PipeChat Digest #2206 - Saturday, July 7, 2001
 
Re: well, I guess it WON'T go away (grin)
  by "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net>
RE: 'BLACK BEAUTY' TOURING ORGAN
  by "Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net>
Products of their time (was Carnegie Hall organ specs, etc.)
  by "Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net>
Re: analog vs digital
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Products of their time (was Carnegie Hall organ specs, etc.)
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: information needed
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Speaker Decay (was: Re: Allen Renaissance)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Rodgers Organ at Carnegie Hall
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: stoplists and the literature
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
:)
  by <Victorgan@aol.com>
A Second Life for Historic Pipe Organs: today's NY Times article (X-post)
  by "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com>
Chant From Solesmes in Detroit
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: stoplists and the literature
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: well, I guess it WON'T go away (grin) From: "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2001 07:01:42 -0500   So let me see, Bud, those 100-200 people cannot enjoy a big organ sound at an affordable price   Jim H   ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: "pipechat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, July 06, 2001 1:18 PM Subject: well, I guess it WON'T go away (grin)     > I have a life (grin). > > I think *some* organists have done as much as anyone to create the > MARKET for digital substitutes ... like Stainer's carriage horse, > they're always wishing for another stop. > > seating 100-200 and find a > large three or four manual organ, pipe OR electronic. MOST of the > literature can be played on 20 stops over two manuals and pedals, though > that involves a fair amount of piston-pushing if you're playing the big > French stuff with no Positif manual. > > I WON'T go the route of a 5-stop all-unenclosed one-manual organ with > pull-down pedal, because I have to accompany too many things in too many > different styles, and I also have to be able to see over the console > because I'm organist/choirmaster; but 15-20 stops will certainly be > adequate for us, and we have THE most complex liturgy in the Western > Church (grin), and a comparatively ambitious choir program. > > Cheers, > > Bud-by-the-sticky-humid-rainy-NASTY-Beach > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: RE: 'BLACK BEAUTY' TOURING ORGAN From: "Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2001 08:16:16 -0500   For me, the Black Beauty is important because it was the first 'real' org= an I ever heard. Ted Alan Worth played a concert, sponsored by Community Concerts, at my high school in the mid-60's. That concert, alone, transformed my ears and my life.   Although I have never sought to play or to endorse playing in "the grand style," Ted Worth and Black Beauty always will have a special place in my life.   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea Fort Lauderdale, FL       > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Carlo Pietroniro > Sent: Friday, July 06, 2001 11:08 PM > To: Rodgers Organs; Pipe Chat; Organ Chat; Electronic Organs; Church > Organist > Subject: 'BLACK BEAUTY' TOURING ORGAN > > > 'BLACK BEAUTY' TOURING ORGAN > Rodgers c.1967 > > > This touring organ was known as 'Black Beauty' because of the ebony fin= ish > of its console. It was most famous as the instrument used by Virgil Fox= in > his 'Heavy Organ' concerts at Fillmore East, NYC in 1970, and at Carneg= ie > Hall in 1972 and 1973. > There were 134 speakers in 13 cabinets, with 1000 watts of audio > power. The > total weight of the instrument was two tons. > > It is now in private ownership in the USA. > > > > GREAT > 16 Quintaton > 8 Principal > 8 Bourdon > 8 Gemshorn > 4 Octave > 4 Flute > 2 2/3 Twelfth > 2 Fifteenth > 1 1/3 Nineteenth > 1 Principal > IV Fourniture > III Cymbal > 8 Cor Anglais > Tremulant (affecting 8ft. and 4ft. stops) > Great to Great 16 8off 4 > Swell to Great 16 8 4 > Choir to Great 16 8 4 > > SWELL > 16 Rohrgedeckt > 8 Geigen Principal > 8 Rohrfl=F6te > 8 Salicional > 8 Voix Celeste > 8 Flauto Dolce > 8 Flute Celeste > 4 Prestant > 4 Nachthorn > 2 2/3 Rohr Nasat > 2 Waldfl=F6te > V Plein Jeu > 16 Fagotto > 8 Trompette > 8 Hautbois > 8 Vox Humana mf > 8 Vox Humana mp > 4 Clarion > Tremulant > Swell to Swell 16 8ff 4 > > CHOIR > 16 Flute Conique > 8 Nachthorn > 8 Quintade (with chiff) > 8 Viola > 8 Viola Celeste > 8 Erz=E4hler > 8 Erz=E4hler Celeste > 4 Principal > 4 Lieblich Flute > 4 Quintadena (with chiff) > 2 2/3 Nazard > 2 Blockfl=F6te > 1 3/5 Tierce > 1 1/3 Larigot > 1 Siffl=F6te > 8 Cromorne > 8 Schalmei > 8 Trompette Harmonique > Tremulant > Harp 8 > Harp 4 > Carillon (Flemish tuning) > Choir to Choir 16 8off 4 > Swell to Choir 16 8 4 > > PEDAL > 32 Contra Principal > 32 Untersatz > 16 Principal > 16 Bourdon > 16 Lieblich Gedeckt > 16 Dulciana > 8 Octave > 8 Bourdon > 8 Still Gedeckt > 8 Gemshorn > 4 Choralbass > 4 Nachthorn > III Mixture > 32 Contra Bombarde > 16 Bombarde > 16 Fagotto > 8 Trumpet > 8 Krummhorn > 4 Clarion > 4 Schalmei > Tremulant (affecting 4ft. stops only) > Great to Pedal 8 4 > Swell to Pedal 8 4 > Choir to Pedal 8 4 > > Cymbelstern > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Products of their time (was Carnegie Hall organ specs, etc.) From: "Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2001 08:21:06 -0500   Hi, Y'all:   Seb said: > Guess it was a product of its times and circumstances.>   I think there is a sooooo much truth in that sentence. So many organs (revered or hated) today are products of the times and circumstances. Our organ is a good example. It is big and laden with mixtures and thin-scaled principals. Obviously, our organ (installed in 1973) is a product of the thinking of the day.   A couple of years ago, when Fancesco Ruffatti heard the organ again for = the first time in 25 years, he said to me (I had just played the principal chorus on each manual), "We don't build organs like that anymore." But I'm thankful for this organ and the fact there is a warm, 2-second (there = used to be 3) reverberation time for this big ol' organ to sing!   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea Fort Lauderdale    
(back) Subject: Re: analog vs digital From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2001 08:47:42 EDT   In a message dated 7/5/01 6:20:10 PM EST, organist@total.net writes:   > > I know digital organs use samples from real pipes to get their = remarkable > sound, but how did these early electronic organs work. Was there = sampling > back then too? > NO, there were pitch generators and reactive (or capacitive) filter = networks that created a specific "Waveform" for each stop. some organs, like the Saville used a set of generators and waveform filters per stop. Some other =   organs used a single set of generators (97 notes in total) to generate the =   pitches and these were sent thru the voice filters, re-combined in a mixer =   circuit and amplified thru common amps/speakers, some used multiple sets = of pitch generators so as to have some tuneable celeste stops, and some used = 12 "master" oscillators (called the top-note generator) and frequency = dividers to derive the rest of the pitches, then the pitches are sent thru voice waveform filters , remixed and amplified.   That is of course a NUTSHELL description, in real life there is more to = the electronics than just that, but hopefully you get the basic concept.   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Products of their time (was Carnegie Hall organ specs, etc.) From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2001 09:16:56 EDT   In a message dated 7/7/01 7:25:24 AM EST, organdok@safari.net writes:   > "We don't build organs like that anymore." But I'm > thankful for this organ and the fact there is a warm, 2-second (there = used > to be 3) reverberation time for this big ol' organ to sing! > > Yours, > > Darryl by the Sea > Fort Lauderdale Here is a goood point...that sometimes the acoustic of the room will = prove helpful in the musical results of the organ building and finishing = process. A live, reverberant acoustic helps take the 'edge' off of a thinly scaled organ.   Another example, closer to (my) home... a local college had built a 3-50something rank pipe organ (circa 1973). The organ is installed in the school's theatre/concert hall. During the summer when the organ was being installed/finish voiced, all the seating had been removed, and the oak = floor of the room refinished, thus, the room was highly reverberant. Later that summer the re-covered (theatre style) seats were returned to the room and installed. the revereation period went from about 2 seconds to >zilch<. the organ now had a VERY harsh effect on the ears (and still does). A = couple of years ago I heard the organ in the (once again) empty, seatless room = and the change of character was quite noteable.   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Re: information needed From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 07 Jul 2001 08:11:26 -0500     --------------BE95BE5B032DB5B6F4216A7E Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I think it is Waterbury, not Waterford. You might try calling Alan McNeely.   John Speller   PEsch8@aol.com wrote:   > Does anyone know of the McNeely pipe organ > company in Waterford, Ct. They are > not listed in the phone book. > Thanks in advance, > Paul Eschenauer   --------------BE95BE5B032DB5B6F4216A7E Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML> I think it is Waterbury, not Waterford.&nbsp; You might try calling Alan McNeely. <P>John Speller <P>PEsch8@aol.com wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE><B><FONT FACE=3D"Times New Roman"><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000080"><FONT SIZE=3D+0>Does anyone know of the McNeely pipe organ company in Waterford, Ct. They = are</FONT></FONT></FONT></B> <BR><B><FONT FACE=3D"Times New Roman"><FONT COLOR=3D"#000080"><FONT = SIZE=3D+0>not listed in the phone book.</FONT></FONT></FONT></B> <BR><B><FONT FACE=3D"Times New Roman"><FONT COLOR=3D"#000080"><FONT = SIZE=3D+0>Thanks in advance,</FONT></FONT></FONT></B> <BR><B><FONT FACE=3D"Times New Roman"><FONT COLOR=3D"#000080"><FONT = SIZE=3D+0>Paul Eschenauer</FONT></FONT></FONT></B></BLOCKQUOTE> </HTML>   --------------BE95BE5B032DB5B6F4216A7E--    
(back) Subject: Re: Speaker Decay (was: Re: Allen Renaissance) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 07 Jul 2001 08:30:08 -0500   Brent Johnson wrote:   > Recently we worked on an instrument with a couple Walker Technical 32' = stops > that sounded horrible. Upon opening the speaker cabinets, the foam = around > the edge of the speaker had deteriorated, and the noise was the cone of = the > speaker hitting the metal frame. These were only about 10 years old, so > we're wondering how many more of these we will encounter in coming = years...   This happens with speakers. It has happened with the one's on my stereo system. Getting them reconed is very cheap so it shouldn't be too much of = a problem.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Rodgers Organ at Carnegie Hall From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Sat, 07 Jul 2001 09:11:57 -0500   At 10:45 PM 7/6/01 -0400, you wrote: > > Tim and all > > Yes you are wrong. Virgil's first touring Rodgers named "Black Beauty" = was a > > custom 3 manual. Both the later resident Carnegie Hall instrument and = the > sister touring instrument named "Royal V" were 5 manual instruments. = The 4 > manual that Virgil toured with was the even later Allen console. > > Bill       Good morning, all --   Thanks Bill and everyone, for refreshing my memory. I guess I *do* need = to read the Fox book again! <g>   Thanks also, Carlo, for posting the stoplists and info about these organs. =   Quite interesting indeed.   Cheers --   Tim  
(back) Subject: Re: stoplists and the literature From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2001 10:20:50 -0400   Bud.......   if you really wanna talk about an organ with TOO many stops, just think about the Moller in the cadet chapel at West Point. Now there's an organ with so many stops, it's beyond silly!!!   c.p.    
(back) Subject: :) From: <Victorgan@aol.com> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2001 10:35:16 EDT   hey there!   good to see you online!   vic  
(back) Subject: A Second Life for Historic Pipe Organs: today's NY Times article (X-post) From: "Pat Maimone" <patmai@juno.com> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2001 11:09:18 -0400   Dear Pipechatters, On a beautiful Saturday morning in the Hudson Valley, it was a pleasure to see this article mentioned in Today's Arts Headlines from the NY Times.. >>A Second Life for Historic Pipe Organs >By ROBIN POGREBIN > >Organ Clearinghouse, a group devoted to perserving historic pipe >organs, rescued an organ built in 1885 from a Brooklyn church that >will soon be torn down. > http://www.nytimes.com/2001/07/07/arts/07ORGA.html?ex=3D995517157&ei=3D1&en= =3D2 fc 4546d13e815d1 Vaughn Watson, Dean of the Suffolk, LI, chapter of the AGO, is mentioned as the one who alerted Jim Bishop of the OCH. Vaughn is a former member of the Central Hudson Valley AGO chapter. He was present at the AGO's Region II convention in Binghamton, NY June 24-27. Pat Maimone Post Chapel III/57 hybrid West Point, NY patmai@juno.com who is very thankful that she has no weddings today.. since last week's started 46 minutes late... ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.  
(back) Subject: Chant From Solesmes in Detroit From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2001 11:25:26 EDT     --part1_93.cda51cd.287883e6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   We were treated to a week long seminar of Chant pedagogy and performance = Jun=3D e=3D20 18th through the 22nd. The guest clinician was Dom Daniel Saulnier, = O.S.B.=3D20 and his assistant Mr. Sarunas Viscokis from the Abbey of St. Pierre,=3D20 Solesmes, France.   The program was the brain child of Dr. Norah Duncan, Organist-Choirmaster = at=3D =3D20 the Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Detroit and organ professor = a=3D t=3D20 Wayne State University. This program was a part of the Cathedral = Cultural=3D20 Series with assistance from the Archdiocese of Detroit. Monsignor = Robinson,=3D =3D20 Rector of the Cathedral, was also most gracious in hosting us for the = week.   The topics covered were the history of Gregorian chant, the = liturgical=3D20 context of Gregorian composition, Gregorian modality, rhythmical analysis = of=3D =3D20 Gregorian composition and Medieval sources of Gregorian repertoire. = The=3D20 seminar culminated on Friday evening when the participants and = congregation=3D20 (who were invited for the event) gathered in the vast nave of the = Cathedral=3D20 to sing the office of Evening Prayer. I must admit that I was quite moved = b=3D y=3D20 the ceremony hearing the chant resonant in those wonderful acoustics = and=3D20 being sung as it was intended to be sung.   Fr. Saulnier and Mr. Viscokis stopped by the National Shrine while they = were=3D =3D20 here and made a pilgrimage. It was at Fr. Saulnier's invitation that I = was=3D20 asked to provide a prelude (Mors et Resurrectio by Langlais), = processional=3D20 (improvisation on the hymn of the day: "Auctor beate saeculi") and=3D20 recessional (Grand Choeur in B flat by DuBois). At the Evening = Prayer=3D20 Service the singers (choirs) were arranged antiphonally, just as the = Monks=3D20 and Nuns in the monastaries and convents have sung through the centuries. = =3D20 The spaciousness and acoustics of Blessed Sacrament were truly an=3D20 inspirational space in which to sing prayer to God, especially as the sun = se=3D t=3D20 and the evening light drifted through the beautiful stained glass windows.   It was so very rewarding to learn how chant was begun and has evolved, how = i=3D t=3D20 is interpreted and supposed to be sung. Many participants in the = program=3D20 (130 total) asked wonderful questions throughout the course that Fr. = Saulnie=3D r=3D20 answered with patience and insight. Though he and Mr. Viscokis are = French=3D20 their English is quite beautifully spoken and very easy to understand. = Seein=3D g=3D20 him teach us further drives home the point that American music education = run=3D s=3D20 a sorry second to the European countries and that we can certainly learn = muc=3D h=3D20 from them in the ways of fine arts, music pedagogy and appreciation. It = was=3D =3D20 sad that the number of clergy in attendance at the Evening Prayer = Service=3D20 could be counted on one hand. Additionally, there were many parish = musician=3D s=3D20 that should have been there that were not and that could have learned so = ver=3D y=3D20 much for their own music ministries.   Fr. Saulnier went into great depth teaching how Gregorian chant is the = proud=3D =3D20 musical heritage of the church and how it is to be taught and fostered. = He=3D20 drove the point home that there is no reason for churches not to be = singing=3D20 chant, but that it must be taught seriously and properly and not = haphazardly=3D ..=3D20 It's beauty and elegance make any worship service more meaningful = and=3D20 transcendent. This is especially true with the work the Monks of = Solesmes=3D20 have done in bringing the chant into the Church after the Second = Vatican=3D20 Council. It can and should be use more than it has been and this = seminar=3D20 really lit the spark in those of us who were lucky enough to be there = and=3D20 experience this rich musical treasure of our faith.   I can honestly say that everyone there was sad at the end of the = Evening=3D20 Prayer service and wished that there were more of the program. Judging = by=3D20 the enthusiasm of all who witnessed the program it is quite evident that Dr.=3D =3D20 Duncan could host another such program and the attendance would probably = far=3D =3D20 surpass even this first course.=3D20   Thank you Dr. Duncan, and thank you to Dom Saulnier and Mr. Viscokis for = a=3D20 week that I personally will never forget. I am certain that many of = the=3D20 music directors in attendance will use what we learned in bringing the = rich=3D20 treasure trove of Gregorian Chant to our congregations!   SCOTT F. FOPPIANO, Principal Organist and Director of Music and Liturgy THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI (Geo. Kilgen & Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) =3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens, fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D     --part1_93.cda51cd.287883e6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>We were treated to = a week=3D long seminar of Chant pedagogy and performance June=3D20 <BR>18th through the 22nd. &nbsp;The guest clinician was Dom Daniel = Saulnier=3D , O.S.B.=3D20 <BR>and his assistant Mr. Sarunas Viscokis from the Abbey of St. = Pierre,=3D20 <BR>Solesmes, France. <BR> <BR>The program was the brain child of Dr. Norah Duncan, = Organist-Choirmaste=3D r at=3D20 <BR>the Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Detroit and organ = profess=3D or at=3D20 <BR>Wayne State University. &nbsp;This program was a part of the Cathedral = C=3D ultural=3D20 <BR>Series with assistance from the Archdiocese of Detroit. = &nbsp;Monsignor=3D20=3D Robinson,=3D20 <BR>Rector of the Cathedral, was also most gracious in hosting us for the = we=3D ek. <BR> <BR>The topics covered were the history of Gregorian chant, the = liturgical=3D20 <BR>context of Gregorian composition, Gregorian modality, rhythmical = analysi=3D s of=3D20 <BR>Gregorian composition and Medieval sources of Gregorian repertoire. = &nbs=3D p;The=3D20 <BR>seminar culminated on Friday evening when the participants and = congregat=3D ion=3D20 <BR>(who were invited for the event) gathered in the vast nave of the = Cathed=3D ral=3D20 <BR>to sing the office of Evening Prayer. &nbsp;I must admit that I was = quit=3D e moved by=3D20 <BR>the ceremony hearing the chant resonant in those wonderful acoustics = and=3D =3D20 <BR>being sung as it was intended to be sung. <BR> <BR>Fr. Saulnier and Mr. Viscokis stopped by the National Shrine while = they=3D20=3D were=3D20 <BR>here and made a pilgrimage. &nbsp;It was at Fr. Saulnier's invitation = th=3D at I was=3D20 <BR>asked to provide a prelude (Mors et Resurrectio by Langlais), = procession=3D al=3D20 <BR>(improvisation on the hymn of the day: "Auctor beate saeculi") = and=3D20 <BR>recessional (Grand Choeur in B flat by DuBois). &nbsp;At the Evening = Pra=3D yer=3D20 <BR>Service the singers (choirs) were arranged antiphonally, just as the = Mon=3D ks=3D20 <BR>and Nuns in the monastaries and convents have sung through the = centuries=3D .. &nbsp; <BR>The spaciousness and acoustics of Blessed Sacrament were truly an=3D20 <BR>inspirational space in which to sing prayer to God, especially as the = su=3D n set=3D20 <BR>and the evening light drifted through the beautiful stained glass = window=3D s. <BR> <BR>It was so very rewarding to learn how chant was begun and has evolved, = h=3D ow it=3D20 <BR>is interpreted and supposed to be sung. &nbsp;Many participants in the = p=3D rogram=3D20 <BR>(130 total) asked wonderful questions throughout the course that Fr. = Sau=3D lnier=3D20 <BR>answered with patience and insight. &nbsp;Though he and Mr. Viscokis = are=3D French=3D20 <BR>their English is quite beautifully spoken and very easy to understand. = S=3D eeing=3D20 <BR>him teach us further drives home the point that American music = education=3D runs=3D20 <BR>a sorry second to the European countries and that we can certainly = learn=3D much=3D20 <BR>from them in the ways of fine arts, music pedagogy and appreciation. = &nb=3D sp;It was=3D20 <BR>sad that the number of clergy in attendance at the Evening Prayer = Servic=3D e=3D20 <BR>could be counted on one hand. &nbsp;Additionally, there were many parish=3D musicians=3D20 <BR>that should have been there that were not and that could have learned = so=3D very=3D20 <BR>much for their own music ministries. <BR> <BR>Fr. Saulnier went into great depth teaching how Gregorian chant is the = p=3D roud=3D20 <BR>musical heritage of the church and how it is to be taught and = fostered.=3D20=3D &nbsp;He=3D20 <BR>drove the point home that there is no reason for churches not to be = sing=3D ing=3D20 <BR>chant, but that it must be taught seriously and properly and not = haphaza=3D rdly.=3D20 <BR>&nbsp;It's beauty and elegance make any worship service more = meaningful=3D20=3D and=3D20 <BR>transcendent. &nbsp;This is especially true with the work the Monks of = S=3D olesmes=3D20 <BR>have done in bringing the chant into the Church after the Second = Vatican=3D =3D20 <BR>Council. &nbsp;It can and should be use more than it has been and this = s=3D eminar=3D20 <BR>really lit the spark in those of us who were lucky enough to be there = an=3D d=3D20 <BR>experience this rich musical treasure of our faith. <BR> <BR>I can honestly say that everyone there was sad at the end of the = Evening=3D =3D20 <BR>Prayer service and wished that there were more of the program. = &nbsp;Jud=3D ging by=3D20 <BR>the enthusiasm of all who witnessed the program it is quite evident = that=3D Dr.=3D20 <BR>Duncan could host another such program and the attendance would = probably=3D far=3D20 <BR>surpass even this first course.=3D20 <BR> <BR>Thank you Dr. Duncan, and thank you to Dom Saulnier and Mr. Viscokis = for=3D a=3D20 <BR>week that I personally will never forget. &nbsp;I am certain that many = o=3D f the=3D20 <BR>music directors in attendance will use what we learned in bringing the = r=3D ich=3D20 <BR>treasure trove of Gregorian Chant to our congregations! <BR> <BR><B>SCOTT F. FOPPIANO</B>, Principal Organist and Director of Music and = L=3D iturgy <BR>THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI <BR>(Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) <BR><I>=3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat = dicens, <BR>fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D</I> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_93.cda51cd.287883e6_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: stoplists and the literature From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 07 Jul 2001 09:20:20 -0700   Not only that, Carlo, but it was built up over the years from bits and pieces from all over the country that were collected by the long-time organist, and I'd be VERY surprised if there's ever been a major voicing effort to unite all the pieces. At least Wanamaker's, Atlantic City, the Tabernacle in Salt Lake, the Baptist Moller (in Memphis?) and Riverside, etc. were DESIGNED as integral instruments ... they're all huge, but = there's a discernible overall tonal concept behind the design. Wanamaker's is = still a recognizeable American Classic organ, albeit on steroids; so is Atlantic City to a certain extent.The Cadet Chapel is a REAL mongrel (grin).   Riverside is actually very logical and easy to play, and the sound is much improved now that they re-arranged the pedal pipes in the chambers for better tonal egress, and did a good deal of work on the acoustics of the room, which used to be quite dead for its size.   But my original statement still stands ... aside from being able to hunt = for JUST the right flute, string, or solo reed on an organ like Riverside, and having a choice of German or French principal choruses and mixtures, the whole SELDOM gets used ... at Riverside (at least), the full organ is = BEYOND overpowering, and was even before the last work was done to improve the sound.   Widor was presiding at the largest organ in France when he wrote his = music; St. Sulpice is 102 stops (two were added in Widor's honor when he retired = in the 1930s ... Mutin built a metal 16' Principal and a metal 8' Octave, = both for the Pedal) ... so there's certainly nothing in the French romantic literature that requires MORE than that.   I'm less familiar with German romantic organs ... there were/are some = heroic ones ... Passau, Riga, etc., but they still don't approach the size of Wanamaker's or Atlantic City.   Baroque organs, of course, were considerably smaller ... the four-manual Schnitger at Zwolle is probably the largest surviving one, and it has CONSIDERABLY less than 100 stops. So do the modern Beckeraths at Trinity Lutheran (Cleveland), St. Paul's Cathedral (Pittsburgh), and your own five-manual in the Oratory, though they're not strict baroque copies.   Cheers,   Bud       Carlo Pietroniro wrote:   > Bud....... > > if you really wanna talk about an organ with TOO many stops, just think > about the Moller in the cadet chapel at West Point. Now there's an organ > with so many stops, it's beyond silly!!! > > c.p. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org