PipeChat Digest #1741 - Wednesday, January 3, 2001
 
Re: electric-action Odell organs (X-posted)
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Karl Cole Plays Rochester on January 14 (cross-posted)
  by "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Re: translation, please
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: translation, please
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: translation, please
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Organ and Harp
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Organ and Harp
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Organ and Harp
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Organ and Harp
  by "Noel Jones, A.A.G.O." <gedeckt@usit.net>
To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by "Eric" <ech1275@home.com>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net>
Re: Cinema organs (Barton)
  by "M. Hackett" <mikehack@u.washington.edu>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by "Noel Jones, A.A.G.O." <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by <ahremsen40@aol.com>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by <ahremsen40@aol.com>
Lent
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: translation, please
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
<My webpage photo album update is on this url
  by "DanielW Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: Lent
  by "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?
  by "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: electric-action Odell organs (X-posted) From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 09:43:53 -0500   >Odell organs from the late 1890s were really tonally superb, especially = when >they had the opportunity to develop full diapason choruses and were in >acoustically fine rooms. Notable Doppelflotes, Harmonic Flutes, and = Great >Viola da Gambas among other things, as well as some fine reed work, are >memorable aspects of these organs. At that period, the flues were made = by >Fackler, the reeds by Badger. Pedal divisions, in larger instruments, = were >thunderous, sometimes with independent 10-2/3' stops as well as mighty >Trombones.   Just wish to insert a little commercial here.... We have a "thunderous" 16' Odell open wood in storage that we are VERY motivated to part with. It even includes the chest for the lower six = pipes. Yes, and there is a regulator or two as well. contact me privately if you have an interest. (and the capability of schlepping it from Poughkeepsie, NY)   Happy New year!   John V      
(back) Subject: Karl Cole Plays Rochester on January 14 (cross-posted) From: "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 10:54:35 -0500   The Rochester Theater Organ Society is very pleased to welcome Karl Cole = to the console of our 4/22 Wurlitzer for his seventh Rochester performance. Karl is currently a resident of Naples, FL but is a native of Syracuse, = our neighboring city to the east.   This January 14th, Sunday afternoon concert at the Auditorium Center, 875 East Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605 will start at 2:30 p. m. with = tickets at $10 each going on sale at the box office one hour before the concert start.   Driving directions, organ specifications and stoplist, many photographs = and membership information may be found at http://theatreorgans.com/rochestr/ = .. Karl Cole's biography and our concert schedule is also available at our "home on the web." For additional information please feel free to e-mail = me.   Karl Cole's presentation will be another stellar theater organ musical event. We'll be looking for you!   Regards, Ken Evans, RTOS President    
(back) Subject: Re: translation, please From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 3 Jan 2001 08:22:06 -0800   Randy,   I can take a better shot at this in a couple of days, when I'm home with = by dictionary, and I'm sure there are others on the list who can do = better, but here goes.   First of all, it appears to be addressed to the Holy Spirit, not the = Father, as the translation would suggest.   > Zeuch ein zu meinen Toren, something like come into my gates. I don't know what zeuchen means.   > Sei meines Herzens Gast. Be my heart's guest.   > Der du, da ich geboren, > Mich neugeboren hast, I don't really get the construction of these lines, but the Winkworth = ("Who gavest me, the earth-born, a second birth more blest") appears close = if you leave off "more blest". I'm not sure, though, that "da ich = geboren" has anything to do with being earth-born.   > O hochgeliebter Geist O most-beloved Spirit   > Des Vater und des Sohnes, of the Father and of the Son   > Mit beiden gleichen Thrones, with both equal thrones (assuming Thron is throne)   > Mit beiden gleich gepreist! with both equally valued.   Obviously, this very literal translation of the last four lines doesn't do = justice to the way they fit together in German, but you get the idea.   Hopefully, somebody out there can improve on this. Bitte!   Dick      
(back) Subject: Re: translation, please From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 11:32:21 -0500     >> Zeuch ein zu meinen Toren, >something like come into my gates. I don't know what zeuchen means.   I believe it means "proceed" as related to travel. "toren" is "tower" I'm = sure. So... proceed into my tower > >> Sei meines Herzens Gast. >Be my heart's guest. > >> Der du, da ich geboren, literally: The you, where I was born >> Mich neugeboren hast, again literally: myself was new(re)born   Hope that helps any?   John V      
(back) Subject: Re: translation, please From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 3 Jan 2001 10:08:40 -0800   On Wed, 03 January 2001, John Vanderlee wrote:   > >> Der du, da ich geboren, literally: The you, where I was born > >> Mich neugeboren hast, again literally: myself was new(re)born   Doesn't "der du mich neugeboren hast" mean "you who have given me = rebirth"?   Where are our Germans?   Dick      
(back) Subject: Organ and Harp From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 13:33:02 EST   Can anyone suggest music for organ and harp which would be appropriate for =   voluntaries on Easter Day?   Thanks,   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and Harp From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 13:35:11 -0500   Claude Debussy wrote some beautiful music for harp, with keyboard accompaniment.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and Harp From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 13:42:23 -0500   Dances by Claude Debussy Romance by Godefroid Etude de Concert by Godefroid   ....just to name a few.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and Harp From: "Noel Jones, A.A.G.O." <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 15:06:45 -0500   John:   MARCEL GRANDJANY (1891-1975): Aria in classic style for Harp and Organ   Absolutely stunning piece! Available from an Maerigan publisher,may be = H.W. Gray.   noel    
(back) Subject: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: "Eric" <ech1275@home.com> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 16:22:11 -0500   Hi folks, Hope all your Christmas and New Years work was successful. Now that we've all recovered from the 'mack truck feeling' after the holidays, it's time = to put together Holy Week - Easter. Being a Catholic Music Director/Organist I have always gone on the assumption that the organ is silenced after the Recessional Hymn on Palm Sunday as the theme moves from Christ The King to the Passion and Death. I did some work for a protestant church before my full time duties with the Catholic faith, and I was reprimanded by the minister that I were to play = a "robust, pull 'em all out" postlude after the Palm Sunday Service. Respecting the minister I did comply with his request and played Dubois's Toccata in a less spirited mood, and afterwards I was greeted with a frown the minister himself. In my work as a Catholic Minister of Music however, I've never played a postlude Palm Sunday only at the Easter Vigil (usually the Widor Toccata No.5). Anyone else practice this idea of No Postlude = Palm Sunday? For that matter no prelude/postlude music is used during Lenten season. For many years, that is when my teacher introduced me to William Mathias I've always began Palm Sunday with his Processional (brilliant tromba solo in the melody- if you are lucky enough to have en chamades use them). Any suggestions on Palm Sunday Postludes, preludes suited for = organ? I am still looking for Jerry R. Brubaker's Responsorial Psalm for Easter "This Is The Day". WLP has no idea who he is, which strikes me odd because he has music published by them, and Mr. Nestor at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception-DC has never gotten back to = me. Joncas's This Is The Day worked fine in a previous position but not where = I am now! Blessings on your ministries.    
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 16:31:11 -0500   Eric,   traditionally, the organ was silenced after communion on Holy Thursday, = not Palm Sunday. The laws on liturgy says that instrumental music without singing is not permitted, meaning everything between communion on Holy Thursday and the Gloria at the Easter Vigil, should be done a Cappella. If however, the singing is weak, the organ can be used to back them up, using soft stops.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net> Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 15:32:23 -0600   Eric,   You are absolutely correct. In our church (Episcopal) there is no music = - or anything else, for that matter - after the altar is stripped. Everyone = leaves in silence.   In our minds, that is correct, and we like it that way.   Tom   Eric wrote:   > > Being a Catholic Music Director/Organist I have always gone on the > assumption that the organ is silenced after the Recessional Hymn on Palm > Sunday as the theme moves from Christ The King to the Passion and Death.    
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net> Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 15:34:10 -0600   Actually, Eric, Carlo is correct -- it is Holy Thursday when I'm supposed = to shut up -- and usually do. (Creeping senility)   Sorry about that :-(   TC   Carlo Pietroniro wrote:   > Eric, > > traditionally, the organ was silenced after communion on Holy Thursday, = not > Palm Sunday.    
(back) Subject: Re: Cinema organs (Barton) From: "M. Hackett" <mikehack@u.washington.edu> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 13:49:13 -0800 (PST)     2/10 is where most good TO's start sizewize, at the bottom end. hokumhall.org is an excellent example (not much bigger than your home!) [3 trem subsystems]   I would consider 3/20 - 24 optimal, provided one has at least 3 trem subsystems...   However, try to stick to one brand of pipe (or 2 max) as hybreds that are not voiced to take multiple pipemakers into account can sound wierd!       > I agree on the excess of theatre organ ranks: 80 IS a bit much -I don't = care > HOW much one is trying to impress somebody. > > One classic example of an ideal instrument was the (GW/Leslie) Pasadena > 3/27? Wurli. Excellent voicing, lots of party favors and choice ranks. A > friend near me has a little Louisville Uniphone -2/5- that is the = sweetest > little instrument I've ever played. > The Tampa Theatre 3/12 Wurli is quite enough to fill the 1200-seat house > with a nice blending of voices. My own 2/9 Wurli installed in a = two-story > ranch-type house is very nice with upstairs pipe chambers which blend = into > the Great Room below with the console and connected piano.    
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: "Noel Jones, A.A.G.O." <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 16:35:39 -0500   It comes to mind that the Sundays in Lent are not considered part of Lent....by the Roman church. The rubrics of old (until Vatican II) = stated that the organ should be silent during Advent and Lent, except the Sundays of :Lent, as I recall. This was in the days where there was an organist = at daily Mass. 6 lit candles on the altar were required for the High Mass, = or sung Mass, only two signified the Mass would be Low Mass, spoken.   This refers not to the act of singing hymns, but the scriptures were = chanted by the priest celebrant and major parts of the mass sung by choir or = cantor.   At the church I was working at in the 60's, if the old priest came out on the altar you'd turn on the organ during lent and advent and do the sung mass with organ, if the young priest came out, all was accapella.   Another delightful wake up was when the priest arrived int eh sanctuary = with black vestments...shut the daily propers book, pull out the Requiem book = and be ready to sing the entire Sequence, Dies Irae. Dies illa...   noel jones Moderator, rodgersorgan@egroups.com        
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: <ahremsen40@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 17:45:57 EST   Folks,   The organ was silenced after the Gloria, Holy Thursday, not after = Communion!  
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 16:57:05 -0600       "Noel Jones, A.A.G.O." wrote:   > It comes to mind that the Sundays in Lent are not considered part of > Lent....by the Roman church. The rubrics of old (until Vatican II) = stated > that the organ should be silent during Advent and Lent, except the = Sundays > of :Lent, as I recall.   From my copy (1961) of the Liber Usualis, p. cviii:   TIMES WHEN THE USE OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS IS FORBIDDEN   (Instruction of the S. Congregation of Rites. 3 Sept. 1958, concerning = sacred music and the liturgy, Ch. 3, no 4, F.)   1. Since organ music, and still more that of other instruments, = constitutes an _adornment_ of the liturgy, the use of these instruments must accord with = the degree of rejoicing that belongs to each day and to each liturgical = season.   2. Consequently, the music of the organ, and every other musical = instrument, is forbidden in all liturgical actions, except Benediction of the B. = sacrament:   a) During the season of Advent, that is from I Vespers of the I Sunday of = Advent until None of Christmas Eve.   b) During Lent and Passiontide; that is, form Matins of Ash Wednesday = until _Gloria in Excelsis_ of the Easter Vigil.   c) On the Ember ferias and Saturday of September, if their Office and Mass = are being said.   d) At the whole Office and Masses of the Dead.   3. Further, the music of instruments other than the organ is forbidden on Septuagesisma, Sexagesima and Quinquagesima Sundays and the Ferias that = follow them.   4). There are the following exceptions to the above prohibitions:   a) The music of the organ and other instruments is allowed on feasts of obligation and holidays (except Sundays), as well as on the feast of the principal patron of the place, of the titular or dedication anniversary of = the particular church, or of the founder of the religious congregation; or if = some extraordinary solemnity is being kept.   b) The music of the organ only, or the harmonium, is allowed on the III = Sunday of Advent, and the IV Sunday of Lent; and on Maunday Thursday at the Mass = of the Holy Oils, and from the beginning of the evening Mass _"in cena Domini"_ = until the end of the _Gloria in excelsis".   c) The music of the organ or Harmonioum is also allowed at Mass and = Vespers solely to support the singing.   The local Ordinaries can regulate the details of these prohibitions and permissions, having regard to the approved customs of the place or = country.   5. During the whole _Triduum sacrum,_ that is from midnight preceeding = Maundy Thursday until _Gloria in excelsis Deo" of the Easter Vigil, the organ and harmonium must remain absolutely silent. They must not be used even to = support the singing; apart from the exceptions given above, 4 b).   The music of the organ and harmonium is equally forbidden during the = _Triduum sacrum,_ with no exception and notwithstanding any contrary custom, in any devotional exercises.   6. Parish priests, and others whom it concerns, should not fail fully to explain to the people the reason for this liturgical silence.    
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 17:58:59 -0500   according to the laws on liturgy as dictated by the CCCB (Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops), the organ may play up until the = communion, after which it may OR may not be silenced, depending on local tradition.   Good Friday: today's reflective mood demands subdued music. If possible, singing should be unaccompanied; if musical instruments are used, they are restricted to necessary accompaniment. Before the service begins, the = choir may sing appropriate hymns, but the entrance procession is to take place = in silence.   Those are direct quote from the Ordo, as published by the CCCB. That's the way it is here.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: <ahremsen40@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 18:07:52 EST   Noel,   I don't know what Roman churches you have attended that "do not consider = the Sundays of Lent as Lent." At the church where I play all of the hymns are =   Lenten, the service music is chant, sung without the organ by the congregation, and all of the choir anthems are also done without the = organ. This is a radical change from what we usually do, and points up the fact, very clearly, that this is the season of Lent.   Best, Allan  
(back) Subject: Lent From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 18:35:55 -0500   whoever said the Sundays in Lent are not part of Lent was correct. Do the math. From Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday is 46 days. The 6 extra days are the 5 Sundays of Lent and Palm/Passion Sunday.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: translation, please From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 18:47:31 -0500   > >> Zeuch ein zu meinen Toren, > >something like come into my gates. I don't know what zeuchen means. > > I believe it means "proceed" as related to travel. "toren" is "tower" > I'm sure. So... proceed into my tower   Nope. Means "gates". ex, "der Brandenburger Tor". Tower would be "Turm"   Cheers, TommyLee    
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 19:02:36 -0500   Allan:   Though the Sundays fall within the Lenten season, and sermons and texts of readings in the current three year cycle now in use may reflect the time of the liturgical year, the Sundays are not part of Lent. During the old days of the 50's, fasting was observed 6 days of the week and total abstinence from meat was observed as well on Fridays, but Sundays were exempt from this. As I recall it was the custom to "give up something for lent" and this denial was for the entire time of lent...including Sundays even though Sundays were not lenten days. = Confused?.   The Friday abstinence from meat was instituted by the American Bishops, and was never observed in Italy, a big surprise for Americans when in Rome. So some of this was local tradition rather than by edict of the mother church.   However, the church WAS silent and dark from Holy Thursday until the bells were rung during the Easter Vigil, and the music performed on Sundays that fell in the time of Lent was often Lenten in nature....Woops, not entirely accurate. High Mass on Sunday used the propers and ordinary chants as proscribed. The choir might sing an anthem at Communion or at the Offertory that might be lenten or fitting for the Eucharist. But at that Mass it was in Latin anyhow. At the low mass the organ was played, rarely any choral singing and no singing (horrors!) by the congregation.   What you do at your church makes much more sense than what we did back = then!   But as Carlo has said, count the days...Sundays fall within the Lenten season, but are not Lent. I hope that someone more educated than I can shed some light in this subject.   Any recordings of your congregation and chant? I'd love to hear an mp3 or two, and sure others would as well.   It sounds like you have a wonderful program there.   Noel  
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 19:09:41 -0500   Noel Stoutenburg:   Thank you for digging out the Liber! It all is returning to me...   Don't know where my old Liber is. Was given to me by a Priest during the beginning of Vatican II.   It was even more complicated than I remember, since the local priest often did what he wanted rather than what Rome ordered. Just like today. I guess.   Now, can anyone tell Carlo and I what the definitive word is about Sundays being part of or in lent?   Noel Jones  
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 21:01:53 EST   Hi Noel:   A postlude can be played on the fourth sunday of lent, as It is Laetare Sunday. The vestments are Rose color, and you can indeed play at will on that Sunday. It is March 25th this year. The reason for this every =   year is St. Joseph's feast day is March 19th, and is an oasis within the Lenten season. When lent starts early the fourth Sunday is at least six days = before March 19th, when it is late the fourth Sunday is as much as six days after as is this year. Check the Ordo, I believe this is correct. At anyrate, Laetare means praise, alleluia, and perhaps Hooray, Lent is half over!!! It is intended as a break right in the middle of Lent, as Lent must be only forty days. = There are five or six other days where white vestments are worn, otherwise Lent would have 46 days, from Ash Wednesday until Resurection or Easter Sunday. Easter every year is determined by the first full moon after the Vernal Equinox. Holy Thursday, the day of the last Supper, comes on the Full moon or just after. Passover and Easter are always very close together. The = first full moon determines this after the Vernal Equinox March 21st. The early Christians after all considered themselves Jews, and that Messiah had = indeed come, Emmanuel (God with us)! Jews determine Passover by the self same means. The Liturgical Service follows the Jewish Synagog Service in = remarkable consequence and order. The tradition has carried on for over 2,000 years = in this same way. Catholics, Anglicans, Episcopalians, and Lutherans, follow this liturgically without question. The rest of Christianity also follows this example. The root, Judaism from which the Christian Church ultimately sprung.   I hope this clears up why a postlude can be played on the Fourth Sunday of Lent. It is a day of rejoycing!   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: <My webpage photo album update is on this url From: "DanielW Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 22:16:07 -0400   Hey there Here is what all of yas have been looking for<G> An updated pic page of my Pipe Organ ,THere you will find pics of my = Christmas holiday s and lots of new pics of my Pipe ORgan, good quality = ones,also additions I have been making ,and some never been seen before pipes of the pipe organ pictures Its been a long time coming and now here it is picture 22 and on are the new ones http://homepages.go.com/~danielswebpagelockeportnovascotia/albums/album1/   Danielwh '2000' E. Power Biggs Fellow Recipient    
(back) Subject: Re: Lent From: "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 22:20:03 -0600   This is correct, the Sundays are not counted as part of the 40 days, but = are usually included in most Lenten traditions, such as no Hallelujahs, etc.   Jim H.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> To: "Pipe Chat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 5:35 PM Subject: Lent     > whoever said the Sundays in Lent are not part of Lent was correct. Do = the > math. From Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday is 46 days. The 6 extra days = are > the 5 Sundays of Lent and Palm/Passion Sunday. > > Carlo > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 22:17:25 -0600       noel jones wrote:   > Now, can anyone tell Carlo and I what the definitive word is about > Sundays being part of or in lent?   My understanding is that the most ancient tradition of the Church is that every Sunday is a remembrance of the resurrection, and thus is not part of a penitential season, so that the Sundays that occur between Ash Wednesday and Easter are "in" Lent, but not "of" Lent. The understanding is that the "forty days of Lent" echo the forty days Jesus spent in the Wilderness, and since the Sundays don't count, to make the full forty days, one must back up to Ash Wednesday. The only sources I have at hand to document this, however, are not Roman ones, but my inquiry suggests that this is the current official position of the Roman Church, as well.     An interesting side note: a recently released Compact Disk by the Orchestra of the Renaissance under the direction of Michael Noone on the "Glossa" label (GCD921402), presents a proposed "reconstruction" of the Requiem Mass and Office of Francisco Guerrero, the Spanish Composer who died at Seville in 1599. Based upon payroll records of the Cathedral, there was quite a number of musicians, including instrumentalists, who participated in the music (which was most likely Guerrero's own setting of the Requiem). I suspect the prohibition on "instruments" is probably of relatively recent origin, (mid 19th Century, perhaps), and may be an outgrowth of the Romantic idea that vocal music is only for the human voice.   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is? From: "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net> Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 22:21:45 -0600   If memory serves me, last year we just discussed whether to use a reed during Lent. Ah, the plots do thicken.   Jim H.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Thomas H. Cotner" <cotnerpo@brightok.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 3:32 PM Subject: Re: To play or not to play...a postlude that is?     > In our minds, that is correct, and we like it that way. > > Tom > > Eric wrote: > Big Snip > > > & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >