PipeChat Digest #1761 - Thursday, January 11, 2001
 
NYC recital 1/28 X Post
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu>
OFF-TOPIC (if you like) - Southern Shape-note Singing
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Moller's bankruptcy AND LA archdiocese cans Dobson?
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
RE: An Interesting Situation
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: An Interesting Situation
  by "conmara" <conmara@grandcanyonhiker.com>
Relationship between Moller and Trivo - any?
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: Feb 18 Severance Concert
  by "Jerald Marshall" <marshallduet@ameritech.net>
RE: Feb 18 Severance Concert
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Zwolle anyone?
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Moller's reeds / an Austin reed question
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Relationship between Moller and Trivo - any?
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
RE:  LA archdiocese cans Dobson?
  by "John Panning" <jpanning@cal-net.net>
Engaging God's People in Meaningful Song
  by "Eric" <ech1275@home.com>
RE: Engaging God's People in Meaningful Song
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: OFF-TOPIC (if you like) - Southern Shape-note Singing - a historic fo
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: new subject----baoque short-length reeds
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Amplified Reed WurliTzer w/ real pipes?
  by "Bob Kinner" <rkinner@one.net>
 

(back) Subject: NYC recital 1/28 X Post From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 14:18:11 -0500 (EST)     Greetings, PipeChat...   It's been some time since I have posted in. I am posting in now with an update and an announcement.   I have left Bloomington, Indiana..for the most part. (Degree is almost done!)   I have taken the position of Organist and Choirmaster of The Church of the Epiphany, an historic Episcopal parish on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. We are home to Aeolian-Skinner opus 1412--one number lower, I am told, than Alice Millar Chapel at Northwestern, and tonally unaltered--a fine, musical, 3m/50r Whiteford, incorporating some pipework from the 1939 Steere that preceded it. (Yes, it has several luscious celestes and very French reeds.)   You can visit the organ on the web at www.epiphanynyc.org.     I am holding my debut recital at Epiphany on Sunday, January 28, 2001 at 7 PM. The program will feature works by Bruhns, Bach, and Dupre, as well as the Paul Creston Rapsodie for Alto Saxophone and Organ, opus 108a. For this wonderful piece I will be joined by Bill Powers, a classical saxophonist out of the Indiana University School of Music. Program is FREE.   The Church of the Epiphany is located at 1393 York Avenue--east of First Avenue--at 74th St. Public transportation is best; take the No. 6 subway to 77th St. and walk east, then south. (This route lets you drop in and see the spanking-new hundred-something rank Wicks at the Church of St. Jean Baptiste--an organ that is shaping up very nicely indeed, and what a room!)   Epiphany is a wonderful architectural and acoustical space, done in the Norman style, and is home to a Norman baptismal font...early 12th century...a gift to the church some years ago. Quite wonderful!     If you're in the NYC area, I'd love to greet you at this recital.   Best wishes--   Jonathan B. Hall, FAGO    
(back) Subject: OFF-TOPIC (if you like) - Southern Shape-note Singing From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 11:26:46 -0800     --------------DD96977FC4483D30F9906D69 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   REAL shape-note singing ("All-Day Sing With Dinner On The Grounds") is ALWAYS done unaccompanied ... the tuning forks used to get the pitch are handed down from generation to generation of singing-masters.   Singers sit in a hollow square, with the conductor in the center. Most older singers have all the hymns memorized, and often conduct along with the conductor.   Each piece is sung through first with the four-syllable sol-fa syllables, and then with the words ... the scale is fa-sol-la-fa-sol-la-ti-fa, rather than doh-re-mi-fa-sol-la-ti-doh ...   I never quite figured out how they keep track of the difference between fa on the FIRST degree of the scale and fa on the FOURTH degree of the scale, but they do; attempts to introduce the seven-syllable system were regarded as Yankee interventionism (grin), and met with GREAT resistance.   A couple of seven-syllable shape-note hymnals were produced, and I think there are one or two seven-syllable Sings, but they're basically a foot-note to the four-shape Sacred Harp Harmony cultus, which basically rules the roost.   BTW, the Southern Baptist Sunday School Board keeps the classic Sacred Harp Harmony in print, and I read recently that there is a completely NEW edition, newly typeset, put out by a consortium of some of the singing conventions. I'm SURE it will controversial, given the rock-ribbed conservatism of shape-note singers (grin).   Part distribution is as follows, men doubling at the octave below and contraltos doubling at the octave above, in the case of the bass part   Soprano - the highest sopranos AND the highest tenors Alto - mezzos, altos and baritones Tenor - the STRONGEST tenors and sopranos, as the melody is ALWAYS in the tenor Bass - contraltos and basses   The doublings make for a VERY thick texture in some cases.   MOST of the denominational hymnals in the Southern churches were available in shape-note notation as late as the 1950s ... I have a shape-note Cokesbury Worship Hymnal around here somewhere, and I've seen a shape-note 1939 Methodist Hymnal, and a Broadman Hymnal ... but oddly enough, the REAL a cappella Sacred Harp Harmony tradition IN CHURCH ON SUNDAY seems to survive only WAAAAY back in the hills of Appalachia ... most of the Southern singing conventions seem to be content to get together once a month, once a quarter, or once a year for a big "all-day sing", which, interestingly enough, usually DOESN'T include preaching, except for the occasional "testimony" introducing a song ...   "I first sang 'New Britain' in nineteen-aught-eight at Sister Eulalia Williams' funeral at the First Bapist Church in Bradley Junction, Florida ... it was a hot day that day ... Lord! that woman was a FINE singer ... "   and so forth (grin) ... fascinating bits of rural oral history ... some of it has been gotten down on tape, but not much.   It's a FASCINATING chapter of American music history ... one that the present-day advocates of "sacred folk music" could well learn (grin).   The modal melodies are hauntingly beautiful ... one little-known example that comes to mind is "Kedron", from the Southern Harmony, #81 in the Episcopal Hymnal 1940; another is "Cross of Jesus", which I think I saw in a recent Methodist hymnal.   Cheers,   Bud   Rebekah Ingram wrote:   > I'm assuming that this was done traditionally a capella, but does > anyone know if there are cases of the organ being used here? -Rebekah   --------------DD96977FC4483D30F9906D69 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> <body bgcolor=3D"#FFFFFF"> REAL shape-note singing ("All-Day Sing With Dinner On The Grounds") is ALWAYS done unaccompanied ... the tuning forks used to get the pitch are handed down from generation to generation of singing-masters. <p>Singers sit in a hollow square, with the conductor in the center. Most older singers have all the hymns memorized, and often conduct along with the conductor. <p>Each piece is sung through first with the four-syllable sol-fa = syllables, and then with the words ... the scale is fa-sol-la-fa-sol-la-ti-fa, rather than doh-re-mi-fa-sol-la-ti-doh ... <p>I never quite figured out how they keep track of the difference between fa on the FIRST degree of the scale and fa on the FOURTH degree of the scale, but they do; attempts to introduce the seven-syllable system were regarded as Yankee interventionism (grin), and met with GREAT resistance. <p>A couple of seven-syllable shape-note hymnals were produced, and I = think there are one or two seven-syllable Sings, but they're basically a = foot-note to the four-shape Sacred Harp Harmony cultus, which basically rules the roost. <p>BTW, the Southern Baptist Sunday School Board keeps the classic Sacred Harp Harmony in print, and I read recently that there is a completely NEW edition, newly typeset, put out by a consortium of some of the singing conventions. I'm SURE it will controversial, given the rock-ribbed = conservatism of shape-note singers (grin). <p>Part distribution is as follows, men doubling at the octave below and contraltos doubling at the octave above, in the case of the bass part <p>Soprano - the highest sopranos AND the highest tenors <br>Alto - mezzos, altos and baritones <br>Tenor - the STRONGEST tenors and sopranos, as the melody is ALWAYS in the tenor <br>Bass - contraltos and basses <p>The doublings make for a VERY thick texture in some cases. <p>MOST of the denominational hymnals in the Southern churches were = available in shape-note notation as late as the 1950s ... I have a shape-note = Cokesbury Worship Hymnal around here somewhere, and I've seen a shape-note 1939 = Methodist Hymnal, and a Broadman Hymnal ... but oddly enough, the REAL a cappella Sacred Harp Harmony tradition IN CHURCH ON SUNDAY seems to survive only WAAAAY back in the hills of Appalachia ... most of the Southern singing conventions seem to be content to get together once a month, once a = quarter, or once a year for a big "all-day sing", which, interestingly enough, = usually DOESN'T include preaching, except for the occasional "testimony" = introducing a song ... <p>"I first sang 'New Britain' in nineteen-aught-eight at Sister Eulalia Williams' funeral at the First Bapist Church in Bradley Junction, Florida .... it was a hot day that day ... Lord! that woman was a FINE singer ... " <p>and so forth (grin) ... fascinating bits of rural oral history ... some of it has been gotten down on tape, but not much. <p>It's a FASCINATING chapter of American music history ... one that the present-day advocates of "sacred folk music" could well learn (grin). <p>The modal melodies are hauntingly beautiful ... one little-known = example that comes to mind is "Kedron", from the Southern Harmony, #81 in the = Episcopal Hymnal 1940; another is "Cross of Jesus", which I think I saw in a recent Methodist hymnal. <p>Cheers, <p>Bud <p>Rebekah Ingram wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><style></style> <font size=3D-1>I'm assuming that this was done traditionally a capella, but does anyone know if there are cases of the organ being used here?</font>&nbsp;<font = size=3D-1>-Rebekah</font></blockquote>   </body> </html>   --------------DD96977FC4483D30F9906D69--    
(back) Subject: Re: Moller's bankruptcy AND LA archdiocese cans Dobson? From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 13:27:33 -0600   At 2:11 AM -0800 1/11/01, Bob Scarborough wrote: >LATE-BREAKING RUMOR: Word is circulating in LA that the LA >archdiocese's new barn (known to most as "Mahoney Memorial") has >trashed the Dobson/Rosales organ proposal, and will instead reuse >the aged but capable Wangerin rebuilt by Austin c. 1990 that resided >at "St. Vibrator's" up until the '94 Northridge quake.   Bob   I think this might just be some wishful thinking on the part of some people, people who are prone to cause rumors to raise a ruckus. One of my bosses did some checking this morning and as far is known the Dobson/Rosales is being built. Actually, according to our sources, the structural steel for the organ is in place already.   There are cost over-runs that are happening as part of the building of the whole complex but none of them affect the organ, again according to our source.   I'm glad you titled this section of your posting as "Rumor" since that is what it is at this point. And I would suggest that this topic be dropped since there is no factual evidence at this point in time.   David  
(back) Subject: RE: An Interesting Situation From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 14:28:14 EST   Hi Listers and Rebecca,   My sympathies as a similar happening occurred in my senior year. The = degree plan changed but many were not told until midway through the first = semester of the senior year.   I really have no firm suggestions but would urge you to consider something =   that will not involve much outside study (research) or abstract participation. If you decide on a PE course, consider golf. It is a lifetime activity which can bring a lot of enjoyment.   You might check with your university's athletic department for some = slam-dunk (no pun intended) courses. They usually have some for the jocks who find themselves a bit short in credit hours. Some of the better known subjects =   are:   Remedial Basket Weaving For Serious Athletes Contemplation of Water as a Liquid Form Air Appreciation Through Deep Breathing Studies Organization of a 3-Ring Binder In A Collegiate Environment Diploma Mailing Versus Walking the Stage Alumni Participation For Fun And Fellowship and the ever popular   Proper Presentation of the Nike Swoosh in Casual Attire   All attempts at humor aside, congratulations on being so near graduation. =   Hopefully you will fill the credit hour swiftly with something you find fascinating.   Best Wishes,   Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: An Interesting Situation From: "conmara" <conmara@grandcanyonhiker.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 14:56:39 -0600   Rebekah -   Although I'm completely new to the group I can't resist...first - congratulations on almost being there. Like a lot of goals - suddenly you look up and it's there.   I would think that to play the organ well requires a high level of physical fitness. I'd even bet that weight training would pay off. PhysEd people can show you how to get in shape and make it more interesting.   I didn't get in shape until I was 45 - and I still find the people at the gym a little hard to take - but it's worth the effort and leads to things you might never expect.   My comment would be - embrace the PE requirement find something challenging - even if it gets in the way of your schedule.   > > I have an interesting situation here, which requires input. This is my > final semester at SU ("Thank gawd!" as they say here), and I have one > credit to fill. I would like to take a PhysEd course as I never had > before. However, my options all seem to fall on Thursday nights, > which, as we all know, is not really a viable option for an > organist/choir director. >   -- KenMc - conmara@grandcanyonhiker.com http://www.grandcanyonhiker.com See our new video - 'Hiking the Grand Canyon - The Corridor Trails'  
(back) Subject: Relationship between Moller and Trivo - any? From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 11:55:02 -0800   I've often heard that Trivo was a very good reed company. Same town. You have to wonder if they at least swapped employees around.   There is a fairly small 1920's Austin in a church outside Birmingham, Alabama. It is a refugee from some other location. I played it as installed and the Cornopean was a wheezy, quacky old thing that half the notes did not work. Several years later I stopped by again on the way to the "Iron City," The stop tabs were the same but the Cornopean had turned into the most wonderful English style reed with so much character. I thought it was new. The "Diapason" sure sounded wonderful too and I = thought my ears were messing with me. I discovered that they had used a "Chimes = mp" tab as a 4' extension and with the super coupler you had a darn good 8-4-2 Principal. and with that reed a wonderful english sound.   Later I found out that Trivo had rebuilt/revoiced the old Austin reed, and Tom Anderson built the new 8' Principal. I think John Hendriksen voiced = the Principal but I am not sure.   Anyway...interesting discussion.   Randy    
(back) Subject: Re: Feb 18 Severance Concert From: "Jerald Marshall" <marshallduet@ameritech.net> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 15:02:23 -0500   Mack, From my understanding I heard that the Feb.18 & March 11 will be broadcast over WCLV. 95.5 FM.   Cheers, Jerald Marshall     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Mack" <dm726@delphi.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>; <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2001 11:50 PM Subject: Re: Feb 18 Severance Concert     > Does anyone know it these concerts will be broadcast via the web ?? > > Is any station with webcasting abilities still going to broadcast the > dedication concert again? > > Thanks, > Mack > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: RE: Feb 18 Severance Concert From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 14:18:07 -0600   And on their web site, www.wclv.com.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Jerald Marshall [mailto:marshallduet@ameritech.net] Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 2:02 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Feb 18 Severance Concert     Mack, From my understanding I heard that the Feb.18 & March 11 will be broadcast over WCLV. 95.5 FM.   Cheers, Jerald Marshall     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Mack" <dm726@delphi.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>; <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu> Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2001 11:50 PM Subject: Re: Feb 18 Severance Concert     > Does anyone know it these concerts will be broadcast via the web ?? > > Is any station with webcasting abilities still going to broadcast the > dedication concert again? > > Thanks, > Mack > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Zwolle anyone? From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 15:51:20 -0500   Is there anyone on this list from Holland or Holland organs knowledgeable? I'm curious to know the state of existence of the organ at St. Michael's = at Zwolle? Anyone? Robert Colasacco PS In attempting to send this my spell checker offers swollen for Zwolle. = So I add is the Organ at Zwolle swollen?   Robert B. Colasacco Administrative Assistant/Secretary Distinguished Colleagues Population Council One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza New York, NY 10017 Direct Telephone: (212) 339-0685 Main Telephone: (212) 339-0500 Fax: (212) 755-6052 e-mail: rcolasacco@popcouncil.org Visit our web site: www.popcouncil.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Moller's reeds / an Austin reed question From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 16:59:44 EST   In a message dated 1/11/01 1:22:16 PM EST, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   > > Anybody have any idea who was doing the reed work at Austin in those = days, > and/or if there are any more outstanding Austin reeds surviving from = that > period? T%his is a GUESS on my part, but it is entirely possible that the French Trumpet might have been a supply-shop set from someone like Gottfried, who =   had a reputation for turning out some gorgeous reed sets in the time frame =   you set (the late '20's). That would certainly account for the contrast.   Rick M Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Relationship between Moller and Trivo - any? From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 17:06:59 EST   In a message dated 1/11/01 3:00:07 PM EST, randyterry@laumc.org writes:   > I've often heard that Trivo was a very good reed company. Same town. = You > have to wonder if they at least swapped employees around. > TRIVo was founded by three former Moller reed voicers. At one time, after = he semi-retired from MOller, Adolf Zacic (then the undisputed = best-of-the-best reed voicer working) did some work for TRIVo, including (according to the stories I have heard) the fabulous Trompetta Majestatis that Tony Bufano installed in Riverside.   Both TRIVo and Eastern Organ PIpes are 'remnants' of the Moller factory, = but TRIVo was started in the 1970's, long before MOller closed their doors, whereas EOP was founded by Rick Morrison and a couple other dis-placed = MOller voicers after the demise.   As a side note, Eastern opgan pipes bought one set of Moller's tapered mandrels for resonator shaping, the other set resides here in Staunton, VA = at the "facteur" of Messrs Taylor and Boody.   Rick M Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: RE: LA archdiocese cans Dobson? From: "John Panning" <jpanning@cal-net.net> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 16:11:36 -0600   It's generally not my style to dignify ridiculous rumors with a response. However, I feel compelled to say that there's no truth whatsoever to the notions advanced by Bob Scarborough that the Archdiocese of Los Angeles = has somehow "trashed" its contract with our firm. Construction of the instrument in our shop is underway at this very moment. A stoplist can be found on our website at http:www.dobsonorgan.com ; additional construction photos will be posted there soon. And to answer Mr. Terry's concerns: many pipes have been retained from the St. Vibiana instrument, and are being revised for use in the new organ.   The organ will be installed early in 2002, following completion of the cathedral building. Mr. Scarborough and any others are invited to visit during the installation; I will be happy to give them a personal tour.   Best regards,   John A. Panning Tonal Director Dobson Pipe Organ Builders Lake City, Iowa 51449 http://www.dobsonorgan.com mailto:dobson@cal-net.net  
(back) Subject: Engaging God's People in Meaningful Song From: "Eric" <ech1275@home.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 17:16:14 -0500   Hello folks, Can any of you recommend some David M. Cherwien material- (organ improvisations,arrangments,introductions). The only piece of literature I have and I 'highly recommend it' to all church organists is his "Let The People Sing!" book. I've had it for a couple of years and I just finished reading it cover-cover 'for a third time' to refresh my thinking and = playing after hearing one Sunday 'the organ was too loud' (thank God it wasn't a comment about Christmas services!) Is Dupre's Complete Course in Organ Improvisation out of print? If any of you out there want to get rid of it please let me know. Peace -Eric-    
(back) Subject: RE: Engaging God's People in Meaningful Song From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 16:24:51 -0600   Eric:   Check out "Gotta Toccata," short organ works on familiar hymn tunes.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Eric [mailto:ech1275@home.com] Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 4:16 PM To: Pipechat@Pipechat. Org Subject: Engaging God's People in Meaningful Song Importance: High     Hello folks, Can any of you recommend some David M. Cherwien material- (organ improvisations,arrangments,introductions). The only piece of literature I have and I 'highly recommend it' to all church organists is his "Let The People Sing!" book. I've had it for a couple of years and I just finished reading it cover-cover 'for a third time' to refresh my thinking and = playing after hearing one Sunday 'the organ was too loud' (thank God it wasn't a comment about Christmas services!) Is Dupre's Complete Course in Organ Improvisation out of print? If any of you out there want to get rid of it please let me know. Peace -Eric-     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC (if you like) - Southern Shape-note Singing - a historic footnote From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 18:45:08 EST   In a message dated 1/11/01 2:26:55 PM EST, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   > the REAL a cappella Sacred Harp Harmony tradition IN CHURCH ON > SUNDAY seems to survive only WAAAAY back in the hills of Appalachia ... The original shape-note hymn-books (Sacred Harp) traveled west with the pioneers who ventured (at least at first) thru the central Shenandoah = Valley of virginia. THese books were printed in a small village som 10 or 15 = miles to the west of what is now Harrisonburg, VA. The village is still in existance and is now known as Singers Glen, in honour of the fact that the =   fellow that printed the first editions of the book lived and worked there. =     Rick Maryman Staunton, VA  
(back) Subject: Re: new subject----baoque short-length reeds From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 18:45:06 EST   In a message dated 1/11/01 5:52:16 AM EST, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   > A good=20 > example of his rather loudly but interestingly voiced Vox Humana is in th= e=20 > National Shrine of the Imac. Concep. in DC, and examples of his en chamad= e=20 > work abound still. One could argue successfully that M=F6ller's reed wor= k=20 > was far more interesting and was held in higher esteem than their flue=20 work=20 > of the time of Zajic's tenure there. > =20 Actually, just about every stop in the "Shrine" organ is loud...the building= =20 sort of demands it. I have the utmost respect for the late A. Zacic's work.=20 As for his tenure, he was at Moller for a LONG time and likely trained most=20 if not all of Molelr's reed voicers from the 60's onward. I have played many= =20 (and tuned a bunch, also) of Moller organs with AZ's reeds in them. The Shrine's Pontifical trumpet was the first use of Bronze resonators and=20 you sit eye-to-eye with it at the gallery console...it'll part your hair!!!!= =20 - the perfect stop for those fanfares in the recently discussed=20 Tournemire"Vicitmae Paschali".   Rick M Staunton Va  
(back) Subject: Re: Amplified Reed WurliTzer w/ real pipes? From: "Bob Kinner" <rkinner@one.net> Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 18:48:33 -0500   John,   I used to own one of these instruments - and offer a word of caution: the = "pickups" placed near the reeds act as tiny condensor microphones. As such the = voltage on them - and on the contacts - is in the neighborhood of 300 VDC (at only a few = uA). Exercise caution when plying around near the contact bars.   Bob   Thomas H. Cotner wrote:   > John, > > The Wurlitzer model 4602 was one of the later reed models, using = constant running > reeds -- in other words, the reeds are oscillating all the time, and the = signal > from them is keyed through keying networks. Unlike the earlier models = designed > similarly to the Everett Orgatron, when the reeds only sounded when = they were > keyed via a magnetically operated pallet for each reed, these wind = chests are > sealed, and do not lend themselves to attachments, nor do the keys, save = adding > additional key contacts -- unless someone has developed some method of = using the > existing keying. > > You are best off with a small additional blower imho, and extra key = contacts. > That is the safest, and probably the most practical (translate - = cheapest) > method. > > Tom > > DRAWKNOB@aol.com wrote: > > > Hello everyone, > > > > I have a question which may seem "out there", but here it goes... > > > > I have a WurliTzer 4602 amplified reed organ in my home -- is it = possible > > and/or worthwhile to add a rank or two of real pipes to it? I have = access to > > a few ranks of old pipes and I have a small old reservoir. I also = have 3 > > tilt tabs on the console which are for all practical purposes that are > > prepared for something not in use or even installed. I have the = knowledge > > and ability to build my own windchest/toe boards/rack boards/etc; = however, I > > have questions about the winding... Could I tap into the reed box for = the > > wind? Would that upset the balance/pressure there? Or should I get a = small > > independent blower for the pipes? > > > > Any and all advice/suggestions are appreciated. > > > > Thanks, > > > > John > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org       -- Bob Kinner AA8FH rkinner@one.net "If at first you don't succeed, switch to power tools." Red Green