PipeChat Digest #2270 - Saturday, July 28, 2001
 
Organ Literature Foundation
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
CT POE (2)- Lessons & Faculty Recital!  7/16
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Fw: reply email addy?
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Thanks for the Help
  by "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
Re: project update
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Pedal Cornet/Resultant 32' Reed
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Pedal Cornet/Resultant 32' Reed
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Silent Movie drew an enthusiastic crowd (crossposted)
  by "Jon C." <opus1100@catoe.org>
 

(back) Subject: Organ Literature Foundation From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 06:23:22 EDT     --part1_23.f07e3c1.2893ec9a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 7/28/2001 12:50:49 AM Eastern Daylight Time, mack02445@mindspring.com writes:     > Anyone have the URL or phone # for the Organ Literature Foundation? > Phone 781-848-1388   E-mail < organlitfnd@juno.com >   I haven't seen a URL, and don't know if they have a website.   Cheers,   Malcolm   --part1_23.f07e3c1.2893ec9a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 7/28/2001 12:50:49 AM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>mack02445@mindspring.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Anyone have the = URL or phone # for the Organ Literature Foundation? <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Phone 781-848-1388 <BR> <BR>E-mail &nbsp;&lt; organlitfnd@juno.com &gt; <BR> <BR>I haven't seen a URL, and don't know if they have a website. <BR> <BR>Cheers, <BR> <BR>Malcolm</FONT></HTML>   --part1_23.f07e3c1.2893ec9a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: CT POE (2)- Lessons & Faculty Recital! 7/16 From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 09:17:52 EDT     --part1_59.db58974.28941580_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Lists and Friends,   After breakfast this day, the bus arrived at 9:30 to take the beginners to First Congregational Church and the more advanced students to Immanuel Lutheran Church, both in Danbury. Tom Trenney and Paul Jacobs gave the beginners something of an introduction to the organ, both generically and also to the church's Aeolian-Skinner organ. Todd Wilson, who had arrived in town late last night, gave a general orientation to the experienced students. This was the only part of the week's program I had to miss, due to the press of other business, but knowing the personalities involved, the time was well spent. The organ at Immanuel is a Moller that contains the original Principal Chorus upon which Charles Ives often played. I have forgotten what kind of organ those pipes came from, but Kevin Warnken, organist of the church told us they were there over Moller's protest. The church insisted they be kept. The church once across the way, First Baptist, was the site of Ives's world premiere of his Variations on America - he was all of 14 years old! It is perhaps happenstance that on the site of First Baptist =   is now a Bank of Danbury, founded by Charles's father.   I managed to arrive on campus in time for lunch, and I have to say, if you come to WestConn for no other reason, come for the food! Amongst all the many choices, there is nothing missing. I am really not sure how the food service manages to do what it does for what they charged the POE.   During the week, we had a wonderfully wide variety of musical experiences, each of which took on its own glow. However, it is probably correct that the real core of the POE experience is the daily teaching, four days of it, from a distinguished faculty, which I am about to introduce - in alphabetical order, to avoid connotations of more or less importance. I thought either way I would end up last, but actually, doing it alphabetically, I gain a position!   MICHAEL BURNETTE - Church of Christ and the Holy Trinity, Westport, CT.   MARIA COFFIN - Trinity Episcopal Church, Newtown, CT   PAUL JACOBS - Graduate Student at Yale University, famous recently for his 18 hour marathon performances of the complete works for Organ of J. S. Bach.   JOHN KING - Director of Music at Hitchcock Memorial Church, Scarsdale, New York   STEPHEN RAPP - Cantor at St. John's Lutheran Church, Stamford, CT. In charge of all aspects of the Organ Teaching program for this Pipe Organ Encounter, and organizer thereof.   STEPHEN ROBERTS - Director of Music at St. Peter Church, Danbury, Music Faculty, Western CT State University. Director of this Pipe Organ Encounter.   MARK SCHOLTZ - Director of Music, St. John's Church, Washington, CT   JOHN STRYBOS - Director of Music, St. Joseph Church, Bronxville, NY   LOIS TOEPPNER - Region One, AGO, Councilor   TOM TRENNEY - Full time Organist at a church in Rochester, and in his last year of graduate study in Choral Conducting at Eastman.   MALCOLM WECHSLER - Director of Music at Trinity Church, Stamford, and U. S. Representative of Mander Organs of London, England.   TODD WILSON - Music Director of Church of the Covenant, Cleveland, OH and Professer of Organ, Cleveland Institute of Music   The above-named people who taught for four POE days received a very small honorarium. Believe me, they were essentially volunteers, and deserve immense credit for the contribution they made to their students and to the entire community. For our work, we had twelve locations, each with a Pipe Organ, and each of us taught two students during a two hour period, accommodating each student as we saw fit within the time. Some time was to be set aside for practice. I was teaching two 13 year old beginners, both with good piano experience, both very eager to learn, both church affiliated, one as a chorister at St. Thomas Fifth Avenue. They each had different technical problems to be dealt with, so there was not much that could be achieved in joint lesson time, as I had hoped there might be. While I worked with one, the other practiced on the piano elsewhere in the church, not ideal, but we made the best of it. Tom Trenney is running a POE in Rochester, beginning on Bastille Day next summer, and I believe he is hoping to have one organ for each student, far easier to achieve in Rochester than it was in the Danbury area. The problem here was finding churches willing or able to say yes to four two hour lesson/practice periods. We were very lucky to have twelve willing churches with decent Pipe Organs!   After another sumptuous dinner(!), we boarded the bus for New Canaan. Listmember Glenda Sutton often talks about her little town in Florida, DeFuniak Springs (which is taking on the importance of Lake Wobegon in our lives) as the place that God forgot. God knows better than to forget New Canaan. She would become the subject of a law suit for sure! New Canaan is perfect, and intends to stay that way. Into this lovely town came, in the 60s, a really elegant and interesting new building for St. Mark's Episcopal Church. The old building was a neat, old wood frame building on a triangular park with three churches, known always as God's Acre. (The e-mail address of at least one church there ends with < godsacre.com >) The old church is now St. Michael's Lutheran. The new is splendid, with elegant details, elegant acoustics, a truly breathtaking reredos/screen behind the altar, through which you see and hear the choir clearly. This screen is loaded with wonderful small sculptures based on Biblical and human events. There are bells, I can't recall how many, in a fine tower set slightly apart from the church, in the tradition of the Italian campanile. One reaches the entrance to the tower through a short bridge from the church balcony. The Austin organ of the 60s speaks well from its position on the east wall, not at all impeded by the screen/reredos. The organist sits at a console, facing his choir, his back to the altar, with the organ bits all above the choir. With that as a still not complete description of this place as a back- ground, join me in listening in on our brief but pungent faculty recital.   MARK SCHOLTZ began with a lovely, understated performance of the Elgar Imperial March, so often conceived in bombast. Surely Mr. Scholtz knows the great cathedral organs of England. Surely Mr. Scholtz must have long acquaintance with the St. Mark's Austin. I have never heard anyone use this organ so wonderfully well. Were I organist of this church, I would make sure to preserve all those piston settings. Did the feet of Father Willis ever walk upon New Canaan's green and pleasant land? Anyway, you have worked out that I really loved this performance! It was fine!   STEPHEN ROBERTS is no stranger to those who read the Pipe Organ Internet lists. He is one of those whose writings one tends to print and keep. Somewhere, somehow, in the midst of all he does, he manages to practice the Organ regularly. I have heard him play perhaps half a dozen times, always an exciting experience. He gave us something I think many of our students may not have heard, the Introduction and Fugue from the Reubke Sonata on the 94th Psalm. Playing the entire work might have overwhelmed the proceedings - the solid excerpts were perfect, and greeted with great applause. "Gee, the Boss really can play" was a comment I actually overheard from one of the students!   TODD WILSON, in another inspired choice, played two of the George Shearing "Sacred Songs," as arranged for Organ by Dale Wood. I have only heard these unconvincingly played, and now I am totally convinced. They were beautifully played and registered, and I found myself loving them, and remembering the gentle jazz idiom of Shearing, who once came to Oberlin and played in the concert series in Finney Chapel! He had a strong congregation of worshippers amongst the Oberlin students.   Already, in three pieces, our audience in New Canaan had kind of an interesting variety of musical experiences! The English Elgar, the German Romantic Reubke, and jazz alla George Shearing. What could happen next?   Well, Wagner, that's what! TOM TRENNEY (Primo) and TODD WILSON, (Secundo) did the Clarence Dickinson - Charlotte Garden four hand transcription of The Ride of the Valkyries! I have heard people do the one organist version with enormous numbers of notes, but hearing it four hands really is rich and fabulous. As they say, it "brought down the house," St. Mark's - too late for Valhalla. It's already gone!   Well, once again, there occurred the great phenomenon of the fast march to the organ console, music and shoes at the ready. It went on as the night before, far longer than the actual recital, with really eager students anxious to try the instrument, and none of them, by the way, are one-piece-people. During the week, we heard them playing many different pieces in many styles. Here is a core of 24 young people devoted to the Organ, all willing to take hours for learning the repertoire, and I suspect you will be hearing more than a few of their names again! This is a great program!   Brian-Paul Thomas, Music Director at St. Mark's had opened up the carillon tower for us, and many of our group made the rather long climb on a very narrow spiral staircase to the top, wherein is found the elegant clavier, where the bells are heard quite directly, and where there is a view all the way to Long Island Sound, perhaps ten miles to the south. Huffing and puffing as I was, I found this little excursion very moving. The bells are gorgeous - I am sorry to have forgotten how many there are.   Tomorrow, we hit New York with a vengeance!! We have dark tales to tell.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler (heading to Chinatown for Dim Sum) www.mander-organs.com                     --part1_59.db58974.28941580_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>Dear Lists and Friends, <BR> <BR>After breakfast this day, the bus arrived at 9:30 to take the = beginners <BR>to First Congregational Church and the more advanced students to <BR>Immanuel Lutheran Church, both in Danbury. Tom Trenney and Paul <BR>Jacobs gave the beginners something of an introduction to the organ, <BR>both generically and also to the church's Aeolian-Skinner organ. Todd <BR>Wilson, who had arrived in town late last night, gave a general <BR>orientation to the experienced students. This was the only part of the <BR>week's program I had to miss, due to the press of other business, but <BR>knowing the personalities involved, the time was well spent. The organ <BR>at Immanuel is a Moller that contains the original Principal Chorus = upon <BR>which Charles Ives often played. I have forgotten what kind of organ <BR>those pipes came from, but Kevin Warnken, organist of the church <BR>told us they were there over Moller's protest. The church insisted = they <BR>be kept. The church once across the way, First Baptist, was the site <BR>of Ives's world premiere of his Variations on America - he was all of <BR>14 years old! It is perhaps happenstance that on the site of First = Baptist <BR>is now a Bank of Danbury, founded by Charles's father. <BR> <BR>I managed to arrive on campus in time for lunch, and I have to say, <BR>if you come to WestConn for no other reason, come for the food! <BR>Amongst all the many choices, there is nothing missing. I am really <BR>not sure how the food service manages to do what it does for what they <BR>charged the POE. <BR> <BR>During the week, we had a wonderfully wide variety of musical <BR>experiences, each of which took on its own glow. However, it is <BR>probably correct that the real core of the POE experience is the daily <BR>teaching, four days of it, from a distinguished faculty, which I am <BR>about to introduce - in alphabetical order, to avoid connotations of <BR>more or less importance. I thought either way I would end up last, but <BR>actually, doing it alphabetically, I gain a position! <BR> <BR>MICHAEL BURNETTE - Church of Christ and the Holy Trinity, Westport, <BR>CT. <BR> <BR>MARIA COFFIN - Trinity Episcopal Church, Newtown, CT <BR> <BR>PAUL JACOBS - Graduate Student at Yale University, famous <BR>recently for his 18 hour marathon performances of the complete <BR>works for Organ of J. S. Bach. <BR> <BR>JOHN KING - Director of Music at Hitchcock Memorial Church, <BR>Scarsdale, New York <BR> <BR>STEPHEN RAPP - Cantor at St. John's Lutheran Church, Stamford, <BR>CT. In charge of all aspects of the Organ Teaching program for this <BR>Pipe Organ Encounter, and organizer thereof. <BR> <BR>STEPHEN ROBERTS - Director of Music at St. Peter Church, Danbury, <BR>Music Faculty, Western CT State University. Director of this Pipe = Organ <BR>Encounter. <BR> <BR>MARK SCHOLTZ - Director of Music, St. John's Church, Washington, CT <BR> <BR>JOHN STRYBOS - Director of Music, St. Joseph Church, Bronxville, NY <BR> <BR>LOIS TOEPPNER - Region One, AGO, Councilor <BR> <BR>TOM TRENNEY - Full time Organist at a church in Rochester, and <BR>in his last year of graduate study in Choral Conducting at Eastman. <BR> <BR>MALCOLM WECHSLER - Director of Music at Trinity Church, Stamford, <BR>and U. S. Representative of Mander Organs of London, England. <BR> <BR>TODD WILSON - Music Director of Church of the Covenant, Cleveland, <BR>OH and Professer of Organ, Cleveland Institute of Music <BR> <BR>The above-named people who taught for four POE days received a very <BR>small honorarium. Believe me, they were essentially volunteers, and <BR>deserve immense credit for the contribution they made to their = students <BR>and to the entire community. For our work, we had twelve locations, <BR>each with a Pipe Organ, and each of us taught two students during a <BR>two hour period, accommodating each student as we saw fit within <BR>the time. Some time was to be set aside for practice. I was teaching <BR>two 13 year old beginners, both with good piano experience, both <BR>very eager to learn, both church affiliated, one as a chorister at St. <BR>Thomas Fifth Avenue. They each had different technical problems to <BR>be dealt with, so there was not much that could be achieved in joint <BR>lesson time, as I had hoped there might be. While I worked with one, <BR>the other practiced on the piano elsewhere in the church, not ideal, <BR>but we made the best of it. Tom Trenney is running a POE in Rochester, <BR>beginning on Bastille Day next summer, and I believe he is hoping <BR>to have one organ for each student, far easier to achieve in Rochester <BR>than it was in the Danbury area. The problem here was finding churches <BR>willing or able to say yes to four two hour lesson/practice periods. = We <BR>were very lucky to have twelve willing churches with decent Pipe = Organs! <BR> <BR>After another sumptuous dinner(!), we boarded the bus for New Canaan. <BR>Listmember Glenda Sutton often talks about her little town in Florida, <BR>DeFuniak Springs (which is taking on the importance of Lake Wobegon <BR>in our lives) as the place that God forgot. God knows better than to <BR>forget New Canaan. She would become the subject of a law suit for = sure! <BR>New Canaan is perfect, and intends to stay that way. Into this lovely <BR>town came, in the 60s, a really elegant and interesting new building <BR>for St. Mark's Episcopal Church. The old building was a neat, old wood <BR>frame building on a triangular park with three churches, known always <BR>as God's Acre. (The e-mail address of at least one church there ends <BR>with &lt; godsacre.com &gt;) The old church is now St. Michael's = Lutheran. <BR>The new is splendid, with elegant details, elegant acoustics, a truly <BR>breathtaking reredos/screen behind the altar, through which you see <BR>and hear the choir clearly. This screen is loaded with wonderful small <BR>sculptures based on Biblical and human events. There are bells, I = can't <BR>recall how many, in a fine tower set slightly apart from the church, in <BR>the tradition of the Italian campanile. One reaches the entrance to = the <BR>tower through a short bridge from the church balcony. The Austin organ <BR>of the 60s speaks well from its position on the east wall, not at all <BR>impeded by the screen/reredos. The organist sits at a console, facing <BR>his choir, his back to the altar, with the organ bits all above the = choir. <BR>With that as a still not complete description of this place as a back- <BR>ground, join me in listening in on our brief but pungent faculty = recital. <BR> <BR>MARK SCHOLTZ began with a lovely, understated performance of the <BR>Elgar Imperial March, so often conceived in bombast. Surely Mr. = Scholtz <BR>knows the great cathedral organs of England. Surely Mr. Scholtz must <BR>have long acquaintance with the St. Mark's Austin. I have never heard <BR>anyone use this organ so wonderfully well. Were I organist of this = church, <BR>I would make sure to preserve all those piston settings. Did the feet = of <BR>Father Willis ever walk upon New Canaan's green and pleasant land? <BR>Anyway, you have worked out that I really loved this performance! <BR>It was fine! <BR> <BR>STEPHEN ROBERTS is no stranger to those who read the Pipe Organ <BR>Internet lists. He is one of those whose writings one tends to print = and <BR>keep. Somewhere, somehow, in the midst of all he does, he manages <BR>to practice the Organ regularly. I have heard him play perhaps half a <BR>dozen times, always an exciting experience. He gave us something I <BR>think many of our students may not have heard, the Introduction and <BR>Fugue from the Reubke Sonata on the 94th Psalm. Playing the <BR>entire work might have overwhelmed the proceedings - the solid <BR>excerpts were perfect, and greeted with great applause. "Gee, the <BR>Boss really can play" was a comment I actually overheard from one <BR>of the students! <BR> <BR>TODD WILSON, in another inspired choice, played two of the George <BR>Shearing "Sacred Songs," as arranged for Organ by Dale Wood. I have <BR>only heard these unconvincingly played, and now I am totally = convinced. <BR>They were beautifully played and registered, and I found myself loving <BR>them, and remembering the gentle jazz idiom of Shearing, who once <BR>came to Oberlin and played in the concert series in Finney Chapel! He <BR>had a strong congregation of worshippers amongst the Oberlin students. <BR> <BR>Already, in three pieces, our audience in New Canaan had kind of an <BR>interesting variety of musical experiences! The English Elgar, the <BR>German Romantic Reubke, and jazz alla George Shearing. What could <BR>happen next? <BR> <BR>Well, Wagner, that's what! TOM TRENNEY (Primo) and TODD WILSON, <BR>(Secundo) did the Clarence Dickinson - Charlotte Garden four hand <BR>transcription of The Ride of the Valkyries! I have heard people do the =   <BR>one organist version with enormous numbers of notes, but hearing it <BR>four hands really is rich and fabulous. As they say, it "brought down <BR>the house," St. Mark's - too late for Valhalla. It's already gone! <BR> <BR>Well, once again, there occurred the great phenomenon of the fast <BR>march to the organ console, music and shoes at the ready. It went on <BR>as the night before, far longer than the actual recital, with really <BR>eager students anxious to try the instrument, and none of them, by <BR>the way, are one-piece-people. During the week, we heard them <BR>playing many different pieces in many styles. Here is a core of 24 <BR>young people devoted to the Organ, all willing to take hours for <BR>learning the repertoire, and I suspect you will be hearing more than <BR>a few of their names again! This is a great program! <BR> <BR>Brian-Paul Thomas, Music Director at St. Mark's had opened up the <BR>carillon tower for us, and many of our group made the rather long = climb <BR>on a very narrow spiral staircase to the top, wherein is found the <BR>elegant clavier, where the bells are heard quite directly, and where <BR>there is a view all the way to Long Island Sound, perhaps ten miles <BR>to the south. Huffing and puffing as I was, I found this little = excursion <BR>very moving. The bells are gorgeous - I am sorry to have forgotten how <BR>many there are. <BR> <BR>Tomorrow, we hit New York with a vengeance!! We have dark tales to = tell. <BR> <BR>Cheers, <BR> <BR>Malcolm Wechsler (heading to Chinatown for Dim Sum) <BR>www.mander-organs.com <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_59.db58974.28941580_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: reply email addy? From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 10:37:46 EDT     --part1_11d.23cfd37.2894283a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 7/27/2001 5:18:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time, dutchorgan@svs.net writes:     > Chemo ain't fun. Got any Beatle > wigs?   Rick, We corresponded some time ago about hooded trumpets, tasteful results, and =   vacuum vs. pressure trems. What's this about chemo? How are you doing?   Steve   --part1_11d.23cfd37.2894283a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 7/27/2001 5:18:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>dutchorgan@svs.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Chemo ain't fun. = Got any Beatle <BR>wigs?</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Rick, <BR>We corresponded some time ago about hooded trumpets, tasteful results, = and <BR>vacuum vs. pressure trems. &nbsp;What's this about chemo? &nbsp;How = are you doing? <BR> <BR>Steve</FONT></HTML>   --part1_11d.23cfd37.2894283a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Thanks for the Help From: "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 12:22:21 -0400   Thank you all fopr the Organ Lit. Foundation email and phone #. I can = always count on these lists to have the answers.   Cheers, Mack      
(back) Subject: Re: project update From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 12:23:09 EDT   In a message dated 7/26/01 1:36:41 PM EST, randyterryus@yahoo.com writes:   > By the way, does anyone know the pitches that make up the first octave = of > the Trumpet Cornet - Moller did this with some success in live rooms = where > the first octave was a 32' harmonics, The Moller harmonics was usually wired out of the Swell flute (often a Rohrflute) so that LOW C of the pedals plays: CCC of the Bourdon, EE, BB-flat and D (natural) of the 8' Rohrflute and CCC of the 16' trumpet extention (So there are >5< pipes playing on eacn note of the bottom pedal =   octave of keys, the at c-13 of the pedals the wiring breaks back to play = only the CCCof the Trumpet extention. I service several 70's and 80's vintage organs from Moller and this is the same scheme used in all those = instances.   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Pedal Cornet/Resultant 32' Reed From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 09:50:04 -0700   Hmmm ... wonder why it omits the GG? Also, I'd think the harmonics from = the Swell flute would be from the 16' extension, and play an octave lower, so that = low C on the Pedal board would sound:   CC - Pedal 16' Bourdon CC - Pedal 16' Trumpet EE - Swell 16' Rohr Flute GG - Swell 16' Rohr Flute BB flat - Swell 16' Rohr Flute D - Swell 16' Rohr Flute   I've also seen Reed Cornets that did this:   CC - Pedal 16' Trumpet EE - Swell 16' Flute GG - Swell 16' Bassoon BB flat - Swell 16' Flute D - Swell 16' Flute   Which I'd think would be more desirable, since the quint would be louder = than the tierce, septieme and none.   Cheers, Bud   RMaryman@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 7/26/01 1:36:41 PM EST, randyterryus@yahoo.com = writes: > > > By the way, does anyone know the pitches that make up the first = octave of > > the Trumpet Cornet - Moller did this with some success in live rooms = where > > the first octave was a 32' harmonics, > The Moller harmonics was usually wired out of the Swell flute (often a > Rohrflute) so that LOW C of the pedals plays: CC of the Bourdon, EE, > BB-flat and D (natural) of the 8' Rohrflute and CC of the 16' trumpet > extention (So there are >5< pipes playing on eacn note of the bottom = pedal > octave of keys, the at c-13 of the pedals the wiring breaks back to play = only > the CC of the Trumpet extention. I service several 70's and 80's vintage > organs from Moller and this is the same scheme used in all those = instances. > > Rick in VA > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedal Cornet/Resultant 32' Reed From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 13:29:35 EDT   reviewing my earlier posting on the Moller Reed Cornet 32'   SHOULD READ:   LOW C on the pedalboard plays:   CCC (16' C) Trumpet CCC of the 16' Bourdon EE (which is the E above the 8' Rohrflute) BB-flat D (which is the D above tenor D)   Omitting the Reed can give a very convincing 32' resultant effect IF the balance of the Prime note (16' C of the bourdon) and the 'harmonics' rank = is right. the quint pitch of the 16' C can be added, but tends to 'stick out' = as you ascend the scale..   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Silent Movie drew an enthusiastic crowd (crossposted) From: "Jon C." <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 17:27:26 -0500   Last night at the former Gateway Theatre (now part of the Copernicus Center) in Chicago a near capacity crowd filled the Gateway for the = showing of the first movie of the Silent Film Society's Summer Silent Film Festival....the movie was Fritz Lang's classic "Metropolis". Normally part =   of the enjoyment of a silent film is spoiled by the poor quality of prints =   that are usually available. In this case a restored 35mm print was available and the projected film was sharp and clear. Also sharp was the theatre pipe organ accompaniment provided by the Gateway's house organist, =   Jay Warren. Mr. Warren's ability to bring a film to life with his photo-play accompaniment is a delight. The crowd was pleased as well evidenced by the loud applause and cheers at the end of the feature. =   Next week the film event continues with another fine film, "The Son of the =   Sheik" with Rudolph Valentino accompanied by Dennis James at the organ and =   the 30 piece Lincolnwood chamber orchestra in pit. Te Gateway Theatre is located at 5216 W. Lawrence Ave, Chicago, Il. (all shows on Fridays at 8PM) and you can park free in the theatre lot. The full schedule can be found on the VoxCatoe Calendar at: http://www.catoe.org/calendar.html   It is really a great experience to see a fine film and chance to see a theatre organ do the task it was originally intended to perform. The = organ, which is the second theatre pipe organ installed in this theatre, is a = 3/17 WurliTzer-Kimball organ.   jch