PipeChat Digest #2225 - Thursday, July 12, 2001
 
Re: people-by-the-sea
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
RE: St. George's West, Edinburgh - Alfred Hollins
  by "Andrew Caskie" <caskie@totalise.co.uk>
Re: people-by-the-sea
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@home.com>
Anecdote - for haters of Quintadenas, Pommers and the like.
  by <LLWheels@aol.com>
tone colors
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
Re: Rectors reply (was TWO sung)
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@home.com>
"Neo Baroque" Organd was Re: Anecdote - for haters of Quintadenas, Pommer
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
program Sunday
  by "Josh Edwards" <fbcorganist@att.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: people-by-the-sea From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2001 09:27:59 -0700   >In a message dated 7/11/01 11:16:24 AM Eastern Daylight Time, >jovanderlee@vassar.edu writes: > ><< I now live in NY but > with those kind of appelations I sure don't feel welcome any more! >> > >Sorry John, I should have written "present company excepted". > >Cheers: > >Alan B Of course you know that was just tongue in cheek? ;-)   John --  
(back) Subject: RE: St. George's West, Edinburgh - Alfred Hollins From: "Andrew Caskie" <caskie@totalise.co.uk> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2001 16:20:00 +0100   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0008_01C10AEE.7FD8E6A0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   As far as I'm aware the building has changed little, save the insertion of = a partition part-way below the back gallery to expand the vestibule space. = The organ was done over by Rushworth & Dreaper in 1984, removing a 16' Double Diapason on the Great, now leaving no 16' whatsoever on the manuals. The wide orchestral palette was baroqueified as you report - mutations galore. Thus it doesn't bear much resemblance to the organ Hollins played. But I think the building is largely unchanged. There was a great tradition in = STGW of preaching - during the mid c20th the church was regularly packed.   As I type, I think considerable alterations to the building are about to occur - I walked past recently to find a notice saying that all services would be in the hall for a few months, and a huge banner proclaiming "Our church is transforming". But I don't know quite what the work entails!   Hope this is of interest   Andrew -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of ManderUSA@aol.com Sent: 12 July 2001 02:48 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: St. George's West, Edinburgh - Alfred Hollins     In a message dated 7/11/2001 7:01:53 PM Eastern Daylight Time, caskie@totalise.co.uk writes:       Yes, he was organist of St. George's West in Edinburgh for about 40 years, but although living in Scotland, was English, being born in Hull.     Do you know if the interior of the church looks now anything like it did in Hollins's days? I accompanied an American choir in the morning Eucharist at St. Mary's Cathedral about a decade ago, and with a couple of other Hollins fans, walked over to St. George's. A few people still lingered after = their service, and the building was open, so we wandered in. It really was not an inspiring sight, heavily upholstered and not a bit of an acoustic to be found. We did not get to hear the organ, which David Liddle, who knows = the instrument well, said had been just a bit Baroqueified by the then = current organist. Any thoughts about how it might have looked during Hollins's tenure? I seemed to recall his waxing enthusiastic about the move north = in his autobiography "A Blind Musician Looks Back," but a good part of that had to do with the great preacher of the day. He was looking forward to inspiring sermons - how many organists would/could say that?   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0008_01C10AEE.7FD8E6A0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D130041415-12072001>As far=3D20 as I'm aware the building&nbsp;has changed little, save the insertion of = =3D a=3D20 partition part-way below the back gallery to expand the vestibule space. = =3D The=3D20 organ was done over by Rushworth &amp; Dreaper in 1984, removing a 16' =3D Double=3D20 Diapason on the Great, now leaving no 16' whatsoever on the manuals. The = =3D wide=3D20 orchestral palette was baroqueified as you report - mutations galore. =3D Thus it=3D20 doesn't bear much resemblance to the organ Hollins played. But I think =3D the=3D20 building is largely unchanged. There was a great tradition in STGW of =3D preaching=3D20 - during the mid c20th the church was regularly packed. =3D </SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D130041415-12072001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D130041415-12072001>As I=3D20 type, I think considerable alterations to the building are about to =3D occur - I=3D20 walked past recently to find a notice saying that all services would be = =3D in the=3D20 hall for a few months, and a huge banner proclaiming "Our church is=3D20 transforming". But I don't know quite what the work entails!=3D20 </SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D130041415-12072001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D130041415-12072001>Hope=3D20 this is of interest</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D130041415-12072001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D130041415-12072001>Andrew</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE> <DIV align=3D3Dleft class=3D3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3D3Dltr><FONT =3D face=3D3DTahoma=3D20 size=3D3D2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> =3D pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]<B>On Behalf Of=3D20 </B>ManderUSA@aol.com<BR><B>Sent:</B> 12 July 2001 02:48<BR><B>To:</B> = =3D   pipechat@pipechat.org<BR><B>Subject:</B> St. George's West, Edinburgh = =3D - Alfred=3D20 Hollins<BR><BR></DIV></FONT><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT =3D size=3D3D2>In a=3D20 message dated 7/11/2001 7:01:53 PM Eastern Daylight Time,=3D20 <BR>caskie@totalise.co.uk writes: <BR><BR><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"=3D20 TYPE=3D3D"CITE">Yes, he was organist of St. George's West in Edinburgh = =3D for about=3D20 40 years, <BR>but although living in Scotland, was English, being =3D born in=3D20 Hull.</FONT><FONT color=3D3D#000000 face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 = size=3D3D3=3D20 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR></FONT><FONT color=3D3D#000000 = =3D face=3D3DArial=3D20 lang=3D3D0 size=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><BR>Do you know if the = interior =3D of the church=3D20 looks now anything like it did in <BR>Hollins's days? I accompanied an = =3D   American choir in the morning Eucharist at <BR>St. Mary's Cathedral =3D about a=3D20 decade ago, and with a couple of other Hollins <BR>fans, walked over =3D to St.=3D20 George's. A few people still lingered after their <BR>service, and the = =3D   building was open, so we wandered in. It really was not an =3D <BR>inspiring=3D20 sight, heavily upholstered and not a bit of an acoustic to be =3D <BR>found. We=3D20 did not get to hear the organ, which David Liddle, who knows the=3D20 <BR>instrument well, said had been just a bit Baroqueified by the then = =3D current=3D20 <BR>organist. Any thoughts about how it might have looked during =3D Hollins's=3D20 <BR>tenure? I seemed to recall his waxing enthusiastic about the move = =3D north in=3D20 <BR>his autobiography "A Blind Musician Looks Back," but a good part =3D of that=3D20 had <BR>to do with the great preacher of the day. He was looking =3D forward to=3D20 inspiring <BR>sermons - how many organists would/could say that?=3D20 <BR><BR>Cheers, <BR><BR>Malcolm Wechsler =3D <BR>www.mander-organs.com</FONT>=3D20 </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0008_01C10AEE.7FD8E6A0--    
(back) Subject: Re: people-by-the-sea From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@home.com> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2001 11:42:16 -0500   From my organbench in St. Andrew's, I look out over Sturgeon Creek, a wonderful view.   Russ-by-the-creek       On 7/10/01 5:06 PM, Stephen Barker wrote:   > Just a silly late night posting really... > > Seeing several of you are "by-the-sea" I was wondering how close you = need to > be? I live 6 miles (aproximately 10km) from the Sea? Is that close = enough? > Can I be Steve-by-the-sea? I need this information to sleep well = tonight... > > Steve-in-Canterbury-which-may-be-near-the-sea... >    
(back) Subject: Anecdote - for haters of Quintadenas, Pommers and the like. From: <LLWheels@aol.com> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2001 12:58:42 EDT     --part1_a5.18546c0c.287f3142_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   Anecdote - for haters of Quintadenas, Pommers and the like.     Many, many years ago when I was a student of Philip Gehring at = Valparaiso=3D20 University, I was called upon to accompany the University Choir = performing=3D20 Brittens Rejoice in the Lamb for the Sunday Eucharist. The University = Choir=3D20 was, at that time, the premier performing group at the university and = was=3D20 directed by Dr. Larry Fleming; a fine, fine musician, but extremely = precise=3D20 and demanding of everyone; he was feared! I had rehearsed with the = choir=3D20 using the piano several times, but got only one rehearsal in the Chapel = of=3D20 the Resurrection on one of Herman Schlickers largest instruments (since = then=3D =3D20 wonderfully restored and added-to by Lynn Dobson). I had not accompanied = an=3D y=3D20 choir before on this instrument, so I guessed at registrations for = the=3D20 rehearsal and then adjusted my registrations after the rehearsal with = the=3D20 choir. There had been no major problems at the rehearsal, so I = didn=3DE2=3D80=3D =3D99t expect=3D20 any registrational surprises. Then came Sunday morning=3DE2=3D80=3DA6..   Most of you probably know that this piece begins with a middle c on the = orga=3D n=3D20 with the choir coming in all on middle c at the end of the first measure. = I=3D20 had decided to play that middle c on a 16 in the pedal, freeing up both = hand=3D s=3D20 for the manual parts - I didnt have to play it that way, it just = seemed=3D20 convenient. Unfortunately, the 16-foot stop which seemed balanced to me = was=3D20 the Gedecktpommer. Fleming gave the downbeat, and my foot went down on = middl=3D e=3D20 c. Three beats later, the singers entered singing a perfect fifth: c and = g!=3D20 Fleming looked at me questioningly and stopped the choir (previously=3D20 unheard-of in a performance). He gave the downbeat once again; same = response=3D =3D20 from the choir. I could see Fleming getting red and the flames shooting = from=3D =3D20 his eyes as he stopped the choir once again in the first measure. I = was=3D20 trying to remember how far away the gallery door was to determine if I = could=3D =3D20 make it out before he could intercept me, and at the same timed trying to = be=3D =3D20 as invisible as possible. He looked at me again and held up one finger = and=3D20 said two words: ONE NOTE! I still didn=3DE2=3D80=3D99t realize what was = happening=3D20=3D so I=3D20 guessed that for some reason, the choir could not hear the note, so my = hand=3D20 reached out desperately for something louder and hit upon the 8-foot = octave=3D20=3D -=3D20 much too loud for the beginning of this piece, but when the downbeat came = th=3D e=3D20 third time, I made sure the choir heard me. The piece then proceeded=3D20 uneventfully (I am told by friends - I don=3DE2=3D80=3D99t remember = playing any of=3D it after=3D20 that)   The Gedacktpommer sounded to me, as an organist, as a single colorful = pitch,=3D =3D20 but as for the non-organists in the choir, (many of them = instrumentalists,)=3D20 many of them heard the harmonic as a separate pitch and took that = one.=3D20 Fleming never mentioned it to me, and, yes, I did occasionally accompany = the=3D =3D20 choir after that, but I dont think I ever drew the 16-foot Gedecktpommer = for=3D =3D20 anything =3DE2=3D80=3D93 EVER!     Larry L. Wheelock aka Larry-by-the-lake (Michigan, that is) Organist Conductor Composer Kenwood United Methodist Church Milwaukee, WI Austin Organ Co. Opus 1628, 1928 III/55       --part1_a5.18546c0c.287f3142_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Univers" LANG=3D3D"0">Anecdote - for haters of Quintadenas, Pommers = and th=3D e like. <BR> <BR> <BR>Many, many years ago when I was a student of Philip Gehring at = Valparais=3D o=3D20 <BR>University, I was called upon to accompany the University Choir = performi=3D ng=3D20 <BR>Brittens Rejoice in the Lamb for the Sunday Eucharist. The University Ch=3D oir=3D20 <BR>was, at that time, the premier performing group at the university and = wa=3D s=3D20 <BR>directed by Dr. Larry Fleming; a fine, fine musician, but extremely = prec=3D ise=3D20 <BR>and demanding of everyone; he was feared! &nbsp;I had rehearsed with = the=3D choir=3D20 <BR>using the piano several times, but got only one rehearsal in the = Chapel=3D20=3D of=3D20 <BR>the Resurrection on one of Herman Schlickers largest instruments = (since=3D20=3D then=3D20 <BR>wonderfully restored and added-to by Lynn Dobson). &nbsp;I had not = accom=3D panied any=3D20 <BR>choir before on this instrument, so I guessed at registrations for = the=3D20 <BR>rehearsal and then adjusted my registrations after the rehearsal with = th=3D e=3D20 <BR>choir. There had been no major problems at the rehearsal, so I = didn=3DE2=3D =3D80=3D99t expect=3D20 <BR>any registrational surprises. Then came Sunday = morning=3DE2=3D80=3DA6.. <BR> <BR>Most of you probably know that this piece begins with a middle c on = the=3D20=3D organ=3D20 <BR>with the choir coming in all on middle c at the end of the first = measure=3D .. I=3D20 <BR>had decided to play that middle c on a 16 in the pedal, freeing up = both=3D20=3D hands=3D20 <BR>for the manual parts - I didnt have to play it that way, it just = seemed=3D20 <BR>convenient. Unfortunately, the 16-foot stop which seemed balanced to = me=3D20=3D was=3D20 <BR>the Gedecktpommer. Fleming gave the downbeat, and my foot went down on = m=3D iddle=3D20 <BR>c. Three beats later, the singers entered singing a perfect fifth: c = and=3D g!=3D20 <BR>Fleming looked at me questioningly and stopped the choir = (previously=3D20 <BR>unheard-of in a performance). He gave the downbeat once again; same = resp=3D onse=3D20 <BR>from the choir. I could see Fleming getting red and the flames = shooting=3D20=3D from=3D20 <BR>his eyes as he stopped the choir once again in the first measure. I = was=3D20 <BR>trying to remember how far away the gallery door was to determine if I = c=3D ould=3D20 <BR>make it out before he could intercept me, and at the same timed trying = t=3D o be=3D20 <BR>as invisible as possible. He looked at me again and held up one finger = a=3D nd=3D20 <BR>said two words: ONE NOTE! I still didn=3DE2=3D80=3D99t realize what = was happen=3D ing so I=3D20 <BR>guessed that for some reason, the choir could not hear the note, so my = h=3D and=3D20 <BR>reached out desperately for something louder and hit upon the 8-foot = oct=3D ave -=3D20 <BR>much too loud for the beginning of this piece, but when the downbeat = cam=3D e the=3D20 <BR>third time, I made sure the choir heard me. The piece then = proceeded=3D20 <BR>uneventfully (I am told by friends - I don=3DE2=3D80=3D99t remember = playing an=3D y of it after=3D20 <BR>that) <BR> <BR>The Gedacktpommer sounded to me, as an organist, as a single colorful = pi=3D tch,=3D20 <BR>but as for the non-organists in the choir, (many of them = instrumentalist=3D s,)=3D20 <BR>many of them heard the harmonic as a separate pitch and took that = one.=3D20 <BR>Fleming never mentioned it to me, and, yes, I did occasionally = accompany=3D the=3D20 <BR>choir after that, but I dont think I ever drew the 16-foot = Gedecktpommer=3D for=3D20 <BR>anything =3DE2=3D80=3D93 EVER! <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3D3 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"Un=3D ivers" LANG=3D3D"0">Larry L. Wheelock aka Larry-by-the-lake (Michigan, = that is=3D ) <BR>Organist <BR>Conductor <BR>Composer <BR>Kenwood United Methodist Church <BR>Milwaukee, WI <BR>Austin Organ Co. Opus 1628, 1928 III/55</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#000000" S=3D IZE=3D3D3 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Bimini" LANG=3D3D"0"> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#ff0000" SIZE=3D3D3 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"Bi=3D mini" LANG=3D3D"0"> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_a5.18546c0c.287f3142_boundary--  
(back) Subject: tone colors From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2001 10:56:15 -0700 (PDT)   I realize I am late on this topic, or, sort of ignored it, but the generic = Quinadena 8 that S & K or someone added to the great of Grace Cathedral in place of the 1st = Diapason is an absolutely wonderful sound. I agree that the original stop should be replaced or = recreated, but the QD in those acoustics is wonderful.   Our QD at St. Peter's was quite charming in our acoustics, too, however, = in such a small organ we opted to replace it with something more all-purpose.   I've heard ugly and beautiful examples of all the stops discussed, and if = a stop is musical - be it a Regal, chiffy Gedackt, or a Chamade, that is what makes or breaks = them. It is unfortunate that very often such characterist, colorful stops are not give tretment in = construction or voicing to make them musical and thus the "iniquities" make them less than lovely!   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Randy Terry Minister of Music, Organist & Choirmaster The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California www.stpetersrwc.org   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Rectors reply (was TWO sung) From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@home.com> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2001 13:20:14 -0500   At St. Andrew's Woodhaven, we have three services each Sunday because of both the number in the congregation and the presence of three distinct = types of people in the parish. We are a BCP parish (the 1662 rite for you non-Canadians) with rare ventures into modern liturgies.   Every Sunday, the 8:30 service is a said Eucharist, no music whatsoever. = It is a short, snappy service attended essentially by the loners in the congregation. These folks sit scattered throughout the church; there is no feeling that they need or want community.   9:30 services alternate week on week between Eucharist and Matins. No = choir. Organ, 4 abbreviated hymns (time constraints) and always a sung liturgy, either Merbecke at Eucharist or complete Versicles, Responses and = Canticles in Anglican Chant at Matins. Psalms are said, usually responsively. The congregation perform their sung parts amazingly well, with both accuracy = and reverence. The people at this service are the "brunchers" - they want an hour-long service, then off to brunch in social groups, leaving most of their Sunday free.   11:00 services are either Choral Eucharist (first, third and fifth Sundays plus special occasions) or Matins (others) with choir. Liturgies, psalms = and canticles are sung; hymns are led by the choir; anthems and special = "during communion" presentations are done almost every week. A more formal = service, attended by those who have children in the Sunday School, or like the = choir, or prefer a more formal ritual and who do not mind the usually hour-and-a-half length of service.   All in all, this format is the most successful I have ever worked with in almost fifty years in nine different parishes (from boy chorister to now). And oddly for a choral director, our 9:30 service, sung without choir, is particularly satisfying.   Cheers, Russ-by-the-creek   On 7/11/01 7:19 AM, BridgewaterUMC Director of Music wrote:   > He defended his position that by saying that all masses should be "sung" = and > that the only proper way to do that was with a choir. This in spite of = the > fact that a very large and vocal group wished for a much simpler early > Eucharist.    
(back) Subject: "Neo Baroque" Organd was Re: Anecdote - for haters of Quintadenas, Pommers From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2001 14:45:26 EDT     --part1_112.18efe11.287f4a46_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   Larry's anecdote about the Gedecktpommer on the Valparaiso Schlicker = was=3D20 entertaining and, unfortunately, true. I have had similar occurrences = with=3D20 soloists when I have had to play such instruments. To me, the name of = the=3D20 builder alone would have sent up a tremendous red flag right away to = begin=3D20 with.   Having been to Europe a number of times, I have played the organs of=3D20 Silbermann, Schnitger and other miscellaneous builders around the = continent.=3D =3D20 Then I look at instruments imported to the United States such as the = Busch=3D20 Reisinger Museum (to name one) and others built by Schlicker, = Holtkamp,=3D20 Phelps and others. The Schnitgers, Silbermanns and other organs I = played=3D20 (especially in Germany and Holland) were by no means thin, breathy, = overly=3D20 percussive (chiffy) nor did they have mixtures that deafen humans and = attrac=3D t=3D20 canines from the surrounding countryside. We played organs both in = vast,=3D20 resonant Cathedrals and also in smaller, drier parish churches.   Where did people like Phelps (who was by far the worst, at least from what = I=3D =3D20 have seen), Holtkamp, Schlicker, Dirk Flentrop and their champion, E. = Sower=3D20 Figgs, come off building organs and telling builders to build organs in = that=3D =3D20 manner (thin, breathy, overly chiffy and with incredibly low pressures)???   I have never understood this and doubt that anyone can give a full and = true=3D20 explanation as to why the American instruments of the 50-80's of = those=3D20 builders were designed as such. Yes, I understand that people at one = time=3D20 wanted to get away from overly thick diapasons and tubby choruses called = for=3D =3D20 in the Wagner and Lemare transcriptions, and it is interesting that some = of=3D20 the American builders, while "reforming" their craft to an extent, did NOT = g=3D o=3D20 as far off the deep end as some of the others. I specifically = applaud=3D20 Austin's work during the 60's and 70's because they remained, in my = opinion,=3D =3D20 more "middle of the road" than did many others. Now I am not saying = that=3D20 any of the builders I named built bad organs, I am merely inquiring as to = th=3D e=3D20 origin of the "neo baroque" movement that plagued the Unites Stated = so=3D20 severely and brought about the demise of so many fine Kilgens, = Whitelegg=3D20 Mollers, H.V. Willis Wicks, Kimballs, E.M. Skinners, 1920-1950's = Casavants=3D20 and other quasi-symphonic organs that should still be around today.   In closing, I would like to say that I find it VEEEEEERY interesting = (and=3D20 quite amusing) that scales are once again broadening, orchestral and=3D20 imitative voices are finding their ways BACK into specifications, = diapasons=3D20 are fattening up again (thank GOD!) and people are finally saying = "what=3D20 happened to the warm and rich tones?"   SCOTT F. FOPPIANO, Principal Organist and Director of Music and Liturgy THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI (Geo. Kilgen & Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) =3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens, fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D     --part1_112.18efe11.287f4a46_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">Larry's anecdote about = the Ged=3D ecktpommer on the Valparaiso Schlicker was=3D20 <BR>entertaining and, unfortunately, true. &nbsp;I have had similar = occurren=3D ces with=3D20 <BR>soloists when I have had to play such instruments. &nbsp;To me, the = name=3D of the=3D20 <BR>builder alone would have sent up a tremendous red flag right away to = beg=3D in=3D20 <BR>with. <BR> <BR>Having been to Europe a number of times, I have played the organs = of=3D20 <BR>Silbermann, Schnitger and other miscellaneous builders around the = contin=3D ent. &nbsp; <BR>Then I look at instruments imported to the United States such as the Bus=3D ch=3D20 <BR>Reisinger Museum (to name one) and others built by Schlicker, = Holtkamp,=3D20 <BR>Phelps and others. &nbsp;The Schnitgers, Silbermanns and other organs = I=3D20=3D played=3D20 <BR>(especially in Germany and Holland) were by no means thin, breathy, = over=3D ly=3D20 <BR>percussive (chiffy) nor did they have mixtures that deafen humans and = at=3D tract=3D20 <BR>canines from the surrounding countryside. &nbsp;We played organs both = in=3D vast,=3D20 <BR>resonant Cathedrals and also in smaller, drier parish churches. <BR> <BR>Where did people like Phelps (who was by far the worst, at least from = wh=3D at I=3D20 <BR>have seen), Holtkamp, Schlicker, Dirk Flentrop and their champion, E. = So=3D wer=3D20 <BR>Figgs, come off building organs and telling builders to build organs = in=3D20=3D that=3D20 <BR>manner (thin, breathy, overly chiffy and with incredibly low = pressures)?=3D ?? <BR> <BR>I have never understood this and doubt that anyone can give a full and = t=3D rue=3D20 <BR>explanation as to why the American instruments of the 50-80's of = those=3D20 <BR>builders were designed as such. &nbsp;Yes, I understand that people at = o=3D ne time=3D20 <BR>wanted to get away from overly thick diapasons and tubby choruses = called=3D for=3D20 <BR>in the Wagner and Lemare transcriptions, and it is interesting that = some=3D of=3D20 <BR>the American builders, while "reforming" their craft to an extent, did = N=3D OT go=3D20 <BR>as far off the deep end as some of the others. &nbsp;I specifically = appl=3D aud=3D20 <BR>Austin's work during the 60's and 70's because they remained, in my = opin=3D ion,=3D20 <BR>more "middle of the road" than did many others. &nbsp;&nbsp;Now I am = not=3D saying that=3D20 <BR>any of the builders I named built bad organs, I am merely inquiring as = t=3D o the=3D20 <BR>origin of the "neo baroque" movement that plagued the Unites Stated = so=3D20 <BR>severely and brought about the demise of so many fine Kilgens, = &nbsp;<U>=3D Whitelegg</U>=3D20 <BR>Mollers, <U>H.V. Willis</U> Wicks, Kimballs, E.M. Skinners, = 1920-1950's=3D20=3D Casavants=3D20 <BR>and other quasi-symphonic organs that should still be around today. <BR> <BR>In closing, I would like to say that I find it VEEEEEERY interesting = (an=3D d=3D20 <BR>quite amusing) that scales are once again broadening, orchestral = and=3D20 <BR>imitative voices are finding their ways BACK into specifications, = diapas=3D ons=3D20 <BR>are fattening up again (thank GOD!) and people are finally saying = "what=3D20 <BR>happened to the warm and rich tones?" <BR> <BR><B>SCOTT F. FOPPIANO</B>, Principal Organist and Director of Music and = L=3D iturgy <BR>THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI <BR>(Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) <BR><I>=3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat = dicens, <BR>fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D</I> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_112.18efe11.287f4a46_boundary--  
(back) Subject: program Sunday From: "Josh Edwards" <fbcorganist@att.net> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2001 16:34:21 -0400   I'm presenting a program Sunday at First Baptist Church in Galax, Virginia. Just wanted to get your all's ideas on the program that will be performed.... what do you all think??     1.. Festive Trumpet Tune - David German 2.. Fugue in G minor, S. 578 - Johann S. Bach 3.. Ave Verum Corpus - Wolfgang A. Mozart 4.. God of Grace - Paul Manz 5.. What A Friend We Have in Jesus - James Pethel 6.. Litanies from Trois Pi=CBces pour Grand Orgue - Jehan Alain 7.. Trio No. 1 - Josef Rheinberger 8.. Fantasia on Lobe Den Herren - James and Stan Pethel (assisted by Marietta Carmichael) 9.. Suite Gothique, Op. 25 - Leon Boellmann   Please remember that I am only completed my sophomore year in college... = do you think this is advanced enough for that year in school? What are your all's ideas?   Thanks,   Josh Edwards Organist, First Baptist Church, Seymour, TN