PipeChat Digest #1791 - Saturday, January 27, 2001
 
Proulx: We  Adore You, O Christ
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
MIDI and tracker organs?
  by "Pannings" <jpanning@cal-net.net>
Re: Moller Rechesting/Extensions
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Moller Extraction - Day Two (X-posted)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Moller Extraction - Day Two (X-posted)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Moller Extraction - Day Two (X-posted)
  by "Ray Thursby" <raythursby@earthlink.net>
Re: sostenuto reversible
  by "randy terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
Re: Moller Rechesting/Extensions
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
A nice Experience!
  by "Stu Ballinger" <wa2bss@vh.net>
visiting Cincinnati
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Moller Extraction - Day Two (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: St. Peter's Episcopal Redwood City CA
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Moller Extraction - Day Two (X-posted)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
virus warning
  by <snyder@skyenet.net>
Re: visiting Cincinnati
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Moller V/205 Info & Specs now online
  by "Dan Miller" <dmiller@rodgers.rain.com>
Re: Moller Rechesting/Extensions
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 

(back) Subject: Proulx: We Adore You, O Christ From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 15:33:25 -0500 (EST)     I've begun to rehearse Richard Proulx "We Adore You, O Christ" (Paraclete PPM09836) for Good Friday. The text is identified as from the Orthodox service for the day, and I've wondered if that is the "take-off" point for pitch organization.   Proulx seems to be working with the following pitch pattern -- mode or scale:   c - d - e -f sharp - g - a - b flat     Between the pitch material and the pedal tones, the piece is reminiscent of "Song for Athene" by John Taverner, sung so movingly as the recessional music at Princees Diana's funeral.   Can anyone identify this organization of pitches as a given mode by name and perhaps even by place of its origin? Or is it purely original?   I've begun to like Proulx's piece very much.   Thanx for any help.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: MIDI and tracker organs? From: "Pannings" <jpanning@cal-net.net> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 15:18:47 -0600   A few things need to be clarified in Ron Severin's recent postings.   "Going electro/Mechanical...[and]...Solid stating the console...open the door to Midi which is now becoming a feature on some new trackers too. Expanded piston memory is another. Oh! I know the T. Backers would never stoop to using such things, but it is an option. <G>"   Ron's gotten the tracker builder's prejudices all backward. No organ equipped solely with a mechanical action can have MIDI; it must have a complete electric action also: i.e., contacts under the keys (or sensors on the pallet or channel) and electric pulldowns "piggybacked" somewhere in the mechanical action. Since this means two complete actions, it's pretty rare. I would guess it's found only where a large tracker also has a remote electric console.   The other mistaken prejudice: Unlike Ron's assertion about what tracker backers will stoop to, most tracker builders incorporate solid state combination actions if asked. Even those who work in strongly historical styles have done so: Fritts, Brombaugh, and others.   And thirdly:   "Frank was trained at Aeolian/Skinner, he's my organ Maintenance man, and he's worked on all my instruments for over 20 years. ... He also was the Moller rep. for several years. He does know what he's doing, and does wonderful work. He uses the very best materials and replacement parts. Schoenstein does the exact same thing, under Bethards."   This last sentence is a true statement if you mean that Schoenstein knows what they're doing, does wonderful work, uses the very best materials. If you mean that Schoenstein puts DE magnets into M=F6ller organs, or uses DE magnets in their new work, = I think you're mistaken.   This isn't "Pick on Ron Day"...just a few comments that required clarificati= on.   John A. Panning Lake City, Iowa      
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Rechesting/Extensions From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 16:36:15 EST   For the best tonal results, stick with electropneumatic action for the unit stops, and place the remaining straight choruses on slider-and-pallet =   soundboards. Lyle Blackinton developed a vertical-drop electropneumatic pallet that has been adopted and modified by several builders and = suppliers, with very fine results. A circuit for every pipe just makes for more things to go wrong, in the =   opinion of some experienced organbuilders, and over-unification really = makes for bad balance in ensemble. High quality hairsheep hides (as opposed to poor quality horse hides), properly treated, will last for many, many decades; don't be scared by = the uproar over the alleged long-term costs of leather in pipe organ actions. =   Leather can and does exhibit longevity. Make certain that the party you retain to execute the revoicing and = tonal finishing is actually QUALIFIED to do that. In addition to hearing their work, ask to SEE the pipes -- neatness of cutups and nicking, absence of burrs in toeholes, execution of scrolling, damage to languids, = straightness of upper and lower lips, etc. Ask to see their RECENT work (give them the =   benefit of experience and maturation), including reed stops. Good luck with the project. Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Extraction - Day Two (X-posted) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 13:40:49 -0800   At 05:08 PM 1/26/2001 -0800, you wrote: >Here's a question that's sure to provoke a discussion (grin): the organ >man wants to replace the pitman action with electro-mechanical. He says=20 >it's something like $18 a note to releather the pitmans, and $14 a note to= =20 >change it to electro-mechanical.<snip>   EM action has improved greatly in the last 50 years, and I'm a proponent of= =20 it. Pitman chests, as well as they worked, are still "holdover" technology= =20 from the salad days of the Industrial Revolution, and have been proven=20 unreliable over long time spans, due to the use of pneumatic leather. The= =20 *original* formulation of Perflex looked to spell those problems, but a=20 subsequent reformulation rendered it useless. Another argument against any= =20 electropneumatic action is its energy inefficiency.   One must also look at greatly improved rectifier technology available when= =20 considering EM action, also. Prior to solid state controls, rectifiers in= =20 such service were comparatively inefficient, as they had to be able to=20 supply full rated current demand only once in awhile, while usually being=20 quite oversized for most "normal" registrations. Modern rectifiers,=20 including those using switching technology, are far more efficient.   Rearrangements, such as duplexing or unifying a stop, are easily effected=20 with EM, whereas, what you got with a pitman chest was basically what you=20 kept, unless you wanted to spend a lot of money. All changes are=20 electrical, and don't require tearing up a chest just to make a change in=20 assignment or add duplexing!   I don't quite see the immediate savings, however, since you'll need to also= =20 buy a new solid state relay along with the action, and may (almost=20 certainly) find that you'll have to revoice the entire organ. However,=20 once all this is accomplished, releathering will never happen again, so=20 the real cost savings is "down the road apiece", along with enjoying=20 increased reliability and flexibility in the meantime.   Of course, the question of how much funding is available will dictate your= =20 course of action. Personally, I would rather spend the money now on=20 complete conversion to EM with solid state relay, since is will, 1.) save=20 money when additions (which are sure to follow) come along, 2.) will save=20 money spent on senseless releatherings for more important things, like new= =20 ranks, and 3.) provide you with assured reliability (assume a proper design= =20 and installation) for many years to come.   The factor of revoicing comes to fore here, also. Assuming that you'll=20 need to probably revoice the organ at least partially anyway ('60s M=F6llers= =20 were notoriously "screechy" and wind starved in places, with abnormally low= =20 cutup on some ranks), so even if you did simply "maintain" the pitman=20 action, some judicious voicing work would be needed for best results. Why= =20 not just revoice the entire organ while converting to EM, and be done with= =20 it now? The big cost savings, of course, will be as ranks are added and=20 reconfigured; doing so with pitman will be quite expensive on non-tonal=20 items versus tonal. Thus, again, EM gives you more "bang for your buck"=20 over time.   Certainly, you're not "altering" a tonal masterpiece here, and planning=20 ahead should appeal to Rector's stingy nature!   ....just my 2=A2 worth.   DeserTBoB          
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Extraction - Day Two (X-posted) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 13:50:26 -0800   At 11:04 AM 1/27/2001 -0500, you wrote: >One of the ranks that will be available is a HUGE scale TUBA >!<snip> since he has seen and evaluated the rank for us. (When >he looked at it he said, "My word, that's 32' scale" !)<snip>   Hmmm...some Wurlitzer somewhere is missing its tuba, methinks! This would =   be an interesting addition, indeed! Plus, the church could forge a contract with the Coast Guard to use it for foghorn duty for the nearby boat basin!   DeserTBoB      
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Extraction - Day Two (X-posted) From: "Ray Thursby" <raythursby@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 14:24:09 -0800   Regarding the Tuba rank discussed earlier, DeserTBoB writes: "the church could forge a contract with the Coast Guard to use it for foghorn duty for the nearby boat basin!   Forgotten your history lessons already, BoB? Lighthouses were equipped = with DIAPHONES!   Ray Thursby        
(back) Subject: Re: sostenuto reversible From: "randy terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 14:30:11 -0800 (PST)   The new Schoenstien console at Grace Cathedral has a rev. piston for the swell simply marked "S."   Basically once engaged you can play a cluster and the chord will be sustained until you play a new one or turn the sustenuto off by pressing the piston again. Yes, it simply frees up both hands to play on another manual and it is not at all useful in any standard literature, but it is fun and not cost prohibitive.   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Auctions - Buy the things you want at great prices. http://auctions.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Rechesting/Extensions From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 16:42:28 -0600   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: >=20 > For the best tonal results, stick with electropneumatic action for t= he > unit stops, and place the remaining straight choruses on slider-and-pal= let > soundboards. Lyle Blackinton developed a vertical-drop electropneumati= c > pallet that has been adopted and modified by several builders and suppl= iers, > with very fine results.   That certainly is what I would do in a new organ -- and indeed it is what the firm I work with DOES do -- but so far as restoring a M=F6ller i= s concerned it would be a lot cheaper and no detriment to the instrument to releather the existing M=F6ller chests.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: A nice Experience! From: "Stu Ballinger" <wa2bss@vh.net> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 17:42:39 -0500   To Pipechatter's! On Friday evening, since the regular Organist called = & said that he wouldn't be able to play ( Before Film), @ Bardavon Theater, because he = was passing a stone, I was @ the theater, & was asked to play! Did the 1st couple of bars of J.S.Bach's Toccata in d Minor, to an appreative audiance, of about = 450 or so, & got some wonderful comments after! Wasen't nervious, & enjoyed = doing it! Had a standby organist after movie, & he played for another 10 to 15 minutes, & people crowded around! This was on January 26, on Friday1 Thanks's,.Stu Ballinger ( 1995 OHS EPB Fellow!) PS And the Film was "From Russia with Love"! Nice to see a James Bond Movie!  
(back) Subject: visiting Cincinnati From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 17:59:48 EST   Dear List- I will be on business in Cincinnati, Ohio, Monday evening Jan. = 29-Wednesday afternoon Jan. 31. What are some interesting churches and instruments to = see while I'm there. I have only been there once before, and that was to play = a concert in Dayton, so I didnt' really have time to search out the unique instruments. I will be staying in Covington, KY, so if there is anything = to see in Covington, also, please let me know. Thanks!   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Extraction - Day Two (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 15:17:55 -0800   Well, why NOT??!! Newport Harbor Lutheran has a huge new CROSS, courtesy = of Pac Bell, that doubles as a DLS antenna, AND nets them a handsome rental = every month (!).   Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 11:04 AM 1/27/2001 -0500, you wrote: > >One of the ranks that will be available is a HUGE scale TUBA > >!<snip> since he has seen and evaluated the rank for us. (When > >he looked at it he said, "My word, that's 32' scale" !)<snip> > > Hmmm...some Wurlitzer somewhere is missing its tuba, methinks! This = would > be an interesting addition, indeed! Plus, the church could forge a > contract with the Coast Guard to use it for foghorn duty for the nearby > boat basin! > > DeserTBoB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Peter's Episcopal Redwood City CA From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 15:16:29 -0800   At 03:04 PM 1/27/2001 -0500, you wrote: How does a "sostenuto" pedal work in a pipe organ?<snip>   Sustainers have been around for almost 100 years, and were followed by = such nifty appliances at pizzicato couplers and the like that showed up in Wurlitzer's "unit orchestras" and its competitors, most being heavily promoted by Robert Hope-Jones. Sustainers are also found on large "concert" organs, or should be. On Wurltizers, they are called up from a foot tab mounted on a swell shoe, but on other organs can be controlled by =   a piston and/or tab, also. Basically, a sustainer holds down whatever notes you've originally depressed until either another one is depressed or =   the coupler is retired. "Pizz" couplers, properly used on, say, a reed solo backed with a tibia, are very effective on theater organs, but have = no real "known" use in other applications. Sustainers, however, are a different story, and many is the time I wish I'd had one on a "straight" organ! One could, for example, have the sustainer hold a chord while both =   hands are therefore free to make complex hand registrational changes, or you can "cheat" with it, bopping out staccato notes in a swell solo while the sustainer gives you seemless legato. The relay logic that provided this effect was pretty simple, but took quite a bit of hardware to set up. The advent of LSI logic in solid state relays makes this formerly expensive "toy" quite reasonable now.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Extraction - Day Two (X-posted) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 15:32:34 -0800   At 02:24 PM 1/27/2001 -0800, you wrote: >Forgotten your history lessons already, BoB? Lighthouses were equipped >with DIAPHONES!<snip>   True enough, but a good high pressure tuba will make a good substitute!   Interstingly, citizen around the San Francisco bay some years ago embarked =   on a "save the foghorns" campaign to keep the old diaphone foghorns in service. The Coast Guard had been replacing them over the years with electronic oscillators driving horn loudspeakers, similar to what police cars use, but on a larger scale. Research showed that the low frequencies =   emitted by the foghorns weren't all that efficient, due to lack of directivity at those frequencies, and a frequency around 400 Hz was adopted. The old San Francisco "romantic" sound of the old "BEEEE ohhhhh" =   foghorn was fading fast, but now several are preserved and maintained for esthetic reasons.   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: virus warning From: <snyder@skyenet.net> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 19:00:16 -0500   I just discovered that I have the W32/Hybris.plug in@MM virus. It is one that send out an e-mail called Snow White and the 7 Dwarfs, the real = story. Please don't open that attachment if you get it. You would not be able to tell that the message came from me so you couldn't get it elsewhere also. Clarice Jane Snyder snyder@skyenet.net, Web pages: (Music) http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/2059  
(back) Subject: Re: visiting Cincinnati From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 16:11:34 -0800   Look into Christ Church Cathedral, if it's open again ... I'm curious what = they did to the big Holtkamp in the last remodeling/renovation of the church. = The little 3m Holtkamp in the chapel is screech city.   There really isn't MUCH in Cincinnati ... the little Koehnken & Grimm = tracker in the Immaculata in Mt. Adams that we moved and partially restored in the = '70s, but I don't know how it has fared since then.   There's a substantial NEW tracker by a good builder in a Presbyterian = church in Northside, but I forget the name of both builder and church.   Roberta Gary has a new ten-stop Juget (Canadian) in her studio at the College-Conservatory; the concert organs (3m Harrison and 3m Balcom & = Vaughn) are nothing to write home about. There's a 2m Casavant tracker in another = auditorium, but the acoustics are totally dead. She never mentions it, so I don't = think it's used much. There was some problem with Phelps' electronic combination = action.   One of the last surviving 3m Koehnken & Grimm trackers is in Plum Street = (Isaac M. Wise) Temple, across the street from St. Peter-in-Chains, the RC = cathedral. Roberta's husband Tom Miles is organist at Plum Street. St. Peter's has a dreadful Austin in wonderful acoustics.   The oldest organ in the area is the little 2m Matthias Schwabe of about = 1840 in the west gallery of the St. Mary's RC cathedral in Covington; the main = organ in the south transcept (the church is a copy of Rouen) is an undistinguished = Wicks from the '30s; the cathedral is worth seeing.   OH, there's the big Skinner in the former train station, now a museum. I = haven't heard a WORD about it since it went it ... I THINK that's the only Skinner = in Cincinnati.   There's an historic Holtkamp in St. John's RC church across the river in = Kentucky .... red brick with a central tower ... you see it from the interstate = right after you cross the river. It was the first caseless Holtkamp, or something like = that .... used to be fun to play ... don't know if they maintain it, though, = being RCs (grin).   Sadly, the Cincinnati Music Hall organ is no more ... about 50 ranks of it = are still stored in the bell tower of Old St. Mary's Church downtown, awaiting = a home (if they haven't thrown them out). Old St. Mary's (123 E. 13th St. at = Clay) is worth seeing ... the church was built in 1841; the organ is a great = blunderbuss of a 1928 3m Austin shoehorned into an 1841 Matthias Schwabe case. In = those acoustics, it sounds WONDERFUL (grin). That was my old church job.   Mother of God (Mutter Gottes) RC in Kentucky is worth seeing ... the one = with the green copper dome ... the organ is a three-manual electrocuted Koehnken & = Grimm that's perenially being announced as a re-trackerization project, but I've = never heard that it actually HAPPENED.   The old Lutheran church downtown has a restored 2m Koehnken & Grimm = tracker.   There's an elegant 3m Kilgen in St. Monica's RC on Clifton Ave. up by the University, but they're kinda funny about letting people in to play it, or = were.   There are various other interesting small trackers around and about ... = that's about it ... nothing really big, except for the Skinner.   I think there are more K & G's across the river in Kentucky, but I never = explored them.   Cheers,   Bud   RMB10@aol.com wrote:   > Dear List- > I will be on business in Cincinnati, Ohio, Monday evening Jan. = 29-Wednesday > afternoon Jan. 31. What are some interesting churches and instruments = to see > while I'm there. I have only been there once before, and that was to = play a > concert in Dayton, so I didnt' really have time to search out the unique > instruments. I will be staying in Covington, KY, so if there is = anything to > see in Covington, also, please let me know. Thanks! > > Monty Bennett > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Moller V/205 Info & Specs now online From: "Dan Miller" <dmiller@rodgers.rain.com> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 16:53:55 PDT   Hello all,   Comprehensive information and a complete stoplist, the drawknob layout, = and photos of the Calvary Grand Organ (Calvary Church, Charlotte NC) 1990 = Moller V/205 is now online from my website, launched today.   Go to www.danmillermusic.com and follow the links to "Information about = the Calvary Organ."   Best regards,   Dan   www.danmillermusic.com                    
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Rechesting/Extensions From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 16:53:38 -0800   At 04:36 PM 1/27/2001 -0500, you wrote: <For the best tonal results, stick with electropneumatic action for the unit stops, and place the remaining straight choruses on slider-and-pallet= =20 soundboards.><snip>   What on earth for? "Slippy sliders" indeed...this smacks of=20 "trackerbackerism" in but a smaller form! Regressive engineering thought=20 regarding organs is only helping shove them into the dustbin of musical=20 history by making the instrument all the more costly and inefficient. As=20 for voicing and attack concerns using EM action, this should be a=20 non-issue, at the least.   Of course, simply screwing a bunch of em assemblies onto the underside of=20 an existing toeboard is probably shoddiness exemplified, as more thought as= =20 to effect on speech should be considered. However, throwing out EM action= =20 entirely for chests equipped with leaky, inefficient sliders, prone as they= =20 are to warpage and water damage, is ludicrous, in my wholly unqualified=20 opinion. As for the lack of "expansion chambers", this is also a=20 non-issue. Bore a hole in a block of hardwood, attach it to the toe board,= =20 and thence the valve to it...there's your "expansion chamber"! As i=20 alluded to earlier, EM action has improved greatly over the years, and=20 problems with mechanical noise ("If it hums, clicks and ticks, it's gotta=20 be a Wicks!") and valve acceleration are not what they used to be. The use= =20 of herds worth animal hides in a fairly simply mechanical control apparatus= =20 in this day and age is slightly humorous at best, and a huge cost factor at= =20 worst.   I've opined for years that a lot of people in the organ field are extremely= =20 reactionary to change of any sort, good, bad or indifferent, and have a=20 vested interest in keeping an obsolete craft alive, namely, that of=20 releathering chests every forty years or so.   <A circuit for every pipe just makes for more things to go wrong><snip>   If poorly wired and using obsolete wiring products, I'd say yes, otherwise,= =20 no. if properly wired, using modern PVC insulated, color-coded cable=20 properly mounted and dressed, wiring problems should be non-existent. Even= =20 the problems associated with vermin infestation are easily gotten around=20 with the use of extruded metal shields and other methods. Over the years,= =20 I've witnessed a great many wiring techniques and philosophies in the=20 telecommunications industry, where reliability and longevity used to be=20 paramount concerns, but no longer (which is another story, but i=20 digress.). Western Electric, over a span of a hundred years, developed=20 cable systems, connection processes and wire dress standards that produced= =20 cabling and fan-out systems that were trouble-free for 80 or more=20 years. Pipe organs, on the other hand, have used some really odd and=20 obsolete methods and arrangements that always invite trouble. Cotton=20 and/or silk insulation with no semblance of color coding, indeed! And no,= =20 a single run of 30 AWG does not make a valid common return path for a whole= =20 chest!   <Over-unification really makes for bad balance in ensemble.><snip>   I don't think what Buud-by-the-Beach has in mind would be=20 "over-unification". The beauty of going to EM is, in just one area, that a= =20 stop might be duplexed or unified initially upon installation of, say, the= =20 original 11 ranks, but then can quickly and easily be converted back to=20 "straight" with simple wiring (or programming!) changes. Fooling around=20 with pitman and slider chests to accomplish this is monetarily foreboding.   <High quality hairsheep hides (as opposed to poor quality horse hides), properly treated, will last for many, many decades; Don't be scared by the= =20 uproar over the alleged long-term costs of leather in pipe organ=20 actions. Leather can and does exhibit longevity.><snip>   I, for one, can't buy this, either. Releathering is expensive,=20 labor-intensive, and its reliability is unproven until time itself=20 passes. EM action, on the other hand, IS proven to be more reliable over=20 time. Early examples of EM action, such as Wickes' "DE=AE", still work fine= =20 with but minor problems, if with design imperfections. Many of these=20 previous design problems has been addressed in current EM systems now=20 available. Also, the solid state technology now available, when properly=20 engineered and installed, is at least as reliable as old electromechanical= =20 methods, and, I'd daresay, more so.   Again, a telephony parallel. In 1948, at&t introduced to the world=20 the first "crossbar" toll switch, the #4, using state-of-the-art (for=20 then) technology and new theories of how telephone circuits could be=20 switched and accounted for. In 1964, it then introduced the world's first= =20 fully digital toll switch, the #4 ESS. early rantings were that the=20 "fussy" electronics of the ESS switches would fail far more easily that=20 good, old-fashioned electromagetics would. Studies carried out proved far= =20 otherwise. the 4ESS continues today to be the North American standard for= =20 toll telephone switching, while the old crossbar switches of various types= =20 have long been scrapped and converted into Japanese cars and other=20 stuff. Sure, there was initial reactionary opposition, and the loss of=20 jobs created a wave of discontent among the unionized telephone workers,=20 but the advantages pertaining to speed, reliability, energy efficiency and= =20 lack of maintenance costs were all too clear.   Thus it should be for pipe organs, as well. What with the ever-increasing= =20 tide of digital poseurs gnawing away at sales every year, the pipe organ=20 industry would do well to seriously consider wholesale revamping of its=20 design parameters and ideals. The current "trackerbacker" fad, as=20 exemplified by "frisky" instruments at Wellesley and Seattle, only serves=20 to make the instrument more unaccessible, not the reverse. Similarly,=20 holding on to obsolete concepts, such as pitman and slider chests, will do= =20 nothing to contain costs of both initial production and long-term=20 maintenance, thus giving the pipeless provocateur an even greater=20 cost/benefit equation. One can argue tonality until the cows come home;=20 the devil is in the non-tonal (AND financial) details.   Off my soap box for now....   DeserTBoB