PipeChat Digest #2238 - Monday, July 16, 2001
 
Re: "Neo Baroque" Organ (a trifle long)
  by <mts@intergrafix.net>
Position open, Long Island, NY
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Lemmens' Fanfare - Last 4 measures??
  by "diaphone 64" <diaphone64@hotmail.com>
Re: 6 Feet Under
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: 6 Feet Under
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: SFU, cont. yet again
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Console $
  by "Robert Hullem" <rhullem@hotmail.com>
Sheet music from Canada's past available online
  by "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com>
Fees etc.
  by "cjs" <musicjs2001@yahoo.com>
Re: Six Feet Under, cont.
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
the movie
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Frey, Liszt "Ad nos" at Crystal Cathedral
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: Ad nos
  by "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Reasons for Sub Fees
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: the movie
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: the movie
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re:  Tom Hazelton
  by <RJAYWILL@aol.com>
Tom Hazelton's #
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: "Neo Baroque" Organ (a trifle long) From: <mts@intergrafix.net> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 21:59:28 GMT   > In closing, I would like to say that I find it VEEEEEERY interesting = (and > quite amusing) that scales are once again broadening, orchestral and > imitative voices are finding their ways BACK into specifications, = diapasons > are fattening up again (thank GOD!) and people are finally saying "what > happened to the warm and rich tones?"     THANK GOD AND ALL THINGS PURE AND HOLY!   Of the Churches I service, there is a remarkable cross-section of = all types of voicings and styles. Everything from warm Jardines, Tubby Mollers, subtle Bullions, = classy Estey's, Burdettes, even an elegant Tellers tells me that the neo-baroque = razor-blade diapasons with the "super-chiff" and phaser-rifle mixtures cannot be the norm for tone, and = is certainly not pleasing to me or some congregations. A few organists even asked me to "do = something with that thing." (Which was not an option, in a respect for the finisher's work, they are = good instruments and well built, just tough to listen to (which kind of ruins the whole = objective). Don't misunderstand, I'm not weighing in to bounce around on organs = of the 50's-80's, but only to give some thoughts- being an organist and a builder has produced = an extremely critical ear in my evalutaions, but my intent is not to insult. An 1830's Erben I had the pleasure of rebuilding had almost exactly = the same specification as a 1979 instrument (to remain anonymous), yet the Erben diapasons were = smooth and round,   the mixtures were brilliant and light (but not sharp at all), the flutes = were gentle and full, and any stop combined with anything else for a majestic and worshipful ensemble. = With the 79, combinations are tricky, many stops don't blend, and the ensemble is = almost nonexistant. The chiff is most typewriter like (all stops have it excessively) and is = unbearable. The treble is so prominent you could take off the diapason 8 and it actually sounds better. = We'll not talk about the reeds. It's strangely rough and unrefined, like unfinished. The 1883 Jardine I acquired and am in the process of refinishing has = diapason choruses on all three manuals, very nice mixtures, warm flutes, calming strings, and a = great ensemble, to which the diapason chorus is key. The wind pressure there is only 3-1/2 = inches also. Chiff is just right. Very pleasureable to play for hours, and endless combinations = are available, even with the trems on. The chorus and solo reeds are a joy to hear....and the = diapasons are not overly fat (although the tone is nice and full without being tubby). Maybe I'm an olde fudd, but the point should be to enjoy the velvety = shimmer and glorious risings of the majestic pipe organ, not be blown away by photon torpedo = mixtures or some reed that might as well be labelled "Gross Pounder 16." Next, warm up those = flame throwers, because I know there will be problems with what I will say.... The organ of the latter half of the 19th century and early 20th = century was (only in my humble opinion) the result of centuries of evolution on this noble = instrument and is the base to be improved upon (with the exception of the limited pedal departments) for = organ advances. THe neo-baroque deal seems to me to be a tonal step backwards. I agree with = Scott, Bruce, and Randy: I've seen many olde organs overseas like the Silbermans, Willis, = etc..., and many oldies here like Jardines, Roosevelts, early Mollers, etc... Their majesty, tonal = beauty, and majestic elegance outweighs any neo-baroque deal of the same magnitude 20 to 1. = Their speech is natural and unforced, the sound is round, relaxing, and uplifting: like a = little sample of tone left over from paradise. And LO! --These great organs are what are being = sampled for digital electronic organs. No wonder they have such a high draw around even = discriminating ears these days. They sample the best of the best (again, my opinion). DISCLAIMER: the neo-baroque examples I know, plenty as they are, may = not be typical of those that the list is familiar with, or at least I hope not, but the one I = play is wearysome to listen to even through the service and many postludes have been cut short = because of my profound anger with the chiffy and paper thin diapasons. Offertories are = obliterated by a chiffy nasal flute and chiff-city strings (!?) and anything is accompanied by a = disjointed ensemble (or lack thereof). WHen I play the first note, often the choir can hear me go = "Uugh" in a moderate sigh. Even BACH sounds nasty on this deal. BACH!!!!!! --BACH sounds nasty = on a neo-BAROQUE organ?! Did I miss something? Peace....as I sit here potentially smoldering from potential flames.... ...you may fire when ready...   Chris (the fat diapason and ice hockey playing doppelfruit advocate) = Malocheski   PS: I'll have more Jardine pictures ready soon... we have to move the = crated pipes and things to a new storage place before building and go through the "big cleaning." If = you want me to scan them to you, reply privately.      
(back) Subject: Position open, Long Island, NY From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 18:05:31 EDT     --part1_f7.c98a6c0.2884bf2b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Organist position:   Bell AME Zion Church Railroad Avenue Center Moriches, NY 11934   Organ: small, but immaculate, Conn electronic.. Also a piano.   Service: 11 am Sundays.   Choir: about 9 women, eager to learn. Rehearsal schedule flexible.   Pay: $100/week, plus LOTS of appreciation. The church is small and financially strapped.   --part1_f7.c98a6c0.2884bf2b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D"0">Organist position: <BR> <BR>Bell AME Zion Church <BR>Railroad Avenue <BR>Center Moriches, NY &nbsp;11934 <BR> <BR>Organ: &nbsp;small, but immaculate, Conn electronic.. &nbsp;Also a = piano. <BR> <BR>Service: &nbsp;11 am Sundays. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Choir: &nbsp;about 9 women, eager to learn. &nbsp;Rehearsal schedule = flexible. <BR> <BR>Pay: &nbsp;$100/week, plus LOTS of appreciation. &nbsp;The church is = small and <BR>financially strapped.</FONT></HTML>   --part1_f7.c98a6c0.2884bf2b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Lemmens' Fanfare - Last 4 measures?? From: "diaphone 64" <diaphone64@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 18:24:12 -0400   The last 4 ms of the Lemmens Fanfare have been iffy by many organists...   I have a copy of the original publication in my library. The last 4 measures of that original publication is a pedal solo - octave leaps in = the pedal and gracenotes.   Then I also have the Davis organ technique book which has the last 4 measures outline the D chord then three full D chords in all different octaves of the keyboard, then the "original" is in smaller print below.     Hope this helps. Jason Comet _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Re: 6 Feet Under From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 17:29:51 -0500   At 01:16 PM 7/16/01 -0400, DionDave wrote: >Did anyone catch "Six Feet Under" on HBO last night? An organ console in = a >nice church was prominently displayed in a scene in which a priest is >interviewed for an assistant rector's job. The show is set in LA. = Anyone >recognize the church and the organ? Viewing the console, I could tell = that >the organ was a substantial three manual with stop knobs rather than = titling >talbets over the top manual.   Hi, DD!   I saw the show, and the console (there were even glimpses of the bottom of facade pipes on either side of the chancel of the church). I noticed a couple of oddities about that console that might make it unique... (at least...or, a prop...? I have no idea).   The console shot (while the actor in the scene approached the console and touched the keyboards) showed a 'normal' row of tilt-tabs (couplers) in their 'normal' position on the nameboard. BUT -- there was also what appeared to be a row of round drawknobs below them...and also a row of pistons below the "knobs" -- *all* above the top manual keyboard.   Now, I know that old Austin consoles often have pistons above the top manual (why, I never quite understood, but that's not important now) but even at that -- what the h*** were/are the knobs for...??   Curiously yours --   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR      
(back) Subject: Re: 6 Feet Under From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 18:37:17 EDT   I saw stop knobs AND tilting tablets on the nameboard of the console. I didn't recognize the console as anything obvious like an Aeolian Skinner, Moeller or Casavant. There is a cantilevered facade on both sides of the choir and a chamade in back. By the way I used to service the organ (a = very nice 2M Moeller) in a prominent funeral home in Washington, DC and had to = go thru the prep room to oil the blower. I got to see all the equipment they = use as the blower was in the supply closet. All I can say is that I have left strict orders for my body to be cremated when the time comes. Also, the strangest thing in there was half a tennis ball sitting on one of those stainless steel trays. I still can't figure out what they do with that and =   probably don't want to know.   Cheers:   Alan B  
(back) Subject: Re: SFU, cont. yet again From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 18:40:08 EDT   In a message dated 7/16/01 3:10:11 PM Eastern Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   << Wonder how much they paid the extras for THAT scene (chuckle)? Church must seat close to a thousand ... Bud >> Probably just the first few rows and the rest done with computer graphics.   AAB  
(back) Subject: Console $ From: "Robert Hullem" <rhullem@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 22:52:42 -0000   I have been contacted by a donor who may wish to fund the replacement of = an ailing 2 manual 1950's console that controls about 15 ranks, 30 some = stops. For a variety of reasons. some emotional, this query is restricted to a = new console and control system, wired to existing chests and pipework. What is the going rate for a two manual stop tab console by a = major/decent builder? There is no interest in cutting corners by finding a used = console or jury-rigging. No additions, either pipe or non-pipe, drawknobs or anything else are possible under this offer. It is not good to look in the mouth of a gift horse...until you can see the horse. The most recent console $ I remember was a Moller III stop tab that was about $44,000 about 8 years ago. Your help is appreciated.   RH   _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Sheet music from Canada's past available online From: "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 19:47:15 -0400   http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/4/1/index-e.html   Stumbled onto this site while looking for something completely unrelated. Seems the National Library of Canada is doing something like the Library of Congress' site, Music for the Nation http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/smhtml/smhome.html   While searching for the LoC site's url (it figures I hadn't moved my old bookmarks onto the new system yet), I stumbled onto http://www.lib.duke.edu/music/sheetmusic/collections.html ...which would keep anyone surfing for the forseeable future. Seems there's even a site with mpeg/Quicktime/RealMedia examples of dance steps from 1600-1920 http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/dihtml/divideos.html ...ain't digital life somethin'?   Happy browsing!   Have fun! Ad ;->    
(back) Subject: Fees etc. From: "cjs" <musicjs2001@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 19:12:37 -0500   I have to get in here but know I will get blasted with "How can you let = that happen?" Either this area of the country is way behind or I missed the boat somewhere. The area is South Bend, IN so if anyone knows about = better fees, let me and the list know. My church just put together a building = use policy and I saw it for the first time recently. "My" wedding fee is $75 for members and non-members. The Pastor is free to members and $150 to non-members. I did point out that the wedding fee was $75 10 years ago = when I first went there. I have never received more than $150 and I play a few weddings as guest organist at various churches. ( I could set my own fee in some of these circumstances but have believed that I'm in the normal range around here.) The normal funeral is $50, which is standard with the funeral homes around here reguardless of the quality of the organist.   As far as substitute organist fees, my church still pays $60. I just got = a raise to $9000 up from $8000 (yr) because I showed the powers that be the AGO scale where I was way off the bottom. I have a Master's and over 30 years experience. This is one service and one choir rehearsal where I direct and play and it is a liturgical church. There are all the extra services and meetings of course. We did have an additional Sat night service on and off over the past 4 years and I got an additional $50 for that. I used to feel guilty (somewhat) about that because only 15 to 20 people were coming to it. Before I approached my church about a raise I = did some checking around and most of the salaries are very low with the exception of a couple of full-time positions and a couple of others that I know about. The cost of living is lower here than in the big cities in = the midwest. Milk still costs $2 a gallon and gas has been around $1.50 to $2.00 a gallon. Fast food value meals run around $3 to $4. A modest but more modern 2000 sq ft house is around $125K.   I have been applying for new positions in locations outside of this area = in the past few months. They have mostly been for full-time but some have = been part-time. There is a reluctance for churches to move a person for a part-time church position.   I get that California and New York salaries would be much higher but the figures here seem excessively low.     _________________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Six Feet Under, cont. From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2001 08:14:10 +0800   City in the outback in Australia? Precious few cities in the outback. Towns - yes! Cities? No! Art galleries inthe outback? Hahahahaha! Bob Elms   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > The scene in another episode where "David" imagines the packed > congregation naked at his installation as a deacon is HYSTERICAL, but > it's derivative ... there was a REVERSE scene in that movie set in > Australia about the young vicar and his wife in the outback, on a > mission to convince the hedonistic artist to withdraw his "smutty" show > in the art gallery in the city ..    
(back) Subject: the movie From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 17:37:09 -0700   No, no, no, Bob!   The GALLERY was in SYDNEY ... the archbishop sent this young priest to the outback, where the artist LIVED, to try and dissuade him from displaying = his paintings of nudes. Perhaps I didn't make that clear.   Cheers,   Bud   Bob Elms wrote:   > City in the outback in Australia? Precious few cities in the outback. > Towns - yes! Cities? No! Art galleries inthe outback? Hahahahaha! > Bob Elms > > quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > > > The scene in another episode where "David" imagines the packed > > congregation naked at his installation as a deacon is HYSTERICAL, but > > it's derivative ... there was a REVERSE scene in that movie set in > > Australia about the young vicar and his wife in the outback, on a > > mission to convince the hedonistic artist to withdraw his "smutty" = show > > in the art gallery in the city .. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Frey, Liszt "Ad nos" at Crystal Cathedral From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 17:35:55 -0700 (PDT)   --- ChPardini@aol.com wrote: > We recently had Stephen Tharp in concert at the CC > last month, and he did the > Ad Nos flawlessly from memory in about 30 minutes. > It was absolutely > stunning. I do hope he records it, if he hasn't > already.   We heard Alexander Frey play the "Ad nos" at the Crystal Cathedral in the mid-1990's. Many of the organists there remember it as being the most electrifying performance of that work they ever heard. I remember that the audience was on their feet SCREAMING bravos before Frey even released the final chord. His performance was extremely orchestral and what a technique! I've rarely seen an audience go bonkers like that at an organ recital.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Ad nos From: "Jackson R. Williams II" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 17:39:06 -0700 (PDT)     --- Wurlibird1@aol.com wrote: >to > paraphrase Rita Rudner, I don't want to play > anything that "feels good" that > requires 30 minutes. :) > > Jim Pitts   I love to prolong things that feel good!   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Reasons for Sub Fees From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 20:41:39 EDT     --part1_74.d2e8de9.2884e3c3_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Ok, since Bruce says I can afford more than just two cents for what I = charge (LOL) here's my 25 cents--the bottom line is that you get what you pay for, plus =   the fact that I am comfortable (and able) to go from the the most Spirit-filled Pentecostal shoutin' service to the pissiest "smells and = bells" high-church, I've learned that they need me more than I need them, so I = can write my own ticket. A couple of weeks ago, I played the organ and piano = for the National Baptist Church U.S.A.annual convention in Charlotte, NC. I played the Albert Travis "Toccata on 'Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart'" as part = of the prelude, as well as serveral hymn arrangments for organ and handbells. = During the congregational singing and on several choir selections, I = played piano, with Dr. James Abbington (of Shaw University) on the organ. = Following the program, I was told (while he was laughing hysterically) by the choir director from one of the large Charlotte churches that I was going to wake = up one morning and be Black, because no White man should be allowed to play classical organ and then switch gears and play Black gospel and = contemporary gospel music in the proper styles. I don't mean to brag, but when you can = do it and do it right, you can charge what you want. The problem with most musicians out there is that they are mediocre at best, and why should a church or family pay out the nose for something that isn't up to par? I = have seen that in funeral service people don't mind paying for service that = goes above and beyond the call of duty. What it boils down to is that you give =   them the best and they'll pay premium prices....just like in retail, "you = get what you pay for."   Monty Bennett   --part1_74.d2e8de9.2884e3c3_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Ok, since Bruce says I = can afford more than just two cents for what I charge <BR>(LOL) <BR>here's my 25 cents--the bottom line is that you get what you pay for, = plus <BR>the fact that I am comfortable (and able) to go from the the most <BR>Spirit-filled Pentecostal shoutin' service to the pissiest "smells and = bells" <BR>high-church, I've learned that they need me more than I need them, so = I can <BR>write my own ticket. &nbsp;A couple of weeks ago, I played the organ = and piano for <BR>the National Baptist Church U.S.A.annual convention in Charlotte, NC. = &nbsp;I <BR>played the Albert Travis "Toccata on 'Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart'" as = part of <BR>the prelude, as well as serveral hymn arrangments for organ and = handbells. &nbsp; <BR>During the congregational singing and on several choir selections, I = played <BR>piano, with Dr. James Abbington (of Shaw University) on the organ. = &nbsp;Following <BR>the program, I was told (while he was laughing hysterically) by the = choir <BR>director from one of the large Charlotte churches that I was going to = wake up <BR>one morning and be Black, because no White man should be allowed to = play <BR>classical organ and then switch gears and play Black gospel and = contemporary <BR>gospel music in the proper styles. &nbsp;I don't mean to brag, but = when you can do <BR>it and do it right, you can charge what you want. &nbsp;The problem = with most <BR>musicians out there is that they are mediocre at best, and why should = a <BR>church or family pay out the nose for something that isn't up to par? = &nbsp;I have <BR>seen that in funeral service people don't mind paying for service that = goes <BR>above and beyond the call of duty. &nbsp;What it boils down to is that = you give <BR>them the best and they'll pay premium prices....just like in retail, = "you get <BR>what you pay for." <BR> <BR>Monty Bennett</FONT></HTML>   --part1_74.d2e8de9.2884e3c3_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: the movie From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2001 09:15:42 +0800   Oh, thanks Bud, I getcher! But didn't the archbishop object to the nudes in the Sydney Art Gallery (which would be one of many galleries in that city of 4.5 million souls)? Ooops! We seem to be offtopic again! Bob.   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > No, no, no, Bob! > > The GALLERY was in SYDNEY ... the archbishop sent this young priest to = the > outback, where the artist LIVED, to try and dissuade him from = displaying his > paintings of nudes. Perhaps I didn't make that clear. > >    
(back) Subject: Re: the movie From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 21:24:03 EDT   That flick is "Sirens" 1994 with Hugh Grant (the minister), Tara = Fitzgerald (the minister's wife), Sam Neill and Elle Macpherson,   Cheers:   Alan B  
(back) Subject: Re: Tom Hazelton From: <RJAYWILL@aol.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 21:56:51 EDT   Why don't you call him and ask him about his music. He works for Allen, = any local representative could probably come up with his phone number.   R Jay Williamson  
(back) Subject: Tom Hazelton's # From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 22:19:12 EDT     --part1_53.8b9189f.2884faa0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   His number where he can be reached is (610) 966-2202. Sorry, I cannot = give=3D20 out his private home number nor his private cell number, but you can = reach=3D20 him through the number listed above and leave a voicemail if he is out.   SCOTT F. FOPPIANO, Principal Organist and Director of Music and Liturgy THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI (Geo. Kilgen & Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) =3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens, fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D     --part1_53.8b9189f.2884faa0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#0000a0" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">His number where he = can be rea=3D ched is (610) 966-2202. &nbsp;Sorry, I cannot give=3D20 <BR>out his private home number nor his private cell number, but you can = rea=3D ch=3D20 <BR>him through the number listed above and leave a voicemail if he is = out. <BR> <BR><B>SCOTT F. FOPPIANO</B>, Principal Organist and Director of Music and = L=3D iturgy <BR>THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI <BR>(Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) <BR><I>=3DE2=3D80=3D9CCantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat = dicens, <BR>fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D</I> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_53.8b9189f.2884faa0_boundary--