PipeChat Digest #2266 - Thursday, July 26, 2001
 
Re: project update - question(s)
  by "westbach" <westbach@t-online.de>
Re: unbelievable
  by "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net>
question(s) - ANSWERS
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
Where the ORGAN is KING! POE Danbury(1)
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: question(s) - ANSWERS -and another question
  by "westbach" <westbach@t-online.de>
Re: question(s) - ANSWERS -and another question
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #2257 - 07/23/01
  by <RJAYWILL@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: project update - question(s) From: "westbach" <westbach@t-online.de> Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 22:34:59 +0200   Dear Mr. Terry,   I would like to ask you a couple of questions about your organ project. First, why did you not include a true string stop in your instrument? Is = the Gemshorn "stringy"?   Second, you speak of a Clarabella flute - under what name is this flute in = the stop list (why do you not call it a Clarabella flute?)?   Thank you for the info.   Sincerely, Sam Westbrook        
(back) Subject: Re: unbelievable From: "Wayne Grauel" <wgvideo@attglobal.net> Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 16:59:43 -0400   snip............................................. Justin, I am more concerned with THIS statement than with the one about organ. Suddenly worship is, if I read it right, "God, listen to us, we = have an agenda for you to fulfill."   Speaking TO God is certainly appropriate for worship, but so is speaking about Him. More importantly, is God speaking TO us. Good worship music, regardless of style, does all 3. snip....................................................................   Simply more self fulfilling arrogance in the form of modern contemporary = worship   I think they have lost sight that: "Music is a gift <of or from> God to = Man" So, I doubt if God is impressed!   The more I hear of LCMS foolishness the more I really get upset, but I = know it's all over. They were always the conservative backbone of Lutherans, but no one is = immune form this plague!   Wayne Grauel You've heard of "Sleepless in Seattle", well, I'm "Disgusted in Maryland"!    
(back) Subject: question(s) - ANSWERS From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 14:03:59 -0700 (PDT)   --0-1315121884-996181439=3D:43286 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii     First of all we have a VERY limited amount of space (not to mention = money.) There was a question of prioritys, and what kind of quality used = pipes were available. The organ already had a Gemshorn and Celeste. The = Gemshorn has been re-regulated so it is a nice very broad warm sound, = slightly softer than the Great 8' Principal. We decided to add the Oboe = (1969 Durst, or Trumpet was made by Durst as well.) Then we decided to = complete the flutes and mutations, and finally the organ needed a tuning = stop for the enclosed section so we ordered a Principal from Tom Anderson. = This is voiced with a bit of "speech" to contrast with the exposed = Principal which has moderate nicking that I did not want to change. The 1915 Austin Clarabella has been de-nicked, and the cut-ups lowered by = adding a metal upper lip. In the tenor range is has an almost hybrid = sound, and by the time you get to Middle C there is quite a bit of chiff. = When I see "Clarabella" I think of a totally different sound. In the upper = register it is a definite open wood flute and just soars in our room. On = the other hand, the 1928 Aeolian Gedeckt from the Calvary Pres. in San = Francisco is kept more like it was originally voiced. The nicking has been = filled, but the wind pressure is much lower then original and the chiff is = barely detectable. The church has organ chambers in the chancel (this organ is located in the = gallery with the choir) that will hold about 45 ranks, and if somewhere = down the road there is any real money we will relocate the choir, along = with a larger used organ in the English style there, but for now, this is = it. We have about $900.00 of the 20K we need to update all the switching = and console systems to Peterson.     Randy Terry Minister of Music, Organist & Choirmaster The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California www.stpetersrwc.org     --------------------------------- Do You Yahoo!? Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger http://phonecard.yahoo.com/ --0-1315121884-996181439=3D:43286 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii   <P>&nbsp;First of all we have a VERY limited amount of space (not to = mention money.) There was a question of prioritys, and what kind of = quality used pipes were available. The organ already had a Gemshorn and = Celeste. The Gemshorn has been re-regulated so it is a nice very broad = warm sound, slightly softer than the Great 8' Principal. We decided to add = the Oboe (1969 Durst, or Trumpet was made by Durst as well.) Then we = decided to complete the flutes and mutations, and finally the organ needed = a tuning stop for the enclosed section so we ordered a Principal from Tom = Anderson. This is voiced with a bit of "speech" to contrast with the = exposed Principal which has moderate nicking that I did not want to = change. <P>The 1915 Austin Clarabella has been de-nicked, and the cut-ups lowered = by adding a metal upper lip. In the tenor range is has an almost hybrid = sound, and by the time you get to Middle C there is quite a bit of chiff. = When I see "Clarabella" I think of a totally different sound. In the upper = register it is a definite open wood flute and just soars in our room. On = the other hand, the 1928 Aeolian Gedeckt from the Calvary Pres. in San = Francisco is kept more like it was originally voiced. The nicking has been = filled, but the wind pressure is much lower then original and the chiff is = barely detectable. <P>The church has organ chambers in the chancel (this organ is located in = the gallery with the choir) that will hold about 45 ranks, and if = somewhere down the road there is any real money we will relocate the = choir, along with a larger used organ in the English style there, but for = now, this is it. We have about $900.00 of the 20K we need to update all = the switching and console systems to Peterson.</P><BR><BR>Randy = Terry<br>Minister of Music, Organist &amp; Choirmaster<br>The Episcopal = Church of St. Peter<br>Redwood City, = California<br>www.stpetersrwc.org<p><br><hr size=3D1><b>Do You Yahoo!?</b><br> Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! = Messenger<BR><a = href=3D"http://phonecard.yahoo.com/?.refer=3Dmailtagline">http://phonecard.= yahoo.com/</a> --0-1315121884-996181439=3D:43286--  
(back) Subject: Where the ORGAN is KING! POE Danbury(1) From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 18:24:18 EDT     --part1_da.9a38e0b.2891f292_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Lists and Friends,   Many of us have heard about Pipe Organ Encounters but not many of us have experienced one, because it is not a huge program. In any given summer, there may be three or four of them in various parts of the country, each perhaps involving about 50 people, students and faculty. I have now become one of the blessed, which may sound a bit fanciful, but think in terms of spending a totally unreal week in a society for which the Pipe Organ is the most important thing there is (followed in our case by the pool table in the dorm!)! The people of this society are mostly young, from perhaps ten years old to late teen-age and a bit beyond, with a faculty of people from their early 20s all the way up to the likes of me! That's a full spectrum!   How did this come to happen in Danbury, Connecticut, Charles Ives Country? In this case, it was the determination of Stephen Roberts, no stranger to the Internet Organ lists, and faculty member at Western Connecticut State University, which place became our most hospitable home for six magical days. He sought and was offered support from three area AGO chapters, Fairfield West (Western Fairfield County, CT), Waterbury (CT), and New York City, and these became the sponsoring organizations. The planning work began rather long ago. I cannot recall when our first committee meeting was, but it wasn't yesterday. We had to have almost all the ducks in a row early, in order to fully participate in the opportunities provided by the National AGO Office, this including the excellent joint promotion and publicity for all four POE programs in "The American Organist" magazine. We also needed to satisfy the requirements of the AGO, developed from long experience, in order to receive helpful financial support available to us. At our early meetings, we produced our brochure, which had to be approved by National. Stephen, all the while, was in negotiation with his university, generally known as WestConn, over housing and food. They, we learned, are not strangers to summer music camps, and to many other summer programs. The mechanisms are well-practiced, and this became clear throughout the week. The dorms are comfortable, good supervision was provided, the food is abundant and good, and the price was right! So, all we needed was people, and they did indeed appear. We had 24 students and a splendid faculty of 12, and it was apparent right from registration day (Sunday, July 15th) that this was to be a spirited and congenial group, our community for six intense days.   Registration began at 2 p.m., with Registrar/Treasurer Marilyn Ballantine signing everyone in. Foundry Music of New Haven brought along a good display of the sort of music and books the students and faculty might want to look at and/or own, and this proved to be of great interest. In pairs, the students had four days of lessons with some practice time as well. Stephen Rapp (St. John's Lutheran, Stamford) was around to explain how (and where) that would work. Students trickled in until about 5 p.m., dorm monitors taking them to their rooms, which had the occupants' names on brightly colored signs on the doors. The parents gradually forced themselves to leave, and the getting-acquainted process continued over pizza in the spacious lounge (with that pool table) in the dorm. Joining us for most of the afternoon and evening was James Thomasshower, Executive Director of the National AGO, who also showed his great interest in this program later in the week.   Appropriately, the first official POE event was an organ recital, given by two young faculty members, Tom Trenney and Paul Jacobs. This was at the handsome (visually and acoustically) St. Peter RC Church on Main Street in Danbury, where Stephen Roberts is Director of Music. The Peragallo organ gave a good account of itself, and it certainly had its work cut out for it with these two fabulous young players playing an enormous number of notes! What a wonderful, high standard of playing was placed before the assembled students, setting the tone for the entire week, and, for the record, no printed music ever appeared on the music desk that evening! The construction of the program itself was a masterwork, a combination of lots of meat and potatoes with some lovely desserts thrown in. The program:   PAUL JACOBS: Fantasia for Organ (1983) . . . John Weaver. This is a wonderful work, in four sections, not listed, but I called them as follows: 1. Allegro 2. A ravishing section for Flute accompanied on Strings with some "raindrop" figurations. 3. Cornet solo, later to Oboe, over Strings. 4. A big, arpeggiated toccata beginning with a mordent very like that of BWV 565 - was I hallucinating? I am glad to have had a chance to hear this work.   TOM TRENNEY: 1. The Tortoise and the Hare . . . Jennifer Conner - great fun, with amusing clusters of notes. We were asked to guess who won! 2. Count Your Blessings, arranged by Dan Miller. This was delightful, roller rink type stuff in the theater organ style. Really intricate, really interesting, and - fun!   PAUL: 1. Fantasie in f minor, K. 594 . . . Mozart. Paul spoke of Mozart's personal difficulties at this time of his life, reflected, he thinks, in the somber outer movements, with the inner movement more like the bouyant Mozart we know and love. [I love the somber Mozart as well.] Then, with no space or applause between, Paul launched right into the frenetic and wonderfully relentless Bach Sinfonia from Cantata 29. Brilliant!   TOM: The Last Rose of Summer, Opus 59 . . . Dudley Buck, edited by Barbara Owen. Tom told us that this was written at a time when organ recitals were very popular, and often contained variations on popular tunes which, in those "hands on" days, would have been played by many listeners on the piano in the parlor. I have heard this piece before, and also know it from David Craighead's recording, but it had never done much for me until this performance by Tom, who does seem to make a convincing case for all he plays.   PAUL: Gave us something of his declared favorite composer, Olivier Messaien, after some very good descriptive notes. Birds and Fountains from the Pentecost Mass.   TOM: Variations on "America:" . . . Charles Ives, Danbury's great composer. The only other organist I have heard play these with the perfect and requisite jauntiness was Simon Preston, who brought a dose of British "camp" to the proceedings. Tom's not even British, but by golly, he's got it. It was great fun. I don't know that we ever made anything of the Ives/Danbury connection at the time, so by the end of the week, when we actually visited the house in which Ives was born, I am not sure the students remembered and made the connection. Goodness knows, they heard a huge amount of music in the inter- vening days. The penny will drop some day!   Well now, recital over with much applause for these two really stunning young players - Tom Trenney - Paul Jacobs - go hear them whenever and wherever you can - and then, a most amazing thing happened. Stephen Roberts announced to all that it was "open console" time! Many had music and shoes with them, and there was this incredible forward movement, Lemmings inexorably heading for the sea, a surging forward, not competitive, not to get there first - just to get to the = console. Anyone who wanted had a chance to play, and there was some amazing playing from some very young people who had clearly worked very hard, and some less advanced playing from others who were newer at the game, but everyone helped everyone else - page turning, registrations, etc., until all had drunk their fill. It went on much longer than the = recital itself, and it was a scene repeated often after this. And all of this was about a PIPE ORGAN!!   Tomorrow: Orientation, First Lessons, and an elegant Faculty Recital!   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com           --part1_da.9a38e0b.2891f292_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>Dear Lists and Friends, <BR> <BR>Many of us have heard about Pipe Organ Encounters but not many of us <BR>have experienced one, because it is not a huge program. In any given <BR>summer, there may be three or four of them in various parts of the <BR>country, each perhaps involving about 50 people, students and faculty. <BR>I have now become one of the blessed, which may sound a bit fanciful, <BR>but think in terms of spending a totally unreal week in a society for <BR>which the Pipe Organ is the most important thing there is (followed in <BR>our case by the pool table in the dorm!)! The people of this society = are <BR>mostly young, from perhaps ten years old to late teen-age and a bit <BR>beyond, with a faculty of people from their early 20s all the way up = to <BR>the likes of me! That's a full spectrum! <BR> <BR>How did this come to happen in Danbury, Connecticut, Charles Ives <BR>Country? In this case, it was the determination of Stephen Roberts, <BR>no stranger to the Internet Organ lists, and faculty member at Western <BR>Connecticut State University, which place became our most hospitable <BR>home for six magical days. He sought and was offered support from = three <BR>area AGO chapters, Fairfield West (Western Fairfield County, CT), <BR>Waterbury (CT), and New York City, and these became the sponsoring <BR>organizations. The planning work began rather long ago. I cannot = recall <BR>when our first committee meeting was, but it wasn't yesterday. We had <BR>to have almost all the ducks in a row early, in order to fully = participate <BR>in the opportunities provided by the National AGO Office, this = including <BR>the excellent joint promotion and publicity for all four POE programs = in <BR>"The American Organist" magazine. We also needed to satisfy the <BR>requirements of the AGO, developed from long experience, in order to <BR>receive helpful financial support available to us. At our early = meetings, <BR>we produced our brochure, which had to be approved by National. <BR>Stephen, all the while, was in negotiation with his university, = generally <BR>known as WestConn, over housing and food. They, we learned, are <BR>not strangers to summer music camps, and to many other summer <BR>programs. The mechanisms are well-practiced, and this became clear = &nbsp; <BR>throughout the week. The dorms are comfortable, good supervision was <BR>provided, the food is abundant and good, and the price was right! So, <BR>all we needed was people, and they did indeed appear. We had 24 = students <BR>and a splendid faculty of 12, and it was apparent right from = registration <BR>day (Sunday, July 15th) that this was to be a spirited and congenial <BR>group, our community for six intense days. <BR> <BR>Registration began at 2 p.m., with Registrar/Treasurer Marilyn <BR>Ballantine signing everyone in. Foundry Music of New Haven brought <BR>along a good display of the sort of music and books the students and <BR>faculty might want to look at and/or own, and this proved to be of <BR>great interest. In pairs, the students had four days of lessons with <BR>some practice time as well. Stephen Rapp (St. John's Lutheran, <BR>Stamford) was around to explain how (and where) that would work. <BR>Students trickled in until about 5 p.m., dorm monitors taking them to <BR>their rooms, which had the occupants' names on brightly colored <BR>signs on the doors. The parents gradually forced themselves to <BR>leave, and the getting-acquainted process continued over pizza in <BR>the spacious lounge (with that pool table) in the dorm. Joining us for <BR>most of the afternoon and evening was James Thomasshower, <BR>Executive Director of the National AGO, who also showed his <BR>great interest in this program later in the week. <BR> <BR>Appropriately, the first official POE event was an organ recital, = given <BR>by two young faculty members, Tom Trenney and Paul Jacobs. This <BR>was at the handsome (visually and acoustically) St. Peter RC Church <BR>on Main Street in Danbury, where Stephen Roberts is Director of <BR>Music. The Peragallo organ gave a good account of itself, and it <BR>certainly had its work cut out for it with these two fabulous young <BR>players playing an enormous number of notes! What a wonderful, high <BR>standard of playing was placed before the assembled students, setting <BR>the tone for the entire week, and, for the record, no printed music = ever <BR>appeared on the music desk that evening! The construction of the = program <BR>itself was a masterwork, a combination of lots of meat and potatoes <BR>with some lovely desserts thrown in. The program: <BR> <BR>PAUL JACOBS: Fantasia for Organ (1983) . . . John Weaver. This is a <BR>wonderful work, in four sections, not listed, but I called them as <BR>follows: 1. Allegro &nbsp;2. A ravishing section for Flute accompanied = on <BR>Strings with some "raindrop" figurations. 3. Cornet solo, later to = Oboe, <BR>over Strings. 4. A big, arpeggiated toccata beginning with a mordent <BR>very like that of BWV 565 - was I hallucinating? I am glad to have had <BR>a chance to hear this work. <BR> <BR>TOM TRENNEY: 1. The Tortoise and the Hare . . . Jennifer Conner - <BR>great fun, with amusing clusters of notes. We were asked to guess <BR>who won! 2. Count Your Blessings, arranged by Dan Miller. This was <BR>delightful, roller rink type stuff in the theater organ style. Really <BR>intricate, really interesting, and - fun! <BR> <BR>PAUL: 1. Fantasie in f minor, K. 594 . . . Mozart. Paul spoke of <BR>Mozart's personal difficulties at this time of his life, reflected, he <BR>thinks, in the somber outer movements, with the inner movement <BR>more like the bouyant Mozart we know and love. [I love the somber <BR>Mozart as well.] Then, with no space or applause between, Paul <BR>launched right into the frenetic and wonderfully relentless Bach <BR>Sinfonia from Cantata 29. Brilliant! <BR> <BR>TOM: The Last Rose of Summer, Opus 59 . . . Dudley Buck, edited <BR>by Barbara Owen. Tom told us that this was written at a time when <BR>organ recitals were very popular, and often contained variations on <BR>popular tunes which, in those "hands on" days, would have been played <BR>by many listeners on the piano in the parlor. I have heard this piece <BR>before, and also know it from David Craighead's recording, but it had <BR>never done much for me until this performance by Tom, who does seem <BR>to make a convincing case for all he plays. <BR> <BR>PAUL: Gave us something of his declared favorite composer, Olivier <BR>Messaien, after some very good descriptive notes. Birds and Fountains <BR>from the Pentecost Mass. <BR> <BR>TOM: Variations on "America:" . . . Charles Ives, Danbury's great <BR>composer. The only other organist I have heard play these with the <BR>perfect and requisite jauntiness was Simon Preston, who brought a <BR>dose of British "camp" to the proceedings. Tom's not even British, but <BR>by golly, he's got it. It was great fun. I don't know that we ever = made <BR>anything of the Ives/Danbury connection at the time, so by the end <BR>of the week, when we actually visited the house in which Ives was = born, <BR>I am not sure the students remembered and made the connection. <BR>Goodness knows, they heard a huge amount of music in the inter- <BR>vening days. The penny will drop some day! <BR> <BR>Well now, recital over with much applause for these two really = stunning <BR>young players - Tom Trenney - Paul Jacobs - go hear them whenever <BR>and wherever you can - and then, a most amazing thing happened. <BR>Stephen Roberts announced to all that it was "open console" time! <BR>Many had music and shoes with them, and there was this incredible <BR>forward movement, Lemmings inexorably heading for the sea, a surging <BR>forward, not competitive, not to get there first - just to get to the = console. <BR>Anyone who wanted had a chance to play, and there was some amazing <BR>playing from some very young people who had clearly worked very hard, <BR>and some less advanced playing from others who were newer at the <BR>game, but everyone helped everyone else - page turning, registrations, <BR>etc., until all had drunk their fill. It went on much longer than the = recital <BR>itself, and it was a scene repeated often after this. And all of this = was <BR>about a PIPE ORGAN!! <BR> <BR>Tomorrow: Orientation, First Lessons, and an elegant Faculty Recital! <BR> <BR>Cheers, <BR> <BR>Malcolm Wechsler <BR>www.mander-organs.com <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_da.9a38e0b.2891f292_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: question(s) - ANSWERS -and another question From: "westbach" <westbach@t-online.de> Date: Fri, 27 Jul 2001 00:29:54 +0200   Dear Mr. Terry,   Thanks for the info. So the Hohlfl=F6te pipes are the former Clarabella?   Sincerely, Sam Westbrook      
(back) Subject: Re: question(s) - ANSWERS -and another question From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 17:04:17 -0700 (PDT)   --0-844528408-996192257=3D:49421 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii     Yeah. Remember how in the late 50's and 60's Moller and Austin called = Melodias the like Hohlflute to make them more fadish, I guess. This = revoiced stop just does not sound like a hooty old 20's stop any more so I = did not lable it that way, but the restored pipework, freshly lacqured, = clearly say "Clarabella," and the builder cleverly inscribed the builder, = opus number, and location of the original organ on the pipe feet on the = low C's. Actually, the Clarabella bass is from a 1908 Kimball tubular = pneumatic, and the extension from 4' up of the pedal Subbass are teens = Murray Harris pipes, but I have not gotten to them yet. Part of the goal = is to enhance the original intent of organist that oversaw the = installation. The sound is a squarely American Classic sound in spite of = the very neo baroque stoplist. We have just taken the natural next step in = completing the instrument. Hopefully we can expand the exposed Principals = 8 and 4 to include their own Mixture, a biggish reed, and a Harmonic westbach <westbach@t-online.de> wrote: Thanks for the info. So the Hohlfl=F6te pipes are the former Clarabella?   Sincerely, Sam Westbrook         "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org       Randy Terry Minister of Music, Organist & Choirmaster The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California www.stpetersrwc.org     --------------------------------- Do You Yahoo!? Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger http://phonecard.yahoo.com/ --0-844528408-996192257=3D:49421 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii   <P> <FONT color=3Dblue>Yeah. Remember how in the late 50's and 60's Moller = and Austin called Melodias the like Hohlflute to make them more fadish, I = guess. This revoiced stop just does not sound like a hooty old 20's stop = any more so I did not lable it that way, but the restored pipework, = freshly lacqured, clearly say "Clarabella," and the builder cleverly = inscribed the builder, opus number, and location of the original organ on = the pipe feet on the low C's. Actually, the Clarabella bass is from a 1908 = Kimball tubular pneumatic, and the extension from 4' up of the pedal = Subbass are teens Murray Harris pipes, but I have not gotten to them yet. = Part of the goal is to enhance the original intent of organist that = oversaw the installation. The sound is a squarely American Classic sound = in spite of the very neo baroque stoplist. We have just taken the natural = next step in completing the instrument. Hopefully we can expand the = exposed Principals 8 and 4 to include their own Mixture, a biggish r <P><B><I>westbach &lt;westbach@t-online.de&gt;</I></B> wrote: <BR>Thanks = for the info. So the Hohlfl=F6te pipes are the former = Clarabella?<BR><BR>Sincerely, <BR>Sam Westbrook<BR><BR><BR><BR><BR>"Pipe = Up and Be Heard!"<BR>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs = &amp; related topics<BR>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org<BR>List: = mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org<BR>Administration: = mailto:admin@pipechat.org<BR>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: = mailto:requests@pipechat.org<BR></P><BR><BR>Randy Terry<br>Minister of = Music, Organist &amp; Choirmaster<br>The Episcopal Church of St. = Peter<br>Redwood City, California<br>www.stpetersrwc.org<p><br><hr = size=3D1><b>Do You Yahoo!?</b><br> Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! = Messenger<BR><a = href=3D"http://phonecard.yahoo.com/?.refer=3Dmailtagline">http://phonecard.= yahoo.com/</a> --0-844528408-996192257=3D:49421--  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2257 - 07/23/01 From: <RJAYWILL@aol.com> Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 22:08:05 EDT   I don't think that that is true. Christ Upon the Mountain Peak would be = much easier to teach any congregation than something like City of God, which I have never heard sung correctly by anyone including some pretty expensive cantors.   R Jay Williamson