PipeChat Digest #2253 - Saturday, July 21, 2001
 
Re: Perils of Pianos in church
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
no organs in old churches?
  by "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net>
small churches and "catalog" organs
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Perils of Pianos in Churches
  by <Doppelflote8@aol.com>
Re: Perils of Pianos in church
  by "Jeffery Korns" <jakorns@home.com>
Re: small churches and "catalog" organs
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: small churches and "catalog" organs
  by "Jeffery Korns" <jakorns@home.com>
proliferation of organs
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Perils of Pianos in church
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: small churches and "catalog" organs
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Perils of Pianos in church From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2001 16:38:58 EDT     --part1_4f.e8c00be.288b4262_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 7/21/01 3:29:34 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = jakorns@home.com writes:     > Just to stoke the issue, may I suggest that obviously the OHS is not = going > to go look at churches that do not have organs.   Well DAH! But you make it sound as though small country churches did not have organs until appliances entered the scene. There are a goodly = number of organs in small out of the way places in their original home dating = from the 1800s. For instance:   First Baptist - Madison, Indiana - "Hymns were 'lined' until the 1880's =   when a small reed organ was introduced. The ladies of the church started raising money for a pipe organ in 1899, and the Felgemaker organ, which = cost $1000, was dedicated 20 January 1901." (from the Organ Handbook 1993 Kentucky OHS convention)   St. John's UCC - Madison, Indiana - Koehnken & Grimm pipe organ 1/9 installed in the church in 1879, was used at the OHS convention in 1993   St. John's Episcopal, Versailles, Kentucky "The present church was consecreated 28 May 1885; it appears tha the old organ was moved into the = new building, but who built it or what became of it when it was replaced, research has not so far revealed. It may have been taken in trade by Hook = & Hastings. Op. 1742, originally faced down the nave...." Op. 1742 was installed in 1897 by H&H.   Versailles Presbyterian Church, V, Kentucky - 2/13 H. Pilcher's Sons, installed in 1878.   Bates College, Lewiston, ME has an organ by Henry Erben previously = installed in Advent Christian Church, Biddeford, ME, originally built in 1850. 1/3   Second Baptist Chuch, Bowdoinham, ME -- 1/7 Wm. B.D. Simmons organ = installed in 1850, played at the OHS Maine convention in 1992.   St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Newcastle, ME - Geo. S. Hutchings, 1888   First Congregational Church, South Paris, ME "According to the parish history, the first organ was purchased in 1855.... and sold to the South Paris Congregational Church in 1848." Emons Howard 2/17 organ installed = in 1890   Buckfield Community Church, ME E7GG Hook, Op 104, 1850   Turner Village Church, ME - 1/8 Henry Erben organ   ..... and the list goes on. The midwest is full of small churches with their original pipe organs from this period. Your statements are = misleading about the number of churches that did NOT have pipe organs. Of course, there are many very small churches in the country that were too small for = any instrument, barely large enough to accommodate more than four or five families.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_4f.e8c00be.288b4262_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 7/21/01 3:29:34 PM Eastern Daylight Time, jakorns@home.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Just to stoke the = issue, may I suggest that obviously the OHS is not going <BR>to go look at churches that do not have organs. &nbsp;</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Well DAH! &nbsp;But you make it sound as though small country churches = did not <BR>have organs until appliances entered the scene. &nbsp;&nbsp;There are = a goodly number <BR>of organs in small out of the way places in their original home dating = from <BR>the 1800s. &nbsp;&nbsp;For instance: <BR> <BR>First Baptist - Madison, Indiana &nbsp;- &nbsp;&nbsp;"Hymns were = 'lined' until the 1880's <BR>when a small reed organ was introduced. &nbsp;The ladies of the church = started <BR>raising money for a pipe organ in 1899, and the Felgemaker organ, = which cost <BR>$1000, was dedicated 20 January 1901." &nbsp;(from the Organ Handbook = 1993 <BR>Kentucky OHS convention) <BR> <BR>St. John's UCC - Madison, Indiana - &nbsp;Koehnken &amp; Grimm pipe = organ 1/9 <BR>installed in the church in 1879, was used at the OHS convention in = 1993 <BR> <BR>St. John's Episcopal, Versailles, Kentucky &nbsp;"The present church = was <BR>consecreated 28 May 1885; it appears tha the old organ was moved into = the new <BR>building, but who built it or what became of it when it was replaced, <BR>research has not so far revealed. &nbsp;It may have been taken in = trade by Hook &amp; <BR>Hastings. &nbsp;Op. 1742, originally faced down the nave...." = &nbsp;Op. 1742 was <BR>installed in 1897 by H&amp;H. <BR> <BR>Versailles Presbyterian Church, V, Kentucky - &nbsp;2/13 H. Pilcher's = Sons, <BR>installed in 1878. <BR> <BR>Bates College, Lewiston, ME has an organ by Henry Erben previously = installed <BR>in Advent Christian Church, Biddeford, ME, originally built in 1850. = &nbsp;&nbsp;1/3 <BR> <BR>Second Baptist Chuch, Bowdoinham, ME -- 1/7 Wm. B.D. Simmons organ = installed <BR>in 1850, played at the OHS Maine convention in 1992. <BR> <BR>St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Newcastle, ME - &nbsp;Geo. S. = Hutchings, 1888 <BR> <BR>First Congregational Church, South Paris, ME &nbsp;"According to the = parish <BR>history, the first organ was purchased in 1855.... and sold to the = South <BR>Paris Congregational Church in 1848." &nbsp;&nbsp;Emons Howard 2/17 = organ installed in <BR>1890 <BR> <BR>Buckfield Community Church, ME &nbsp;&nbsp;E7GG Hook, Op 104, 1850 <BR> <BR>Turner Village Church, ME &nbsp;- &nbsp;1/8 &nbsp;Henry Erben organ <BR> <BR>.... and the list goes on. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The midwest is full of = small churches with <BR>their original pipe organs from this period. &nbsp;Your statements are = misleading <BR>about the number of churches that did NOT have pipe organs. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Of course, <BR>there are many very small churches in the country that were too small = for any <BR>instrument, barely large enough to accommodate more than four or five <BR>families. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_4f.e8c00be.288b4262_boundary--  
(back) Subject: no organs in old churches? From: "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2001 17:02:00 -0400   Subject: Sweeping generalizations about organs in small churches From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2001 12:53:03 -0700   I REALLY don't think it's possible to generalize.   Bud, you said it all very well and saved a lot of us a lot of typing!   That was the biggest crock I've heard in a long time, of course, maybe in = some part of the country that we don't know about, it really was like = that, but not here. Wayne    
(back) Subject: small churches and "catalog" organs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2001 14:07:35 -0700   Hook & Hastings, Hinners, Estey, and others did a thriving business in small, stock-model "catalog" organs ... they can still be found just about everywhere the railroads went in the 19th century. They came with simple instructions on how to set them up ... the local blacksmith was usually pressed into service ... eventually the factory sent a tuner out when there were enough organs in an area, or an itinerant one passed through town ... or the organist tuned it himself (grin). They seldom had reeds, for obvious reasons (grin).   There is a one-manual Johnson organ in a former Deutches Evangelische Kirche (now UCC) just south of San Diego that came round the Horn on a sailing ship (!). It's still played every Sunday. It DOES have a reed, a fine cross between an Oboe and a Trumpet, labeled "Oboe".   Sears Roebuck sold reed organs out of their catalog ... they probably accounted for a LOT of organs in smaller churches.   Estey, of course, did a land-office business in reed organs, mostly carried on by telegraph. There's a fascinating list of abbreviations for ordering the various models, to save money on telegrams.   Cheers,   Bud, who JUST missed getting a 2 manual and pedal Estey pipe-top recently    
(back) Subject: Perils of Pianos in Churches From: <Doppelflote8@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2001 17:11:07 EDT     --part1_97.187b673c.288b49eb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     Dear List It just as enjoyable ( to me and to the congregation) to play a Chopin Nocturn for the prelude/offertory/postlude as it is to play a movment = from, say, one of the Mendelssohn Sonatas. It is "no lesser" of an instrument = than the organ...just different...which is a good thing.   Food for thought Alan Carrick Methuen, MA   --part1_97.187b673c.288b49eb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = COLOR=3D"#400040" SIZE=3D2><B> <BR>Dear List <BR>It just as enjoyable ( to me and to the congregation) to play a Chopin =   <BR>Nocturn for the prelude/offertory/postlude &nbsp;as it is to play a = movment from, <BR>say, one of the Mendelssohn Sonatas. &nbsp;It is "no lesser" of an = instrument than <BR>the organ...just different...which is a good thing. <BR> <BR>Food for thought <BR>Alan Carrick <BR>Methuen, MA </B></FONT></HTML>   --part1_97.187b673c.288b49eb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Perils of Pianos in church From: "Jeffery Korns" <jakorns@home.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2001 16:15:56 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0008_01C11200.6C3CABE0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Gee Bruce, The churches you listed are east of the Mississippi. I conceded the = =3D fact that many of the churches there are older and more established. I come from a church background that is common in this section of =3D the country (for smaller churches). And reed organs were used, (because = =3D prior to 1920 they cost less and were more dependable than pianos). But = =3D the wholesale organ (as we know it) explosion did not occur until after = =3D WWII. If you study the history of American religion (and this includes all = =3D groups such as the Amish, Mennonites, Quakers, Bretheren,Mormons) you =3D will find that many churches were transitory in nature. Often they =3D split or merged and were not concerned with building substantial =3D buildings until 10-30 years into their existence. In one Minnesota town, for instance, there was one Mennonite Church, = =3D in about 1885 there was a split over, among other things, using =3D instruments to accompany what had been plainsong (10 years later the =3D original church decided to use piano too, they now have a pipe organ), = =3D By 1900 this town of less than 1,000 people wound up with 5 Mennonite =3D churches, 1 Lutheran, 1 Presbyterian, and 1Christian and Missionary =3D Alliance church. The point is churches constantly have split through =3D the American history and new ones constantly open and old ones split or = =3D close.=3D20   Oh, by the way, I checked your web site Nice Dogs!!   Jeff Korns http://members.home.net/jakorns/ .... and the list goes on. The midwest is full of small churches =3D with=3D20 their original pipe organs from this period. Your statements are =3D misleading=3D20 about the number of churches that did NOT have pipe organs. Of =3D course,=3D20 there are many very small churches in the country that were too small = =3D for any=3D20 instrument, barely large enough to accommodate more than four or = five=3D20 families.=3D20   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com =3D20     ------=3D_NextPart_000_0008_01C11200.6C3CABE0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4611.1300" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Gee Bruce,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The churches you listed are east = =3D of the=3D20 Mississippi.&nbsp; I conceded the fact that many of the churches there =3D are older=3D20 and more established.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I come from a church background = =3D that is=3D20 common in this section of the country (for smaller churches).&nbsp; And = =3D reed=3D20 organs were used, (because prior to 1920 they cost less and were more =3D dependable=3D20 than pianos).&nbsp; But the wholesale organ (as we know it) explosion =3D did not=3D20 occur until after WWII.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; If you study the history of =3D American=3D20 religion (and this includes all groups such as the Amish, Mennonites, =3D Quakers,=3D20 Bretheren,Mormons) you will find that many churches =3D were&nbsp;transitory&nbsp;in=3D20 nature.&nbsp; Often they split or merged and were not concerned with =3D building=3D20 substantial buildings until 10-30 years into their =3D existence.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In one Minnesota town, for =3D instance, there=3D20 was one Mennonite Church, in about 1885 there was a split over, among =3D other=3D20 things, using instruments to accompany what had been plainsong (10 years = =3D later=3D20 the original church decided to use piano too, they now have a pipe=3D20 organ),&nbsp;&nbsp;By 1900 this town of less than 1,000 people wound up = =3D with 5=3D20 Mennonite churches, 1 Lutheran, 1 Presbyterian, and 1Christian and =3D Missionary=3D20 Alliance church.&nbsp; The point is churches constantly have split =3D through the=3D20 American history and new ones constantly open and old ones split or =3D close.=3D20 </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2></FONT><FONT size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Oh, by the way,&nbsp;I checked your web site =3D &nbsp;Nice=3D20 Dogs!!</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Jeff Korns<BR><A=3D20 href=3D3D"http://members.home.net/jakorns/">http://members.home.net/jakorns= =3D /</A></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"><FONT=3D20 face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT lang=3D3D0 face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#000000 =3D size=3D3D2=3D20 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF">.... and the list goes on. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The = =3D midwest is=3D20 full of small churches with <BR>their original pipe organs from this =3D period.=3D20 &nbsp;Your statements are misleading <BR>about the number of churches = =3D that did=3D20 NOT have pipe organs. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Of course, <BR>there are many = =3D very=3D20 small churches in the country that were too small for any =3D <BR>instrument,=3D20 barely large enough to accommodate more than four or five =3D <BR>families.=3D20 <BR><BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~=3D20 &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D20 <BR></FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0008_01C11200.6C3CABE0--    
(back) Subject: Re: small churches and "catalog" organs From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2001 17:15:43 EDT   Hi Bud:   I had a facsililie 1889 Sears-Roebuck Catalogue that listed Reed organs Price range: $39.95 to $89.95 Parlor to small church size. I think they were Mason-Hamlin organs.   Ron  
(back) Subject: Re: small churches and "catalog" organs From: "Jeffery Korns" <jakorns@home.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2001 16:21:55 -0500   Up until the proliferation of cheap piano makers in the mid 20th century, the reed organ was common in many homes too. Why? not because of ecclesiastical goodness, but simple durability of construction and cost. Only the wealthier homes could afford the pianos or piano fortes (and piano tuners were few and far between), but reed organs were cheaper and more common. But the average reed organ does not compare with an average pipe organ. Again this was economics, NOT theology. Jeff Korns http://members.home.net/jakorns/    
(back) Subject: proliferation of organs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2001 14:36:06 -0700     --------------67CC3F2EFF75C714440EA4E7 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit       Jeffery Korns wrote:   > Gee Bruce, The churches you listed are east of the Mississippi. I > conceded the fact that many of the churches there are older and more > established. > > As I said, I'd base it less on that than on where the railroads went. > I come from a church background that is common in this section of > the country (for smaller churches). And reed organs were used, > (because prior to 1920 they cost less and were more dependable than > pianos). But the wholesale organ (as we know it) explosion did not > occur until after WWII. If you study the history of American > religion (and this includes all groups such as the > > Amish, > > didn't use organs ... > > Mennonites, > > Quakers, > > didn't use organs ... > > Bretheren, > > Mormons) > > erected a pipe organ in the Tabernacle in Salt Lake almost as soon as > they arrived, though it's less clear how common organs were in the > early stake-houses. > > you will find that many churches were transitory in nature. Often > they split or merged and were not concerned with building substantial > buildings until 10-30 years into their existence. > > I can't agree with that ... historically the church (and the saloon) > were the first two buildings to go up in a town (grin) ... the church > often doubled as the school-house. > In one Minnesota town, for instance, there was one Mennonite > Church, in about 1885 there was a split over, among other things, > using instruments to accompany what had been plainsong (10 years later > the original church decided to use piano too, they now have a pipe > organ), By 1900 this town of less than 1,000 people wound up with 5 > Mennonite churches, 1 Lutheran, 1 Presbyterian, and 1Christian and > Missionary Alliance church. The point is churches constantly have > split through the American history and new ones constantly open and > old ones split or close. > > And MOST of 'em aspired to have ... ORGANS! (grin) >   Cheers,   Bud   --------------67CC3F2EFF75C714440EA4E7 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> <body bgcolor=3D"#FFFFFF"> &nbsp; <p>Jeffery Korns wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><style></style> <font size=3D-1>Gee Bruce,</font><font size=3D-1>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The churches you listed are east of the Mississippi.&nbsp; I conceded the fact that many of the churches there are older and more = established.</font><font size=3D-1></font> <p><b><i><font size=3D-1>As I said, I'd base it less on that than on where the railroads went.</font></i></b> <br><font size=3D-1></font>&nbsp;<font size=3D-1>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I come from a church background that is common in this section of the country (for smaller churches).&nbsp; And reed organs were used, (because prior to 1920 they cost less and were more dependable than pianos).&nbsp; But the wholesale organ (as we know it) explosion did not occur until after WWII.</font><font size=3D-1>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; If you study the history of American religion (and this includes all groups such as the</font><font = size=3D-1></font> <p><font size=3D-1>Amish,</font><font size=3D-1></font> <p><b><i><font size=3D-1>didn't use organs ...</font></i></b><font = size=3D-1></font> <p><font size=3D-1>Mennonites,</font><font size=3D-1></font> <p><font size=3D-1>Quakers,</font><font size=3D-1></font> <p><b><i><font size=3D-1>didn't use organs ...</font></i></b><font = size=3D-1></font> <p><font size=3D-1>Bretheren,</font><font size=3D-1></font> <p><font size=3D-1>Mormons)</font><font size=3D-1></font> <p><b><i><font size=3D-1>erected a pipe organ in the Tabernacle in Salt = Lake almost as soon as they arrived, though it's less clear how common organs were in the early stake-houses.</font></i></b><font size=3D-1></font> <p><font size=3D-1>you will find that many churches were transitory in = nature.&nbsp; Often they split or merged and were not concerned with building substantial buildings until 10-30 years into their existence.</font><font = size=3D-1></font> <p><b><i><font size=3D-1>I can't agree with that ... historically the = church (and the saloon) were the first two buildings to go up in a town (grin) .... the church often doubled as the school-house.</font></i></b> <br><font size=3D-1></font>&nbsp;<font size=3D-1>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In one Minnesota town, for instance, there was one Mennonite Church, in about 1885 there was a split over, among other things, using instruments to = accompany what had been plainsong (10 years later the original church decided to use piano too, they now have a pipe organ),&nbsp; By 1900 this town of less than 1,000 people wound up with 5 Mennonite churches, 1 Lutheran, 1 Presbyterian, and 1Christian and Missionary Alliance church.&nbsp; The point is churches constantly have split through the American history and new ones constantly open and old ones split or close.</font><font = size=3D-1></font> <p><b><i><font size=3D-1>And MOST of 'em aspired to have ... ORGANS! = (grin)</font></i></b> <br><font size=3D-1></font>&nbsp;</blockquote> Cheers, <p>Bud </body> </html>   --------------67CC3F2EFF75C714440EA4E7--    
(back) Subject: Re: Perils of Pianos in church From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2001 18:37:49 EDT     --part1_b7.11033a5c.288b5e3d_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 7/21/01 5:14:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = jakorns@home.com writes:     > The churches you listed are east of the Mississippi. I conceded the = fact > that many of the churches there are older and more established. > I come from a church background that is common in this section of = the > country (for smaller churches). And reed organs were used, (because = prior > to 1920 they cost less and were more dependable than pianos). But the > wholesale organ (as we know it) explosion did not occur until after = WWII. >   I unfortunately don't have the Iowa convention booklet, but I understand = that that area of the country is one of the "hottest" areas for old organs in little churches. It seems that you are generalizing based upon a limited exposure in your area.. I think if you got in touch with OHS or did some =   large scale exploring your eyes would be opened.   I have no doubt that many "wholesale organs" were introduced after WWII. =   When that explosion hit, "that stuff" splattered all over the country. = ;-) Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi Visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_b7.11033a5c.288b5e3d_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 7/21/01 5:14:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time, jakorns@home.com <BR>writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The churches you = listed are east of the Mississippi. &nbsp;I conceded the fact <BR>that many of the churches there are older and more established. <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I come from a church background that is common in = this section of the <BR>country (for smaller churches). &nbsp;And reed organs were used, = (because prior <BR>to 1920 they cost less and were more dependable than pianos). = &nbsp;But the <BR>wholesale organ (as we know it) explosion did not occur until after = WWII. <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>I unfortunately don't have the Iowa convention booklet, but I = understand that <BR>that area of the country is one of the "hottest" areas for old organs = in <BR>little churches. &nbsp;It seems that you are generalizing based upon a = limited <BR>exposure in your area.. &nbsp;&nbsp;I think if you got in touch with = OHS or did some <BR>large scale exploring your eyes would be opened. <BR> <BR>I have no doubt that many "wholesale organs" were introduced after = WWII. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>When that explosion hit, "that stuff" splattered all over the country. = &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly, and Dewi <BR>Visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/</FONT></HTML>   --part1_b7.11033a5c.288b5e3d_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: small churches and "catalog" organs From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2001 19:16:43 -0500       RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Hi Bud: > > I had a facsililie 1889 Sears-Roebuck Catalogue that listed Reed organs > Price range: $39.95 to $89.95 Parlor to small church size. I think they > were Mason-Hamlin organs.   but we need to keep in mind that in this period the average skilled worker earned probably no more than $1.00 per day, and perhaps considerably less. This is balanced by the fact that this was the only entertainment expense for most people--no football or hockey, unless you were playing it yourself; no motion pictures; no radio; no television; no recorded music, to speak of--Edison may have invented the sound recording device by then, but I doubt it was common, and recordings were not yet available in any significant quantity.)   In short, it was a period, where if one wanted to entertain oneself, one made music oneself, either alone (piano, organ), or as part of a group (band, choir). Every establishment of any size had a band or a choir, and above a certain size had both, and every establishment had a march written for it, or dedicated to it. The best known survivor of this genre, is the "Washington Post March", written by Sousa for the Newspaper of the same name.