PipeChat Digest #2240 - Wednesday, July 18, 2001
 
Re: The "I Was Glad" of the 21st Century
  by "BridgewaterUMC Director of Music" <bridgewatermusic@hotmail.c
Position available - Lewisvile, TX [cross-posted]
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
2001 Fall & Holiday Choral Concerts at Fourth Presbyterian Church	 in Chi
  by "Cole, Carroll" <CCole@fourthchurch.org>
Re: A "Fuller" key
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Reasons for Sub Fees
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: the movie
  by "WDBabcock" <WDBabcock@msn.com>
information on Garrett House's family tree (x-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
July 19 NYC Recital
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: The "I Was Glad" of the 21st Century From: "BridgewaterUMC Director of Music" <bridgewatermusic@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2001 07:50:28 -0400   Scott:   Indeed this is a grand piece! While not for the typical choir, any choir that has been well trained can pull this off. Thanks for bringing it to = our attention. Id almost forgotten about it! Think Ill put it on my = September list as well!   Wishing you Gods best   Craig   _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Position available - Lewisvile, TX [cross-posted] From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2001 07:35:33 -0500   I have been asked to post this for any who might be interested. Lewisville is between Denton and Dallas in the DFW metroplex. Thanks, Margo Dillard organist, First United Methodist Lewisville, TX       Part Time Organist Position available at the Episcopal Church of the Annunciation. 602n. Old Orchard Lane Lewisville, Texas 75077   Please submit resumes to Father David Holland or Peter Schindler, Director of Music Church Phone: 972-221-3531 Fax: 972-221-3532 Email: churchoffice@annunciationlewisville.org Web: www.annunciationlewisville.org     Responsibilities: 2 Sunday Masses, rehearsals, special occasion services.   We are a Parish with a deep commitment to music of quality and variety. Organist will work with the Music Director and Clergy in preparation for services. . We seek a classically trained Organist with excellent reading/playing skills and a love for liturgy. Ours is a vital and growing congregation with a wide variety of musical taste and experience. Materials will be representative of all styles and periods from Chant to the present day. Salary is negotiable. Current instrument is a Rogers electronic Organ. Within a year we expect to install a substantial Pipe Organ into our Sanctuary. Position is available immediately.      
(back) Subject: 2001 Fall & Holiday Choral Concerts at Fourth Presbyterian Church in Chicago From: "Cole, Carroll" <CCole@fourthchurch.org> Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2001 09:08:43 -0500   We cordially invite you to join us for these concerts and services of worship. Mark your calendars now before the concert rush begins for the fall.   If you are not on our mailing list, we urge you to send a return e-mail = with your name, mailing address and phone number so that we may mail you a complete brochure of our 2001-2002 concert series. If you are already on = our arts mailing list, please send changes so that our information remains current.   Visit www.fourthchurch.org to learn about weekly service music by the resident choirs and about other special arts events.   We hope to see you here at Fourth Church soon!     Sunday, September 9, 2001 3:00 p.m. Gonville and Caius College Choir Dr. Geoffrey Webber, director Gavin Roberts and Timothy Kennedy, organ scholars Recognized as one of Britain's leading collegiate choirs, this ensemble of twenty-two singers will perform works by John Taverner, Charles Wood, = Robert Nicholls, Colin Mawby, and others. Suggested donations: $15 / $12 senior and students   Sunday, September 16, 2001 6:30 p.m. Vespers Missa Brevis by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina The Morning Choir John W. W. Sherer, conductor   Tuesday, October 16, 2001 8:00 p.m. Zurich Boys' Choir Alphons von Aarburg, conductor This energetic ensemble of sixty young singers brings their sparkling renditions of European and Swiss folk songs along to Chicago during their 2001 tour. No suggested donation.   Sunday, November 4, 2001 6:30 p.m. Vespers Service Requiem by Herbert Howells The Morning Choir John W. W. Sherer, conductor   Wednesday, December 5, 2001 8:00 p.m. Chanticleer This 12-voice male ensemble will celebrate the holiday season with music ranging from the Renaissance to contemporary carols and spirituals. (co-sponsored by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra) Tickets available through the Chicago Symphony box office by calling (312) 294-3030.   Friday, December 7, 2001 8:00 p.m. Chicago a cappella Jonathan Miller, artistic director "Holidays a cappella" Escape the holiday bustle as the nine versatile singers of Chicago a cappella lighten up the season with a dazzling variety of musical cheer. For ticket information, call (773) 755-1628. Visit www.chicagoacappella.org.   Sunday, December 16, 2001 6:30 p.m. A Festival of Lessons and Carols for Advent The Fourth Church Festival Choir John W. W. Sherer, conductor The Children's and Youth Choirs Mary Theresa Reed, conductor   Friday, December 21, 2001 8:00 p.m. Chicago Choral Artists Bart Bradfield, artistic director Carols and songs from around the world, spanning over 500 years, celebrate the winter solstice, its pagan origins, and its connection to modern = holiday customs. For ticket information, call (773) 549-7751. Visit www.chicagochoralartists.org.   C. Carroll Cole, Coordinator of Fine Arts Fourth Presbyterian Church 126 East Chestnut Street, Chicago, IL 60611-2094 312.787.2729, ext. 252 facsimile 312.787.4584 ccole@fourthchurch.org <http://www.fourthchurch.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: A "Fuller" key From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2001 09:24:44 -0500     --------------E63CCDDD6A6A4B8AA2BA7C95 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I'm not sure if there is a doctoral dissertation, but there is quite a bit = of research in journals - look up "chromesthesia" ( I may not be spelling = that right). Who knows what the reason is given differences in temperament, = etc. - some people associate and "see" different colors when they hear music in different keys or different pitches or different timbres. For whatever = reason - different keys don't sound the same and some people prefer some keys = over others. We had 3 professors at my undergraduate school who saw colors = with different keys, and they were very definite about what key was what color = - but they each had different colors for every key. Then, there was the organ teacher at another college who associated colors with the timbre of = different practice to the point that he had the walls of the practice rooms painted = to match....   My personal theory from teaching piano students is that I find adult = beginning students who play or played band instruments prefer flat keys and students = who played orchestral instruments prefer sharp keys - I think simply because = when they played in these ensembles and learned to read music there this was = the majority of the music they played. I also find that various players agree = that sharp scales are easier to play, but the chords structures make flat keys = lie under the hand more comfortably. But of course, this all has to do with playing the keys, not listening to them - but as players, I suspect = playing influences our "taste" in keys. I know I have always liked D-flat - I = think of it as a nice warm, dark key - but I don't like C-sharp at all - it is = shrill and strident. Obviously these two can't "sound" different on a keyboard - = it has to be a response to the way my brain feels when I read them. The same = is true of C-flat and B. (And I played flute in both bands and orchestras = and played keyboard for years before either - so, go figure)   Margo       Panning wrote:   > > > If you think that I'm arguing that keys have no color, I've not made = myself > clear. I certainly perceive that they do. But I believe we ascribe = colors > to different keys because we associate certain keys with music > traditionally and historically written for that key. However, no one has > admitted that this might be a factor; most have tried to show that the > different keys of (theoretically perfect) equal temperament are somehow > capable of possessing different characters. I would be ever so grateful = if > someone would explain the actual physics of this, rather than vaguely > asserting that it's so. There must be a doctoral dissertation on this > subject, but I've not found it yet. > > >   --------------E63CCDDD6A6A4B8AA2BA7C95 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> I'm not sure if there is a doctoral dissertation, but there is quite a bit of research in journals - look up "chromesthesia" ( I may not be = spelling that right).&nbsp; Who knows what the reason is given differences in = temperament, etc. - some people associate and "see" different colors when they hear music in different keys or different pitches or different timbres.&nbsp; For whatever reason - different keys don't sound the same and some people prefer some keys over others.&nbsp; We had 3 professors at my = undergraduate school who saw colors with different keys, and they were very definite about what key was what color - but they each had different colors for every key.&nbsp; Then, there was the organ teacher at another college who associated colors with the timbre of different practice to the point that he had the walls of the practice rooms painted to match.... <p>My personal theory from teaching piano students is that I find adult beginning students who play or played band instruments prefer flat keys and students who played orchestral instruments prefer sharp keys - I think simply because when they played in these ensembles and learned to read music there this was the majority of the music they played.&nbsp; I also find that various players agree that sharp scales are easier to play, but the chords structures make flat keys lie under the hand more = comfortably.&nbsp; But of course, this all has to do with playing the keys, not listening to them - but as players, I suspect playing influences our "taste" in = keys.&nbsp; I know I have always liked D-flat - I think of it as a nice warm, dark key - but I don't like C-sharp at all - it is shrill and strident.&nbsp; Obviously these two can't "sound" different on a keyboard - it has to be a response to the way my brain feels when I read them.&nbsp; The same is true of C-flat and B.&nbsp; (And I played flute in both bands and = orchestras and played keyboard for years before either - so, go figure) <p>Margo <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <p>Panning wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE>&nbsp; <p>If you think that I'm arguing that keys have no color, I've not made myself <br>clear. I certainly perceive that they do. But I believe we ascribe colors <br>to different keys because we associate certain keys with music <br>traditionally and historically written for that key. However, no one has <br>admitted that this might be a factor; most have tried to show that the <br>different keys of (theoretically perfect) equal temperament are = somehow <br>capable of possessing different characters. I would be ever so = grateful if <br>someone would explain the actual physics of this, rather than vaguely <br>asserting that it's so. There must be a doctoral dissertation on this <br>subject, but I've not found it yet. <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <br><a href=3D"mailto:requests@pipechat.org"></a>&nbsp;</blockquote> </html>   --------------E63CCDDD6A6A4B8AA2BA7C95--    
(back) Subject: Re: Reasons for Sub Fees From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2001 13:23:28 -0400   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3078221009_10216133_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit   From: RMB10@aol.com Subject: Reasons for Sub Fees   What it boils down to is that you give them the best and they'll pay = premium prices....just like in retail, "you get what you pay for."     Monty, I quite agree. And the corrolary is also true: You [should] pay = for what you get.   Alan   --MS_Mac_OE_3078221009_10216133_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Reasons for Sub Fees</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <B>From: </B>RMB10@aol.com<BR> <B>Subject: </B>Reasons for Sub Fees<BR> <BR> <FONT SIZE=3D3D"4">What it boils down to is that you give them the best = and the=3D y'll pay premium <BR> prices....just like in retail, &quot;you get what you pay for.&quot;<BR> <BR> <BR> Monty, I quite agree. &nbsp;And the corrolary is also true: &nbsp;You = [shou=3D ld] pay for what you get.<BR> <BR> Alan</FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --MS_Mac_OE_3078221009_10216133_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: Re: the movie From: "WDBabcock" <WDBabcock@msn.com> Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2001 15:10:29 -0500   Is it EVER possible for nudes to be off topic? Scandalous thought. Bill   ----- Original Message ----- From: Bob Elms <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, July 16, 2001 8:15 PM Subject: Re: the movie     > Oh, thanks Bud, I getcher! But didn't the archbishop object to the nudes > in the Sydney Art Gallery (which would be one of many galleries in that > city of 4.5 million souls)? > Ooops! We seem to be offtopic again! > Bob. > > quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > > > No, no, no, Bob! > > > > The GALLERY was in SYDNEY ... the archbishop sent this young priest to the > outback, where the artist LIVED, to try and dissuade him from displaying his > paintings of nudes. Perhaps I didn't make that clear. > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: information on Garrett House's family tree (x-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2001 13:39:54 -0700   Somebody who saves their Trackers ... I'd like to find information on Garrett House's family tree ... one of my parishioner's maiden name was "House", and she was FASCINATED that she might be related to him ... she's from the right part of the country, but I don't remember the details of the House article in the Tracker.   Thanks!   Bud    
(back) Subject: July 19 NYC Recital From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2001 22:17:41 -0400   Hi!   Here is my next half-hour program on Aeolian-Skinner opus 1412 at The Church of the Epiphany, NYC, this Thursday at 12:15.   Toccata Eugene Gigout Ponder this in your heart Daniel Pinkham Au soir de l'ascension du Seigneur Dom Paul Benoit Lotus Strayhorn/Wyton Toccata and Fugue in d minor J. S. Bach   The Benoit piece is superb...head and shoulders above his "Devotional Pieces..." and I am so sorry I can't honor requests for xeroxes of the Strayhorn...   This recital, like the other seven in my series, is free and lunch may be taken into the church. The organ is an unaltered masterpiece by Joseph Whiteford and is worth quite a pilgrimage. While you're here, visit our delightful Garden and our Baptismal font, the latter carved in the first quarter of the twelfth century. (We were only founded in 1833...the font was a gift.)   Next week, July 26, my colleague and fellow Fellow Frank Crosio will be guest recitalist--I shall be in Pennsylvania working with the RSCM. His program, like all eight in the series, ends with a major Bach work--in his case, the Wedge. I shall be 'bach' on August 2 with the Saint Anne and other pieces.   Why do so many recitals BEGIN with Bach? I find that ENDING with Bach is really refreshing, indeed liberating. The Bishop does not process ahead = of the Acolytes!   The Church of the Epiphany is located on York Avenue on the Upper East = Side at East 74th St. Take the M31 bus from Carnegie Hall and go straight crosstown and up Sutton Place. Or take the 6 train (the green line or the IRT as it's still called) to 77th and Lexington and walk east and south. Or hail a taxi and bark "Yawk and Sevenny-Fawth!"   Call 212-737-2720 x 24 for more information.   Best,   Jonathan