years ago:   "January 1st -- the one day of the year when all faithful Catholics are obliged to take two aspirins and hear Mass." (grin)   Cheers,   Bud   Administrator wrote:   > Folks, > > I just want to wish all of our friends on the list a very Happy New > Year. I also want to take this moment to remind everyone that the > usual PipeChat IRC gathering will will happen tonight beginning at > 9:00 PM EASTERN. I hope to see some of the regulars there and maybe > even a few new people. > > For information about how to connect to IRC please go to: > http://www.pipechat.org/irc.html > > Happy PipeChatting > > David and Tim > Co-Administrators > -- > **************************************** > David Scribner > Owner / Co-Administrator > PipeChat > > http://www.pipechat.org > mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: translation, please From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 13:39:49 -0500   >GO Translator returned "Zeuch too your gates" (grin), so I suspect it's >something like "Lift Up Your Gates." > >Cheers, > >Bud   Thanks, Bud, but I subsequently found (by typing the German title into Dogpile) a site at http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/wittenberg/hymns/enter.txt , which translates the entire text of Paul Gerhardt's hymn, whose title is "Oh, enter, Lord, Thy temple."   Just goes to show what those automatic translators are worth, huh? You be amused to see what I sometimes get from my less-gifted French students who try to use them to write their papers.   Bonne ann=E9e,   Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu Professor of French Miami University (Oxford, OH)      
(back) Subject: Re: translation, please From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 13:49:54 -0500   Randy:   First stanza is=20 Zeuch ein zu meinen Toren Sei meines Herzens Gast, Der du, da ich geboren, Mich neugeboren hast. O hochgeliebter Geist Des Vater und des Sohnes, Mit beiden gleichen Thrones Mit beiden gleich gepreist!   Catherine Winkworth translated it for her Chorale Book for England in 1863. That translation, slightly altered, appeared in the LCMS 1941 book as   Oh, enter, Lord, thy temple. Be thou my spirit's Guest, Who savest me, the earth-born, A second birth more blest. Thou in the Godhead, Lord, Though here to dwell thou deignest, Forever equal reignest, Art equally adored.   The tune was written for this text by Johann Cr=FCger, published at least twice in the 1650s.   Alan (from whom more details on requst).   > From: runyonr@muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 13:06:49 -0500 > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: translation, please >=20 > Can someone translate "Zeuch ein zu deinen Toren" for me? It's a chorale > prelude by J. L. Krebs. > Does someone know of a web site with English translations of German chora= le > tunes? >=20 > Randy Runyon > organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati > runyonr@muohio.edu >=20 >=20 >=20 > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >=20 >=20    
(back) Subject: GO Translator From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 11:05:15 -0800   When I first discovered GO Translator, I put in the Collect For Purity and asked it to translate it into Spanish, since I pretty much know it in Spanish. It went along pretty well until it got to "Holy WHISKEY", which it had translated for "Spirit" (grin).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: translation, please From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 14:10:05 -0500     >Catherine Winkworth translated it for her Chorale Book for England in 1863. >That translation, slightly altered, appeared in the LCMS 1941 book as > >Oh, enter, Lord, thy temple. >Be thou my spirit's Guest, >Who savest me, the earth-born, >A second birth more blest. >Thou in the Godhead, Lord, >Though here to dwell thou deignest, >Forever equal reignest, >Art equally adored. > >The tune was written for this text by Johann Cr=FCger, published at least >twice in the 1650s. > >Alan (from whom more details on requst).   Vielen dank, lieber Freund!   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Cochereau's Toccata: "Marche des Rois" From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 14:29:53 -0500   Can someone tell me if the theme in Pierre Cochereau's Toccata on the "Marche des Rois", which also appears in Bizet's "L'Arlesienne" suite, is = a traditional folktune? Or was it composed by Bizet?   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: GO Translator From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 14:32:27 -0500   ....It went along pretty well until it got to "Holy WHISKEY", >which it had translated for "Spirit" (grin). > >Cheers, > >Bud > Love it!   Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu Professor of French Miami University (Oxford, OH)      
(back) Subject: Re: Cinema organs (Barton) From: <Tspiggle@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 15:02:34 EST   You obviously don't have a copy of Dave Junchen's "Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ". According to his evaluation, Marr & Coltons were = of such poor quality, they wouldn't even be on the list. He doesn't have much =   good to say about them.   Tom  
(back) Subject: Re: GO Translator From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 15:38:35 -0500   Bud:   A few years ago I sponsored a recital at an Episcopal church. Having served as choir director at St. Christopher's Anglican/Episcopal in Franfurt, Germany where Sherry was served at coffee hour, I asked if this stateside church might permit me to offer champagne.   Came the answer, "Eell you know what they say about Episcopalians...whenever two or three are gathered together...there's a = fifth."   Great reception, average concert. Europeans do have such a hard time adjusting to our questionable acoustical enviroments, eh!   Noel Jones, aago moderator, rodgersorgan@egroups.com International Users Group, members from 8 countries.  
(back) Subject: Re: HAPPY NEW YEAR From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 15:46:40 EST   Dear Pipechatters:   Happy New Year, again. Some of us get to celebrate twice each year. We just have to keep track of which planet we follow. Or what planet we're on.   SMG 2001/5761  
(back) Subject: Re: HAPPY NEW YEAR From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@home.com> Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 14:55:54 -0600   A very happy 2001 to all my fellow listmembers and organ enthusiasts! May all good things be yours in the new year.   Russ Greene St. Andrew's Anglican (Woodhaven) Winnipeg, Canada    
(back) Subject: Re: electric-action Odell organs (X-posted) From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 16:04:11 EST   Odell organs from the late 1890s were really tonally superb, especially = when they had the opportunity to develop full diapason choruses and were in acoustically fine rooms. Notable Doppelflotes, Harmonic Flutes, and Great =   Viola da Gambas among other things, as well as some fine reed work, are memorable aspects of these organs. At that period, the flues were made by =   Fackler, the reeds by Badger. Pedal divisions, in larger instruments, = were thunderous, sometimes with independent 10-2/3' stops as well as mighty Trombones.   Odell organs suffered when people attempted to refit them with electric action; when properly restored, tubular pneumatic Odell organs, as well = as their slider-and-pallet soundboards with pneumatic pulldowns, were extraordinarily responsive. Sometimes, it is possible to build pneumatic exhaust actions to fire them as they would have in the original, which = helps preserve the voicing as it was on the slider chests. There are several large, fine, Odell organs which remain unrestored, or in half-restored condition, because the churches involved simply did not wish to continue their commitment to the organ, and directed the funds elsewhere.   Another way of screwing up a perfectly wonderful Odell is to try to = replace the large, double-rise reservoirs with anything else -- small, single-rise =   bellows, or WORSE, trying to convert them to schwimmers. These folks knew =   what they were doing, and if the organs are just put back the way they = were built, they will serve musically for many years to come.   If one looks at Odell mechanisms, they were simply and directly designed, somewhat modular in construction, and very sensible. Their work from the late 1880s and early 1890s has been overlooked, and much of it has been destroyed or electrified, but they are generally fine examples of the = period. Many of their suppliers were the same as those used by Roosevelt, = Jardine, and others were laud of the same period.   I am unfamiliar with any instruments they might have built ORIGINALLY on electric action, so I am unqualified to comment, having only seen their mechanical action and pneumatic slider-and-pallet instruments. One interesting aspect of the late 19th century Odell Pedal organs was their arrangement of each stop on a separate ventil chest, BUT with mechanical action and a pallet or two for each pipe. All the pallets and trackers = moved all the time, and the stop action was controlled by admitting wind to the chest through a large stop action ventil.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: translation, please From: "Colin Hulme" <colin_hulme@lineone.net> Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 21:14:39 +0000       Randolph Runyon wrote: > > > > > Just goes to show what those automatic translators are worth, huh? > You be amused to see what I sometimes get from my less-gifted French > students who try to use them to write their papers. > >   > I am told the acid test for these translators is to get them to = translate a passage and then translate it back into the original tongue. I = am also told that when this test was applied to a Russian translation = program the text "The spirit is strong but the flesh is weak" was returned = as "The Vodka is good but the meat is rotten".   Cheers,   Colin  
(back) Subject: RE: "A Pipe Organ Worthy of Joyous Sounds" - NY Times, Dec 24, 20 00 From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 15:49:38 -0600   NY: Westchester County.   -----Original Message----- From: Darrell Coons [mailto:dcoons@netacc.net] Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2000 1:08 PM To: PipeChat Subject: RE: "A Pipe Organ Worthy of Joyous Sounds" - NY Times, Dec 24, 2000     > Martin Pasi, at work in the sanctuary of the Bedford Presbyterian = Church, > was installing the organ he had built the old-fashioned way -- by hand. >     Which Bedford? NY or NJ? (They would both be served by the NY Times)   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: recital advice From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 17:35:18 EST   I would think that you could play just about anything from your repertory. = I've heard Vierne's Carillon de Westminster played magnificently on a 15 = rank instrument. Use the organ to ITs best advantage. The Eight Little Prelude and Fugues (Bach) would do well; I've played these on a one = manual/17 note pedal organ. Early English voluntaries would work well. Charles Callahan's Green Mountain Organ Book would also do well. Be brave... = try anything.   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Cinema organs (Barton) From: "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net> Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 16:31:14 -0600   As a matter of fact, Dave referred to Marr & Colton as "Myron Cohen" the = jewish organ -- although, not to cast aspersions on a very fine group of people.   TC   Tspiggle@aol.com wrote:   > You obviously don't have a copy of Dave Junchen's "Encyclopedia of the > American Theatre Organ". According to his evaluation, Marr & Coltons = were of > such poor quality, they wouldn't even be on the list. He doesn't have = much > good to say about them. > > Tom > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: CAD Programs X-post From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 17:41:53 EST   I'm looking for a CAD program that is specifically designed for Organbuilders. I have heard that such a thing exists. The program that I = am using now is geared for Architecture and it is frustrating to use for = things like facade design.   Alan B  
(back) Subject: Re: abbreviated music list From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 17:51:13 EST   In a message dated 12/31/00 11:22:58 AM Dateline Standard Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:   << Offertory: Carol Rhapsody Richard Purvis (a smash success, to judge from post-service remarks) >>   This is the trashiest piece of music ever written. Fluff, sensational, shallow, syrupy, sentimental, bombastic, without structure and completely maudlin.   I play it every year.   Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: abbreviated music list From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 17:57:54 -0500   speaking of Carol Rhapsody, and so many other organ pieces based on hymns.......   I've done something to that piece, and I think I might be the only = organist crazy enough to try this---I actually put the words to the three songs (Silent Night, Hark the Herald, and O Come...), and I have the choir sing along with me while I'm playing it. I tried it this year for the first = time, and the congregation loved it.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: RE: Cinema Organs (Barton) From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 18:10:48 EST   I would appear that my e-mailer is recovering from some sort of New Year's =   Eve bash. Sorry for the format in which my last post appeared. Since it was not of extreme benefit, the delete button will correct all problems.   Happy New Year,   Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: Cochereau's Toccata: "Marche des Rois" From: "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 18:52:42 -0500   I have it in a Christmas Music book titled "March of the Three Kings" with the source being `Provencal Melody'. It will definitely be used this = Sunday for Epiphany.   Have a Happy and Musical 2001.....   Bonnie Beth Derby, B.Mus., M.Mus. Producer & Host ``Orgelwerke'' & ``Choral Traditions'' WCNY-FM, 91.3; Syracuse; WUNY-FM, 89.5, Utica; WJNY-FM, 90.9, Watertown Organist & Director of Music, St. James Roman Catholic Church, Syracuse [1988 Odell/Kerner & Merchant 33-rank tracker organ] orge@dreamscape.com ----- Original Message ----- From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, January 01, 2001 2:29 PM Subject: Cochereau's Toccata: "Marche des Rois"     > Can someone tell me if the theme in Pierre Cochereau's Toccata on the > "Marche des Rois", which also appears in Bizet's "L'Arlesienne" suite, = is a > traditional folktune? Or was it composed by Bizet? >