PipeChat Digest #2184 - Sunday, July 1, 2001
 
Allen Protege vs. Renaissance
  by "Dan Gawthrop" <Gawthrop@dunstanhouse.com>
Re: Allen Protoge'
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: Allen Protege vs. Renaissance
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
OHS 2001 in North Carolina (longish)
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: strange preludes
  by "Robert Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net>
JS Bach & Arnstadt organ on DVD Video
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
 

(back) Subject: Allen Protege vs. Renaissance From: "Dan Gawthrop" <Gawthrop@dunstanhouse.com> Date: Sat, 30 Jun 2001 08:42:26 -0400   > The AP 2 and 3 are NOT Renaissance to my knowledge > but the rest of the AP's are renaissance.   Quite right. I'm afraid my earlier description may have been misleading. Once you get to the C6 and larger models the tone generation is exactly = the same as in the Renaissance models. Economies have been in the area of console controls (i.e., stop controls are spring loaded rocker tabs with = LED indicators rather than moving stop tabs actuated by the combination = system, fewer pistons, fewer memories, things like that). If sound is your primary concern and budget must be considered, an AP model (with external audio) will, I guarantee it, blow you away! If a bit more money is available, the traditional tabs that move (or even drawknobs) are lovely to look at and = the added console accessories may be necessities if you have multiple = organists or an otherwise demanding music program.   > MY Analog has three 100 Watt amps and the usual > complement of huge boxes, two reeds, one flute gyro, > one diapason and two bass; one for each division > with four 15" speakers in each. These are all on > the far wall of my living room. I would love to > hear a mid range AP attached to that amplification > system.   I think you would be quite disappointed. The digital tone generation in = the Allen Renaissance system creates waveforms which conventional loudspeakers can only approximate. Transients in particular (an important component of reed sounds) are simply too demanding. Allen has recently spent = considerable time and resources developing a new speaker system (called "Herald") which makes an enormous difference. A side-by-side comparison which I heard recently was utterly convincing: I would never put anything else on a Renaissance organ.   Placement is another factor; see below.   >use external speakers (which are not especially costly) > -- place them carefully up high and at a distance,   Up high and at a distance is great, but the secret to proper placement, especially for the new Herald speakers, is to put them either into a chamber, or in some other configuration which allows the sound to bounce from at least one (two or more is better) hard surface(s) before reaching any listener. In other words they should NEVER be allowed to face or point directly at a listener; listeners should hear reflected sound only. In = some cases this may mean putting the cabinets on their backs so the the sound reflects from the ceiling or into a chamber meant for pipes, facing the = back of the chamber (which may seem counter-intuitive, but believe me, it makes = a world of difference!).     > and make sure you have the instrument voiced > to the room in which it speaks.   Well, sure. I mean, of course. You'd do that with pipes, wouldn't you? And Allen's Sound Matrix system gives you the same stop-by-stop note-by-note control as you'd have with pipes. What's more, you don't have to climb around in a hot dusty chamber and suspend yourself over a six rank mixture to do it; it's all controlled from a laptop and you make your voicing decisions while seated at the console (which is where you want the right blend and balance to occur anyway).   >These little organs are marvels.   I couldn't agree more. I used to be a pipe purist fanatic. The Allen Renaissance has given me a humility transplant (at least on this = subject... :-)   Dan Gawthrop Gawthrop@DunstanHouse.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Protoge' From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Jun 2001 12:10:09 EDT   Dan Gawthrop asks:   >Did the instrument you >played have the shortened pedal sharps?<<   Yes it did, Dan. I have since learned that the Allen was selected for its =   price!! This unit is the smallest Allen built, according to the funeral home, which spend 4.3-million dollars on construction of the facility and just a few thousand for the organ. I once thought that only churches used this logic but - live and learn, = right?   Again, let me say that I am NOT tossing rocks at Allen. Just that I was = not aware that they built "itsy-bitsy" consoles like these. For a funeral = home and the limited amount of usage (and for the purpose intended) the organ = is adequate.   Jim P.  
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Protege vs. Renaissance From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 30 Jun 2001 12:25:29 -0700 (PDT)   Yeah, but how long do they last?   --- Dan Gawthrop <Gawthrop@dunstanhouse.com> wrote: > > The AP 2 and 3 are NOT Renaissance to my knowledge > > but the rest of the AP's are renaissance. > > Quite right. I'm afraid my earlier description may > have been misleading. > Once you get to the C6 and larger models the tone > generation is exactly the > same as in the Renaissance models. Economies have > been in the area of > console controls (i.e., stop controls are spring > loaded rocker tabs with LED > indicators rather than moving stop tabs actuated by > the combination system, > fewer pistons, fewer memories, things like that). If > sound is your primary > concern and budget must be considered, an AP model > (with external audio) > will, I guarantee it, blow you away! If a bit more > money is available, the > traditional tabs that move (or even drawknobs) are > lovely to look at and the > added console accessories may be necessities if you > have multiple organists > or an otherwise demanding music program. > > > MY Analog has three 100 Watt amps and the usual > > complement of huge boxes, two reeds, one flute > gyro, > > one diapason and two bass; one for each division > > with four 15" speakers in each. These are all on > > the far wall of my living room. I would love to > > hear a mid range AP attached to that amplification > > system. > > I think you would be quite disappointed. The digital > tone generation in the > Allen Renaissance system creates waveforms which > conventional loudspeakers > can only approximate. Transients in particular (an > important component of > reed sounds) are simply too demanding. Allen has > recently spent considerable > time and resources developing a new speaker system > (called "Herald") which > makes an enormous difference. A side-by-side > comparison which I heard > recently was utterly convincing: I would never put > anything else on a > Renaissance organ. > > Placement is another factor; see below. > > >use external speakers (which are not especially > costly) > > -- place them carefully up high and at a distance, > > Up high and at a distance is great, but the secret > to proper placement, > especially for the new Herald speakers, is to put > them either into a > chamber, or in some other configuration which allows > the sound to bounce > from at least one (two or more is better) hard > surface(s) before reaching > any listener. In other words they should NEVER be > allowed to face or point > directly at a listener; listeners should hear > reflected sound only. In some > cases this may mean putting the cabinets on their > backs so the the sound > reflects from the ceiling or into a chamber meant > for pipes, facing the back > of the chamber (which may seem counter-intuitive, > but believe me, it makes a > world of difference!). > > > > and make sure you have the instrument voiced > > to the room in which it speaks. > > Well, sure. I mean, of course. You'd do that with > pipes, wouldn't you? And > Allen's Sound Matrix system gives you the same > stop-by-stop note-by-note > control as you'd have with pipes. What's more, you > don't have to climb > around in a hot dusty chamber and suspend yourself > over a six rank mixture > to do it; it's all controlled from a laptop and you > make your voicing > decisions while seated at the console (which is > where you want the right > blend and balance to occur anyway). > > >These little organs are marvels. > > I couldn't agree more. I used to be a pipe purist > fanatic. The Allen > Renaissance has given me a humility transplant (at > least on this subject... > :-) > > Dan Gawthrop > Gawthrop@DunstanHouse.com > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: OHS 2001 in North Carolina (longish) From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Jun 2001 16:52:01 EDT   Now that I've had time to catch up on my sleep after several days = exploring the hills and dales of North Carolina and Virginia, I thought I might = share a few impressions of this august event, particularly since this was my first =   OHS convention.   If my count is correct, we visited 34 organs in 27 churches and chapels = and 3 residences. I have no idea how many miles we traversed from the base camp outside Winston-Salem, but it must have been significant. I took along my trusty camcorder and am in the process of compiling a video scrapbook of = the convention.   Several things stand out. The program and logistics were all worked out = very carefully and we kept moving and moving and moving and stuck pretty close = to the printed schedule most of the time. The folks who planned the event and =   all those who managed things on-site deserve a rousing bravo! I've had = many years of experience as a staff member working at conventions for trade associations, so it is all the more amazing to me that a group of = dedicated volunteers managed to do such a fantastic job. They moved us from venue to =   venue and managed to keep us well fed for what must have seemed like an eternity to them.   I'd been told ahead of time to expect a friendly crowd, and that was certainly an apt description. With the exception of the AGO regional in Pittsburgh, I've never encountered such a cordial and welcoming group at = any organ-related event. There were folks from all over the US as well as Australia (and perhaps others I'm forgetting). Young and not-so-young, singles, couples, organists, organ aficionados, famous names and not-so-famous names. A remarkable group of kindred spirits who made the = time fly and made everyone feel welcome.   The instruments ran the gamut from a couple little 1-manuals sans pedals = to some rather humongous instruments. Some old, some nearly new. And the = variety of music performed was just about as great. The hymn singing was a major highlight -- I suspect some of these churches have not seen such large = crowds in a long time and many may never have heard anything like the robust = singing of this enthusiastic group.   I suspect each person's reaction to a specific program is probably colored = by his/her preferences. Given mine, the highlights in the large organ = department would be Bruce Stevens' opening recital on the Letourneau in Greensboro, = the Muellers at St. Paul's in Winston-Salem, and Ken Cowan's dazzling recital = on the Aeolian in Duke Chapel.Stewart Foster was a last-minute subsitute on Monday evening and played up a storm on a large instrument that was not = one of my favorites, but he turned in a virtuoso performance and didn't seem = to mind when some people (myself included!) at first confused him with = Stewart Forster (the brilliant virtuoso from Australia). And some of the others on =   the very tiny instruments were memorable too, perhaps too numerous to = mention any particular ones for fear of leaving someone out.   I'd visited Biltmore House last Christmas, but this offered a chance to = see the organ up close and hear a bit more of what it could do than just = playing carols. Hearing the Ride of the Valkyries made it difficult to mention it = is an instrument of rather modest proportions. The Aeolian at Reynolda House (complete with working player mechanism) was a treat, as was the house itself. Chinqua-Penn plantation is suffering from wear, but the Skinner = organ was made playable for us and it served up an interesting program despite = the sweltering heat and lack of air conditioning.   I, like many others, was amazed at how loooooooouuuuuuud some of the = featured instruments were and wondered how they could possibly prove useful on = Sunday morning, but what do I know.   The handbook and the convention issue of The Tracker provided excellent = still photos, so I opted to take along the camcorder. Even the raw footage on = first viewing provides a wonderful recollection of that whirlwind adventure. I = hope to edit it down to something of manageable length to fit on a single VHS cassette. I may be able to make copies available for the cost of a blank = tape and postage; if interested, e-mail me privately. I must stress that these = are the equivalent of "home movies" and in no way on the level of professional =   videos.   Again, a resounding thanks to all the committees, the performers, the volunteers, the heroic crew that managed to resurrect some of the = instruments for us to hear them, and to all the friendly folks who made this = first-timer feel welcome.   If you've never attended an OHS convention, I can't recommend it too = highly.   David (DudelK) Krohne (The eponymous Lhasa Apso Dudel reports that he had a nice time at = sleep-away camp but is happy to be back home!)  
(back) Subject: Re: strange preludes From: "Robert Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net> Date: Sat, 30 Jun 2001 20:32:22 -0400   Gary Black wrote: > > HI list, try these on for size! I have played the Bethena Waltz by > Scott Joplin and the theme song from The Ghost and MR. Chicken for a > postlude. Those Methodists have no clue! ( and the sad part is that I > am a member of that denomination too)! Try this just for fun. > Choose a prelude that starts out softly( good background music for > those who are talking in the pews before church about card parties > etc.). Then play louder for awhile so that they can talk louder and > then bring everything quickly to a rapid ppp. > What fun! I heard one Sunday when i did that, that a lady was saying. > ( "I didn't think they would ever leave last night after we lost at > bridge. She is an awful player.") And everyone else heard too! Oh > my! Of course the other lady was there too within ear shot, boy was > joys and concerns fun that day! lol. And as our minister says. > "Lettuce spray"). Have fun list. Gary > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org Cool!!...............................Jane H.  
(back) Subject: JS Bach & Arnstadt organ on DVD Video From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Sat, 30 Jun 2001 22:49:40 -0400   A new DVD video imported by OHS from Germanay features a performance of the Toccata and Fugue in D minor by J. S. Bach on the reconstructed Wender Organ in the Bach Church at Arnstadt. The first of its kind, this 90-minute DVD brings cutting-edge video and sound quality to a video program of music by J. S. Bach. Of great importance to the organ world is the very first recording of the newly reconstructed Wender organ at the Bach Church in Arnstadt, where J. S. B. worked for two years. Also included are excellent performances of works for chorus and small orchestra with organ, solo harpsichord, and small string ensemble. There is also a 20-minute program on the life and work of J. S. Bach, spoken in English, with video of important places in his life. Sites of the concerts and of importance in Bach's life include Arnstadt, M=FChlhausen, Weimar Castle, K=F6then Castle, Leipzig St. Thomas Church = and the Old Bourse.   Alas, this video is not available on VHS videotape. It is only produced as a DVD. But, the quality made possible by this new medium is superb.   It is on the opening page of the OHS Catalog http://www.ohscatalog.org   Bill