PipeChat Digest #1796 - Wednesday, January 31, 2001
 
Re: 16' full length en chamades
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: 16' full length en chamades
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
RE: USC boots Barone
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
RE: USC boots Barone
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Gigasampler organ inquiry
  by <steve@open-tech.com>
here it is,My Interview
  by "DanielW Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: here it is,My Interview
  by "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk>
Rodgers 32B
  by "Ed Brown" <edbroorg@webtv.net>
Re: here it is,My Interview
  by "Gary Blevins" <gsblvns@camalott.com>
Silent Movie Mondays - Calgary / cross-post
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
RE: here it is,My Interview
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
C.E. Morey Opus List
  by "Jason Comet" <diaphone64@hotmail.com>
Re: C.E. Morey Opus List
  by <CareyOrgan@aol.com>
Re: here it is,My Interview
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: 16' full length en chamades From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 20:45:49 +0800   Yes an organ built by Kenneth Jones has been built in a Melbourne Church using a cube for the low 32 foot pipes. There is a description of the device under the heading "Polyphone reborn" on page 304 of Organists Review November 1997. Bob Elms.   JKVDP@aol.com wrote: > > In a message dated 01-01-29 20:14:03 EST, desertbob@rglobal.net writes: > John Compton, of course, parlayed this idea into > a somewhat compact = "ocarina" device known as the Compton Cube, most useful where space is = limited. > > Are any builders using this device today? Examples - - - - > Jerry > >    
(back) Subject: Re: 16' full length en chamades From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 20:48:02 +0800   Sorry Bud but the answer is "Yes". see PAGE 304 of Organists Review for Nov. 1997 and my other post on the subject.The builder is Kenneth Jones. Bob Elms..   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > Nope, and most of the cubes have been replaced with pipes or = electronics. > Holtkamp built a few, but they weren't really successful. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > JKVDP@aol.com wrote: > > > In a message dated 01-01-29 20:14:03 EST, desertbob@rglobal.net = writes: > > > > << John Compton, of course, parlayed this idea into > > a somewhat compact "ocarina" device known as the Compton Cube, most = useful > > where space is limited. > > > > Many organ wags bemoan the high cost of good lumber in making huge = scaled > > 32' pipes, when really all they need is a big BOX! Sure, big tall = pipes > > are more impressive (to some), but it's the SOUND that counts. >> > > > > Are any builders using this device today? Examples - - - - > > Jerry > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE: http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: USC boots Barone From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 08:21:56 -0600   This is the situation in enlightened Oklahoma as well. Who woulda thunk = it?   Peter   Tim (who is happy that the Little Rock classical station not only carries PipeDreams, but is also not a *bit* afraid of playing organ music regularly! Even at DRIVETIME......<gasp!>)      
(back) Subject: RE: USC boots Barone From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 09:40:45 -0500   >This is the situation in enlightened Oklahoma as well. Who woulda thunk = it? > >Peter > >Tim >(who is happy that the Little Rock classical station not only carries >PipeDreams, but is also not a *bit* afraid of playing organ music >regularly! Even at DRIVETIME......<gasp!>) > Even here in the Hudson Valley 90 miles from NYC, WMHT from Schenectady (Another 90 miles more) broadcasts it, Plugs it, and occasioanlly has = other organ stuff too.   Thank you WMHT! Thank you Carey Organ Co.!   WAMC from Albany,(the other public radio station) on the other hand, stated they would not be "blackmailed" into carrying it when I stated my contribution would depend on wether or not they would pick it up before WMHT did.   So it's WMHT for the music, and WAMC for other music, news, insights, and Garrison Keelor. They kind of balance each other out and I support both.   John V      
(back) Subject: Gigasampler organ inquiry From: <steve@open-tech.com> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 11:09:08 -0600   Caveat: this question regards sampler libraries for organs to run on Gigasampler. I prefer pipes too, but they won't fit in my studio (or my budget). Comments regarding the appropriateness of the question will only add to the noise of the list and will be ignored by me.   Does anyone here have experience using either Peter Ewers Symphonic Organ = or the Post Organ Tool Kit? I've heard the demo of the Symphonic Organ (Cavaille Coll, La Madeleine, Paris) and it's very impressive, I = especially like the 4 seconds of reverb at the end of each note. If anyone's heard = the Post Organ Tool Kit I'm curious how it compares in terms of sonic quality, registrational appropriateness to a wide variety of styles and overall impression. All constructive comments will be greatly appreciated.   Steve Chandler http://www.mp3.com/stevechandler    
(back) Subject: here it is,My Interview From: "DanielW Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 14:23:44 -0400   Danny Hopkins: A passion for the pipes   by CATHY HOLMES It=EDs not hard to get Danny Hopkins, Lockeport talking about his hobby: Be prepared to stay awhile because it=EDs not so easy to get him stopped.=   Words like diapason, dulciana, windchest, pallets, channels and ranks of   pipes flow from his lips as he describes how his pipe organ, built in 1881, works, giving credence to his statement that the pipe organ is the   =ECmost complicated instrument ever made.=EE While the jargon describing the instrument is confusing, the passion Hopkins expresses when he speaks of =ECcolours=EE and =ECtones=EE is pict= ure clear. The pipe organ can produce a very =ECgrand sound or right quiet sound that=EDs so peaceful,=EE he explains. When The Coast Guard visited last week, Danny Hopkins played the pipe organ in his small John St. living room, filling the house with the rich   sound of an old wind instrument. As he plays, his concentration is intense: he plays by ear, begins with the Doxology, flows into other pieces and ends with Silent Night. The =ECtonal beauty=EE that he talks about is there, filling the house wi= th rich, awesome sound. Mixed in with the music of the pipes and the sound of wind blowing through the channels of each pipe is the gentle thump as   he moves his feet from one base pedal to another. The organ is made up of 303 pipes: rows of hand-painted pipes are visible on one whole wall of his living room: 13 above the keyboard, six   to the left, another six base pipes on another wall and four to the right of the keyboard. =ECI sanded enough=EE of the old paint down =ECthat I got the original colours and tried to reproduce it,=EE says Hopkins, who learned his skill= s   through the internet and through old and new books on organ building. Painted in milky turquoise with stenciled burgundy flowers and gold mouths =F1 the holes where the sound comes out =F1 the pipes a= re flanked by wooden posts that Danny built to enclose the organ. In the Holy Trinity Anglican Middleton church, for which the organ was built by the New Brunswick company Paine and Wetmore, all the pipes would have been together, taking up a space about 12 feet wide. In Danny=EDs house, some pipes are in his bedroom, another rank of pipes, ye= t   to be hooked up, are high up on another wall of the living room. The highest pipe ends just inches from the living room ceiling. ONE-MAN BAND The keyboard, with 58 keys, is shorter than a piano keyboard. But that doesn=EDt mean it=EDs musical capabilities are less. According to Danny, = the   pipe organ has the potential to play more variations of sound =F1 deeper than the deepest note of a tuba, higher than the highest note of a piccolo =F1 than any other musical instrument. For that reason, and because it can imitate the sound of other instruments, it=EDs sometimes called a one-man band and the first synthesizer. Danny decided a few years ago he wanted to build a pipe organ. He began looking for organ parts and wrote first to the Organ Clearing House in New Hampshire, where between 300 and 500 pipe organs are listed on the internet. He found his organ through a Pipe Organ Builder, Letourneau in   St. Hyacinthe, Quebec. Coincidentally, the same day Letourneau received Danny=EDs letter, they received a letter from a man in Cambridge, Nova Scotia who had a pipe organ in his barn, was moving and trying to find a   home for his organ. He gave it to Danny, who hauled it home in a U-Haul in April, 1998. ONGOING RESTORATION After he brought it home, Hopkins worked for a few months putting it together; it was fit to play =ECto a certain extent by early June.=EE But= , he said, there were problems. =ECPipes spoke when they shouldn=EDt;=EE th= ere were =ECmurmers.=EE Danny=EDs solution: to take the organ all apart, take all the pallet valves off, replace the felts and leathers on every pallet. Now, there are no =ECmurmers.=EE The instrument is powered by a blower in the basement, turned on with a   switch on the organ, that provides the wind that blows through the pipes   through plastic tubing. Bellows help to maintain a constant flow of air.   Danny rhymes off name for each pipe: the eight foot open, four foot octave, eight foot melodia, two foot fifteenth, eight foot dulciama, Tenor C, and Danny plans to get a Vox Humana, which will allow the organ   to produce a soft, velvety sound. Danny, who hopes to find a job with an organ builder or restorer, says the work on his organ is not finished. He has ordered more pipes and another rank of pipes sets on high on a living room wall, ready to be connected. BIGGS FELLOWSHIP While researching on the internet, Hopkins learned about the Organ Historical Society. He was urged by organ enthusiasts on the internet to   apply for a Biggs Fellowship. Hopkins was one of four recipients of the E. Power Biggs fellowship from the Organ Historical Society. He won an all-expense trip paid for the week of August 16 to 23. Throughout the week, he saw and heard about 40 pipe organs throughout the city of greater Boston. He shows pictures on the internet of himself   working huge bellows of a reproduction of a seventeenth century organ in the Chapel of Wellesley College inWellesley. He looks like he=EDs stepping on large pieces of staging, eight feet abov= e   the ground, but that staging is part of the organ=EDs bellows. He steps o= n   the end of the bellows and descends as the bellows descend, then he steps again, pumping the bellows as he steps. He points out another organ on the internet, one that dates pre Civil War, that hadn=EDt been played in 30 years, but was restored enough to be=   played for the convention goers.                
(back) Subject: Re: here it is,My Interview From: "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 18:59:51 +0000   Danny, it's terrific, and Cathy Holmes has obviously paid close attention to what you have said. My one pre-publication correction would be her = use of the word 'base' when she means 'bass' ! Architects have trouble with =   that one, too. <g>   Well done to you both.   Cheryl     http://www.copemanhart.co.uk    
(back) Subject: Rodgers 32B From: "Ed Brown" <edbroorg@webtv.net> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 14:00:38 -0500 (EST)   What combination of amplifier and speakers are Ok for the swell and choir divisions of the above model. At present they all go through the great /pedal ampli fier giving a poor reed chorus Ed    
(back) Subject: Re: here it is,My Interview From: "Gary Blevins" <gsblvns@camalott.com> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 13:49:49 -0600   Many congrats, Daniel, I'm glad the interview went well, and after reading it, I can see that th= ey took a genuine interest in your project. I'm proud for you of your endeavors and wish you the best in completing y= our project.(maybe, when you finish your organ, you could give me some pointe= rs on getting this beast I'm working on going.) Again, kudos for you-take care, -Gary     -----Original Message----- From: DanielW Hopkins <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> To: Residence Organ List <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org>; pipechat@pipechat.or= g <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, January 30, 2001 12:30 PM Subject: here it is,My Interview     >Danny Hopkins: >A passion for the pipes > >by CATHY HOLMES >It=EDs not hard to get Danny Hopkins, Lockeport talking about his hobby: >Be prepared to stay awhile because it=EDs not so easy to get him stopped. >Words like diapason, dulciana, windchest, pallets, channels and ranks of > >pipes flow from his lips as he describes how his pipe organ, built in >1881, works, giving credence to his statement that the pipe organ is the > >=ECmost complicated instrument ever made.=EE >While the jargon describing the instrument is confusing, the passion >Hopkins expresses when he speaks of =ECcolours=EE and =ECtones=EE is pic= ture >clear. The pipe organ can produce a very =ECgrand sound or right quiet >sound that=EDs so peaceful,=EE he explains. > When The Coast Guard visited last week, Danny Hopkins played the pipe >organ in his small John St. living room, filling the house with the rich > >sound of an old wind instrument. As he plays, his concentration is >intense: he plays by ear, begins with the Doxology, flows into other >pieces and ends with Silent Night. >The =ECtonal beauty=EE that he talks about is there, filling the house w= ith >rich, awesome sound. Mixed in with the music of the pipes and the sound >of wind blowing through the channels of each pipe is the gentle thump as > >he moves his feet from one base pedal to another. >The organ is made up of 303 pipes: rows of hand-painted pipes are >visible on one whole wall of his living room: 13 above the keyboard, six > >to the left, another six base pipes on another wall and four to the >right of the keyboard. > =ECI sanded enough=EE of the old paint down =ECthat I got the original >colours and tried to reproduce it,=EE says Hopkins, who learned his skil= ls > >through the internet and through old and new books on organ building. >Painted in milky turquoise with stenciled burgundy flowers and >gold mouths =F1 the holes where the sound comes out =F1 the pipes = are >flanked by wooden posts that Danny built to enclose the organ. >In the Holy Trinity Anglican Middleton church, for which the organ was >built by the New Brunswick company Paine and Wetmore, all the pipes >would have been together, taking up a space about 12 feet wide. In >Danny=EDs house, some pipes are in his bedroom, another rank of pipes, y= et > >to be hooked up, are high up on another wall of the living room. The >highest pipe ends just inches from the living room ceiling. >ONE-MAN BAND >The keyboard, with 58 keys, is shorter than a piano keyboard. But that >doesn=EDt mean it=EDs musical capabilities are less. According to Danny,= the > >pipe organ has the potential to play more variations of sound =F1 deeper >than the deepest note of a tuba, higher than the highest note of a >piccolo =F1 than any other musical instrument. For that reason, and >because it can imitate the sound of other instruments, it=EDs sometimes >called a one-man band and the first synthesizer. >Danny decided a few years ago he wanted to build a pipe organ. He began >looking for organ parts and wrote first to the Organ Clearing House in >New Hampshire, where between 300 and 500 pipe organs are listed on the >internet. He found his organ through a Pipe Organ Builder, Letourneau in > >St. Hyacinthe, Quebec. Coincidentally, the same day Letourneau received >Danny=EDs letter, they received a letter from a man in Cambridge, Nova >Scotia who had a pipe organ in his barn, was moving and trying to find a > >home for his organ. He gave it to Danny, who hauled it home in a U-Haul >in April, 1998. >ONGOING RESTORATION > After he brought it home, Hopkins worked for a few months putting it >together; it was fit to play =ECto a certain extent by early June.=EE Bu= t, >he said, there were problems. =ECPipes spoke when they shouldn=EDt;=EE t= here >were =ECmurmers.=EE >Danny=EDs solution: to take the organ all apart, take all the pallet >valves off, replace the felts and leathers on every pallet. Now, there >are no =ECmurmers.=EE >The instrument is powered by a blower in the basement, turned on with a > >switch on the organ, that provides the wind that blows through the pipes > >through plastic tubing. Bellows help to maintain a constant flow of air. > >Danny rhymes off name for each pipe: the eight foot open, four foot >octave, eight foot melodia, two foot fifteenth, eight foot dulciama, >Tenor C, and Danny plans to get a Vox Humana, which will allow the organ > >to produce a soft, velvety sound. >Danny, who hopes to find a job with an organ builder or restorer, says >the work on his organ is not finished. He has ordered more pipes and >another rank of pipes sets on high on a living room wall, ready to be >connected. >BIGGS FELLOWSHIP >While researching on the internet, Hopkins learned about the Organ >Historical Society. He was urged by organ enthusiasts on the internet to > >apply for a Biggs Fellowship. Hopkins was one of four recipients of the >E. Power Biggs fellowship from the Organ Historical Society. He won an >all-expense trip paid for the week of August 16 to 23. >Throughout the week, he saw and heard about 40 pipe organs throughout >the city of greater Boston. He shows pictures on the internet of himself > >working huge bellows of a reproduction of a seventeenth century organ >in the Chapel of Wellesley College inWellesley. >He looks like he=EDs stepping on large pieces of staging, eight feet abo= ve > >the ground, but that staging is part of the organ=EDs bellows. He steps = on > >the end of the bellows and descends as the bellows descend, then he >steps again, pumping the bellows as he steps. >He points out another organ on the internet, one that dates pre Civil >War, that hadn=EDt been played in 30 years, but was restored enough to b= e >played for the convention goers. > > > > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Silent Movie Mondays - Calgary / cross-post From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 16:34:36 EST   For immediate release   Legends of the Silver Screen return to Calgary this February   Calgary, January 22 - Calgary International Organ Foundation proudly announces the return of their popular "Silent Movie Mondays" at The = Uptown, 612-8th Ave. S.W., beginning February 5.   Each Monday in February, a silent film classic will be brought to life through the masterful accompaniment of world-renowned theatre organist = Dennis James. "It's always such a pleasure to return to Calgary to perform on the =   Chinook Theatre Organ", says James, " for it truly replicates the finest design of the pipe organs housed in the grand motion picture palaces of = the 1920's."   Calgary audiences will once again thrill to some of the finest silent = films ever made, and to silent screen legends who, though they have become household names, are seldom seen in a theatre setting with authentic = musical accompaniment.   Feb.5, 7:00PM - The Thief of Bagdad (1924) Douglas Fairbanks Sr. earns his reputation as a rogue and a lady's man in this romantic adventure featuring flying carpets and giant monsters circa 1924! In addition to the starring role, Fairbanks co-wrote the screenplay = and was the film's producer.   Feb.12, 7:00PM - My Best Girl (1927) Enjoy Mary Pickford at the height of her career in this charming romantic comedy that pairs her on-screen with Buddy Rogers, a leading man who later =   became her husband.   Feb 19, 2:00PM, Family Day Matinee - Peter Pan (1924) The story of little boy who wouldn't grow up has stood the test of time. = This time-honoured classic features a colourful cast of characters who will delight and astound audiences. Starring Betty Bronson.   Feb.26, 7:00PM - Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928) Arguably the finest silent film clown of all time, Buster Keaton was in = top form for this frantically funny film. Keaton was known for his outstanding =   talent as a stuntman, and "Steamboat Bill, Jr." is an extraordinary = example of his skills.   "It has been most gratifying to see the ever-increasing attendance at the Calgary silent film series" continues James," and to bring a touch of 'the =   way it used to be' to the city's burgeoning diverse cultural programming".   Tickets for Silent Movie Mondays may be purchased in advance by calling Calgary International Organ Foundation at (403) 543-5115, or at The Uptown =   box office ( 628-8th Ave. S.W.) forty-five minutes prior to performances. Adult tickets are $10, students and seniors $8, children under 12 $5.   "Silent Movie Mondays" is a presentation of the Calgary International = Organ Foundation.     For more information, please contact: Twyla Laakso Manager, Marketing & Communications Calgary International Organ Foundation Ph: (403) 543-6280 E-mail: twyla@ciof.com  
(back) Subject: RE: here it is,My Interview From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 15:57:37 -0600   Architects often use "alter" for "altar" too.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Cheryl C Hart [mailto:info@copemanhart.co.uk] Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2001 1:00 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: here it is,My Interview     Danny, it's terrific, and Cathy Holmes has obviously paid close attention to what you have said. My one pre-publication correction would be her = use of the word 'base' when she means 'bass' ! Architects have trouble with =   that one, too. <g>   Well done to you both.   Cheryl     http://www.copemanhart.co.uk     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: C.E. Morey Opus List From: "Jason Comet" <diaphone64@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 18:22:24 -0500   I remember someone has the C.E.Morey Opus List.   Could that person please contact me.   Thank you, Jason Comet _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Re: C.E. Morey Opus List From: <CareyOrgan@aol.com> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 19:24:34 EST   Jason: Let me know what you are looking for. I think I have a Morey List. = Paul C.  
(back) Subject: Re: here it is,My Interview From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 00:25:00 EST     --part1_8f.643e9a0.27a8fbac_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/30/01 9:58:33 PM !!!First Boot!!!, pstorandt@okcu.edu =   writes:     > Architects often use "alter" for "altar" too. > > Peter > >   So do little old ladies! I remember going into the sacristy of a parish church and seeing a pair of those large, ferocious-looking florist shears lying on the counter. In very bold print on the rubber handle was the marking: Alter Guild. Now these ladies take their work seriously!   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_8f.643e9a0.27a8fbac_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#80ffff"><FONT = COLOR=3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D4 FACE=3D"Toujours" LANG=3D"0"><I>In a message = dated 1/30/01 9:58:33 PM !!!First Boot!!!, pstorandt@okcu.edu <BR>writes: <BR> <BR></FONT></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></I> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Architects often = use "alter" for "altar" too. <BR> <BR>Peter <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D4 FACE=3D"Toujours" = LANG=3D"0"><I> <BR>So do little old ladies! &nbsp;&nbsp;I remember going into the = sacristy of a parish <BR>church and seeing a pair of those large, ferocious-looking florist = shears <BR>lying on the counter. &nbsp;&nbsp;In very bold print on the rubber = handle was the &nbsp; <BR>marking: &nbsp;&nbsp;Alter Guild. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Now these = ladies take their work seriously! <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D5 FAMILY=3D"DECORATIVE" = FACE=3D"Tempus Sans ITC" LANG=3D"0">Bruce &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ = &nbsp;</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D"Calisto MT" LANG=3D"0">Cremona502@cs.com</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D5 FAMILY=3D"DECORATIVE" FACE=3D"Tempus Sans ITC" = LANG=3D"0"> &nbsp; <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D"Calisto MT" LANG=3D"0">with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest = ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</I></FONT></HTML>   --part1_8f.643e9a0.27a8fbac_boundary--